KPF Obtains Planning Permission for London’s “New Bondway”

© KPF

After months of planning and preliminary design, it is expected that architecture firm KPF will be given permission to proceed with their New Bondway project in Vauxhall, London. This complex is sited in the Vauxhall Nine Elms Battersea Opportunity Area, in close proximity to the new US embassy. The property was previously to be the site for the Octave Tower designed by Make architects, until the proposal was rejected by the Secretary of State.

North London Hospice / Allford Hall Monaghan Morris

© Timothy Soar

Architects: Allford Hall Monaghan Morris
Location: North London Hospice, 71 Chase Side, London N14 5BQ,
Area: 8000.0 ft2
Year: 2012
Photographs: Timothy Soar

The Workshop / Guy Hollaway Architects

© Charles Hosea

Architects: Guy Hollaway Architects
Location: ,
Year: 2013
Photographs: Charles Hosea

Will Alsop Designs Apartment Tower on Stilts for London’s South Bank

Courtesy of

Led by Will Alsop, aLL Design’s funky apartment tower will soon add a whole lot of interest to London’s south bank. The tubular building, which tapers at the bottom and top, will rise above an existing four-storey building on purple stilts and be adorned with corten steel cladding, brightly colored balconies, and irregular rounded windows. Each apartment will include two balconies overlooking the River Thames and the neighboring heliport – bringing about the name “Heliport Heights.” To learn more about the lively design, keep reading after the break.

Dalston Studio / Cassion Castle Architects

© Kilian O’Sullivan

Architects: Cassion Castle Architects
Location: Dalston, London E8,
Area: 60.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Kilian O’Sullivan

Performance Space: Marina Abramović at the Serpentine Gallery

© Marco Anelli

One of the latest installations at London’s Serpentine Gallery, where Smiljan Radic recently unveiled an ethereal pavilion, is Marina Abramović’s performance entitled 512 Hours. Creating what has been described as “the simplest of settings” in one of the gallery’s large spaces, the artwork employs Abramović’s most frequently used material: herself. Coupled with the audience and a selection of common objects, the constantly changing sequence of events on display is the very first live installation by the artist displayed in the . Upon arrival, visitors are asked leave their baggage (including mobile phones, cameras and any other electronic equipment) behind in order to enter the exhibition. Find out more about what you can expect from it here.

OPSO / K-Studio

© Tom Gildon

Architects: K-Studio
Location: 10 Paddington Street, Marylebone, W1U 5QL, UK
Photographs: Tom Gildon

From Derelict Structure to Urban Cinema

Courtesy of

The Cineroleum, a self-initiated project built in 2010 by London based practice Assemble Studio, transformed a derelict petrol station into a “hand-built” cinema on one of capital’s busiest roads. Aimed at raising awareness to the wider potential for reusing the 4,000 empty petrol stations across the for public use, the adapted structure on Clerkenwell Road was ”enclosed by an ornate curtain” strung from the “roof of the petrol station’s forecourt. Described as an “improvisation of the decadent interiors that greeted audiences during cinema’s golden age,” classic infusions of cinematic iconography were integrated into a space built from only cheap, reclaimed or donated materials.

The Yellow Building / Allford Hall Monaghan Morris

© Timothy Soar

Architects: Allford Hall Monaghan Morris
Location: West Cross Route, W11, UK
Area: 161500.0 ft2
Year: 2008
Photographs: Timothy Soar

Competition Results: “Faith! A Place of Worship in London”

You Are Here / Felicity Barbur and Edward Crooks. Image Courtesy of Combo

Faith!, the latest ideas-based challenge organised by Combo Competitions, asked participants to design a place of worship in London. In spite of the beguiling simplicity of the title, coupled with a typically open brief, the placed winners and three honourable mentions exhibit a diverse, exciting collection of conceptual drawings and visuals. With an interesting balance of playful interpretations and more grounded proposals, all start to address relevant socio-political issues – such as the mutual acceptance and peaceful co-existence of different religions – in some way. The competition asked participants first and foremost to seek to merge two concepts: religion and knowledge.

Barking Central / Allford Hall Monaghan Morris

© Timothy Soar

Architects: Allford Hall Monaghan Morris
Location: London,
Design Team: Redrow Regeneration Ltd, London Borough of Barking & Dagenham
Project Manager: Gill Associates
Area: 376.0 ft2
Year: 2010
Photographs: Timothy Soar

Concrete House / Studio Gil

© Simon Kennedy

Architects: Studio Gil
Location: London,
Year: 2014
Photographs: Simon Kennedy

Astudio Complete Youth Space in East London

© Morley von Sternberg. Image Courtesy of

British practice Astudio have recently completed a large youth space in Poplar, East London, featuring a gym, recording studios and performance hall alongside multiple social and learning spaces. Designed with the input from other 1600 young people and stakeholders, the four year project has been part of a wider initiative to address the inadequate provision of existing youth facilities in the London borough of Tower Hamlets. As the team’s second youth space completed in the last year, Spotlight has recently been shortlisted for a World Architecture Festival Award.

Temple of Agape / Morag Myerscough + Luke Morgan

© Gareth Gardner

Architects: Morag Myerscough ,
Location: London,
Artists: Morag Myerscough, Luke Morgan
Year: 2014
Photographs: Gareth Gardner, Supergrouplondon

Has The Surge Of Visitors to Museums & Galleries Reached A Tipping Point?

Crowds around Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa at the Louvre, Paris. Image © Guia Besana

In an article for the New York Times Rachel Donadio examines Masterworks vs. the Masses. From the Louvre in Paris to London’s British Museum, Florence’s  to the Vatican Museums, the increasing surge of visitors to these international cultural nodes “has turned many museums into crowded, sauna-like spaces.” Balancing everyone’s right to be “nourished” by cultural experiences with protecting and preserving the works of art in question is a very real problem. According to Donadio, ”even when the art is secure, the experience can become irksome.” With some museums seeing annual visitors of up to 6.7 million visitors (British Museum), addressing the issues faced by institutions that are a victim of their own success is becoming more and more pressing. Read the article in full here.

Stirling Prize Winning Architects Build LEGO Cities for the London Festival of Architecture

Organised as part of the London Festival of Architecture. Image © Agnese Sanvito

As part of the 2014 London Festival of Architecture, teams of architects from the four of the most recent Stirling Prize winning British practices were challenged with creating the most imaginative piece of a city – out of LEGO. Each team began with a carefully laid out square on the floor of the largest gallery of the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition, at which point they were given just one hour and 45 minutes to create an urban masterpiece out of blocks. Each group of architects worked alongside students from the Royal Academy’s attRAct programme, which offers A-level art students the chance to engage with art and architecture. An esteemed panel of judges ultimately selected the team from Zaha Hadid Architects as victorious, who “considered London on a huge scale and used curving buildings of different typologies which echoed the shape of the Thames.”

Read more about the brief and the other participating entries after the break.

Imperial War Museum / Foster + Partners

© Nigel Young –

Architects: Foster + Partners
Location: Lambeth Road, London,
Interiors: Casson Mann
Year: 2014
Photographs: Nigel Young – Foster + Partners

SURE Wins Competition with “Endless City” Skyscraper

© SURE

Recently winning first place in a Skyscapers and SuperSkyscapers Competition, SURE Architecture has put forth a daring new proposition for a London skyscraper design. Their proposal, titled “The Endless City in Height,” does away with the traditional notion of stacking floors on top of each other. Rather, this innovative design incorporates two street-sized ramps that wind their way up the exterior of the tower, creating extensions of the city streetscape that rise and coil vertically into the skyline.