OMA & BIG among 6 Winners in Rebuild By Design Competition

The proposed Waterfront. Image Courtesy of OMA

Yesterday, US Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Shaun Donovan announced OMA, BIG and four other teams as the winner of “Rebuild by Design“, a competition aimed at rebuilding areas affected by Hurricane Sandy focusing on resilience, sustainability and and livability.

In total, HUD have allocated $920 million to the six projects in New York, New Jersey and Long Island to enable the completion of this vision.

Read more about the winning schemes after the break

Four Practices Re-Envision Parking in Long Island Downtowns

Parks and Rides. Image © Roger Sherman Architecture + Urban Design and the Index

Long Island’s downtowns have more than 4,000 acres of surface area dedicated to parking lots. That’s roughly 6.5 square miles of prime real estate, a phenomenon quite common in most American cities. When necessary, these lots are often exchanged for a standard “set of concrete shelves” that share little to no connection with their surroundings. This leads to the question, why must parking garages be so monofunctional and, well, ugly?

To help solve this nationwide issue, the Long Island Index challenged four leading architectural firms to envision a more innovative way to free up surface lot space in four Long Island communities.

See what they came up with, after the break…

3C Competition Winners Announced

First Place: Adaptive Urban Habitats / Mixed Paper

Operation Resilient (ORLI) has just announced the winners of its 3C: Comprehensive Coastal Communities ideas competition. Entrants were asked to design solutions that were not just resilient but also contextually sensitive and pragmatic to the devastating aftermath of Super-storm Sandy as well as all future natural disasters. Over 60 submissions were received from 20 different countries and 32 finalists were engaged in a public education strategy through a public voting campaign. A jury panel of eight leading professionals in the fields of architecture, urban planning and disaster mitigation met in mid-September to review the top finalists and selected 3 winners.

The 2013 winners of the 3C Competition are:

Parrish Art Museum / Herzog & de Meuron

Parrish Art Museum / Herzog & de Meuron; Photos © Matthu Placek

Architect: Herzog & de Meuron
Location: Water Mill, ,
Client: Parrish Art Museum
Photos: Matthu Placek

   

Video: Modern Tide: Midcentury Architecture on Long Island

After WWII, the East End of played host to a variety of architectural styles.  From modernism, through post-modernism, and deconstructionism,  architects experimented with social ideas and aesthetic expressions which culminated in “small” houses scattered about the Island’s natural backdrop.  Now, with the advent of the mega-mansion and the desire for “bigger”, it is becoming increasingly difficult to preserve such iconic and progressive architectural projects.

More about the film after the break. 

Louver House / LSS

© Paul Warchol

Architects: Leroy Street Studio
Location: , NY
Completion: 2007
Size: 7,400 sf House, 1,900 sf Wood Shop and Garage
Photographs: Paul Warchol

Sagaponack House / Selldorf Architects

© Nikolas Koenig

This 15,000 sqf house is a short walk from the Atlantic Ocean, in an open field typical of eastern . An oversized garden wall anchors the building to the landscape. The rooms are organized around a large square courtyard. Bordering the courtyard, a marble-lined breezeway separates the public and private spaces.

Architect: Selldorf Architects
Location: Long Island, New York, USA
Photographs: Nikolas Koenig

Richard Meier’s Model Museum in Long Island City Reopens

© Richard Meier & Partners

Richard Meier & Partners is pleased to announce the anticipated reopening of the Richard Meier Model Museum in City on Friday, May 13, 2011. Offering a rare glimpse into the process behind his distinguished 40-year career as an architect, Mr. Meier is once again unveiling his vast breadth of works to the public for its fifth consecutive season.

Further information after the break.

PARK + NetLab Named Winners in Competition to Re-Imagine Long Island’s Downtowns

Courtsy of +

“Build a Better Burb”, a design and planning competition sponsored by the Long Island Index with the Rauch Foundation, has named the team of PARK and NetLab as one of five winners. Will Prince of the architecture and planning studio PARK and Kazys Varnelis, the founder of NetLab, collaborated on the winning proposal “Long Division,” a regional strategy that promotes both responsible growth and planned contraction.

More images, a video on the project,  and complete press release after the break.

Long Island House / Thomas Phifer and Partners

© Thomas Phifer + Partners – rendering by Encore

For Thomas Phifer + Partners’ latest residence, the firm takes inspiration from the envisioned site’s proximity to the water. The seemingly repetitious simplistic form is actually one continuous surface that undulates to carve spaces underneath it.

More images and more about the residence after the break.

Huntington Urban Farm / Tim Stephens

©

New Zealand architect, Tim Stephens, shared his Huntington design with us. The farm responds to the lack of support for the sustainable practice of growing and cultivating one’s own food source, an important issue Stephens sees as becoming more prevalent as our population increases.  The farm provides convenient access to individualized plots of land where users can produce their own food right in the middle of the town.

More images and more about the project after the break.

Jewish Community Center / ODA, Office for Design and Architecture

1250703616-final-night-lighter-lres

The Office for Design and Architecture has designed a new Jewish Community Center for , .  Sharing the site with an existing land mark synagogue from 1930, a school center from 1948 and a new wing of social facilities from 1966, the JCC’s space was limited.  Yet, the firm aimed to create a center that would serve as “an iconic sculptural statement in a moderately conservative community” even in the tight space.

More about the JCC after the break.