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Edward Durell Stone

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The Architecture of Washington DC's Watergate Complex: Inside America’s Most Infamous Address

09:30 - 1 March, 2018
The Architecture of Washington DC's Watergate Complex: Inside America’s Most Infamous Address, Courtesy of Joe Rodota
Courtesy of Joe Rodota

Joseph Rodota's new book The Watergate: Inside America’s Most Infamous Address (William Morrow) presents the story of a building complex whose name is recognized around the world as the address at the center of the United States' greatest political scandal—but one that has so many more tales to tell. In this excerpt from the book, the author looks into the design and construction of a building The Washington Post once called a "glittering Potomac Titanic," a description granted because the Watergate was ahead of its time, filled with boldface names—and ultimately doomed. 

On the evening of October 25, 1965, the grand opening of the Watergate was held for fifteen-hundred guests. Luigi Moretti, the architect, flew in from Rome. Other executives came from Mexico, where the Watergate developer, the Italian real estate giant known as Societa Generale Immobiliare, was planning a community outside Mexico City, and from Montreal, where the company was erecting the tallest concrete-and-steel skyscraper in Canada, designed by Moretti and another Italian, Pier Luigi Nervi.

AD Classics: Museo de Arte de Ponce / Edward Durell Stone

04:00 - 28 September, 2016
AD Classics: Museo de Arte de Ponce / Edward Durell Stone, © Mary Ann Sullivan
© Mary Ann Sullivan

Among the dignitaries in attendance at the dedication ceremony of the Museo de Arte de Ponce (MAP) in Puerto Rico was Roberto Sánchez Vilella. In his capacity as Governor of the island, he gave a tongue-in-cheek speech[1] directed at his political opponent and founder of the museum, Luis A. Ferré:

I feel that I have contributed, in my small way, to the building of this museum. Had I not defeated Luis Ferré in the election, he would not have had sufficient leisure time to devote to this cultural project.

© Mary Ann Sullivan © Mary Ann Sullivan © Mary Ann Sullivan © Mary Ann Sullivan + 15

AD Classics: Radio City Music Hall / Edward Durell Stone & Donald Deskey

04:00 - 29 July, 2016
AD Classics: Radio City Music Hall / Edward Durell Stone & Donald Deskey, Courtesy of Flickr user Erik Drost
Courtesy of Flickr user Erik Drost

Upon opening its doors for the first time on a rainy winter’s night in 1932, the Radio City Music Hall in Manhattan was proclaimed so extraordinarily beautiful as to need no performers at all. The first built component of the massive Rockefeller Center, the Music Hall has been the world’s largest indoor theater for over eighty years. With its elegant Art Deco interiors and complex stage machinery, the theater defied tradition to set a new standard for modern entertainment venues that remains to this day.

Courtesy of Flickr user Ed Schipul Courtesy of Flickr user Roger Courtesy of Flickr user Steve Huang Courtesy of Flickr user Mattia Panciroli + 10

Vice President Joe Biden to Break Ground on Steven Holl's Kennedy Center Expansion Today

00:00 - 4 December, 2014
Vice President Joe Biden to Break Ground on Steven Holl's Kennedy Center Expansion Today, Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects
Courtesy of Steven Holl Architects

Almost 50 years to the day after President Lyndon B Johnson broke ground on Edward Durell Stone's design for the John F Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington DC, today Vice President Joe Biden will do the same for Steven Holl Architects' design of the Kennedy Center Expansion, a largely below-ground addition that will add an extra 60,000 square feet to the Center.

AD Classics: The Museum of Modern Art

01:00 - 24 September, 2013
AD Classics: The Museum of Modern Art, View of the gallery complex from the Sculpture Garden. Image © Timothy Hursley
View of the gallery complex from the Sculpture Garden. Image © Timothy Hursley

The entrance to the Museum of Modern Art is tucked beneath a demure facade of granite and glass in Midtown Manhattan. Its clean, regular planes mark Yoshio Taniguchi's 2004 addition to the MoMA's sequence of facades, which he preserved as a record of its form. Taniguchi's contribution sits beside the 1984 residential tower by Cesar Pelli and Associates, followed by Philip Goodwin and Edward Durell Stone’s original 1939 building, then Philip Johnson’s 1964 addition. Taniguchi was hired in 1997 to expand the Museum’s space and synthesize its disparate elements. His elegant, minimal solution presents a contemporary face for the MoMA while adhering to its Modernist roots.

53rd Street entrance. Image © Timothy Hursley The Atrium. Image © Timothy Hursley View of the gallery complex from 54th Street. Image © Timothy Hursley Sequence of facades on 53rd Street. Image © Timothy Hursley + 29