VIDEO: Ruth and Richard Rogers’ London Home

 

In one of the latest short films from Nowness, director Matthew Donaldson explores the home of Ruth and Richard Rogers in ’s Chelsea. What appears to be a typical Georgian terrace from the outside, complete with “a resplendent facade in brick with uniform windows and smart stucco”, opens up into a bold, colourful and homely series of internal spaces that could only belong to Richard Rogers.

Hackney Marshes Centre / Stanton Williams

© Hufton & Crow

Architects: Stanton Williams
Location: London,
Project Manager: Arcadis AYH
Area: 3,060 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Hufton & Crow , David Grandorge, Andy Spain

Shortlist Unveiled for London’s new Scotland Yard

Allford Hall Monaghan Morris. Image Courtesy of Greater London Authority (GLA)

The RIBA and the Mayor of London’s Office has revealed the five shortlisted designs for the new Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) headquarters, set for completion in 2015. The proposed designs, attracting submissions from Foster + Partners, Allies & Morrison, Keith Williams Architects, Allford Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM), and Lifschutz Davidson Sandilands, will be located in the Whitehall Conservation Area and be renamed back to ‘Scotland Yard’.

Read more after the break…

Montpelier Community Nursery / AY Architects

© Daniel Stier

Architects: AY Architects
Location: Kentish Town, London Borough of Camden, London,
Area: 136 sqm
Photographs: Daniel Stier, Nick Kane

Review: ‘Richard Rogers: Inside Out’ at the Royal Academy

Zip-Up House Concept drawing (1968) – courtesy of . Image © Richard and Su Rogers

“Architecture is too complex to be solved by any one person.”

Richard Rogers is an architect who understands the significance of collaboration. As a man with an intense social mind and a thirst for fairness in architectural and urban design, Rogers’ substantial portfolio of completed and proposed buildings is driven by the Athenian citizen’s oath of “I shall leave this city not less but more beautiful than I found it.”

In honor of his success, London’s Royal Academy (RA) is currently playing host to a vast retrospective of Richard Rogers’ work, from his collaborations with Norman Foster and Renzo Piano, to the large-scale projects that define Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) today. The RA’s extensive exhibition has been condensed into a series of motifs that have defined his architectural work, punctuated by memorabilia which offer personal insights into how Rogers’ career has been shaped by the people he’s worked with and the projects that he has worked on.

Continue after the break for a selection of highlights from the exhibition. 

AD Classics: The Tate Modern / Herzog & de Meuron

Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

London’s Bankside Power Station stood disused from 1981 until 2000, when it opened to the public as The Tate Modern. Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron approached the conversion with a relatively light hand, creating a contemporary public space without diminishing the building’s historical presence. The impressive cultural icon has since become the most visited museum of modern art in the world, revitalizing its formerly sequestered, industrial neighborhood.

Central London Flat / VW+BS

© Michael Franke

Architects: VW+BS
Location: London, UK
Architect In Charge: Francisco Serradilla, Antonio Rentero
Year: 2013
Photographs: Michael Franke

Public Space Popping Up in London’s Suburbs

A Mobile town square designed for Cricklewood, by Studio Harto and Studio Kieren Jones. Image Courtesy of http://cricklewoodtownsquare.com/

Cricklewood, a North suburb devoid of public space, is finding a new lease of life through a series of pop-up interventions - including a mobile town square designed by Studio Hato and Studio Kieren Jones - put together by civic design agency Spacemakers. While the project might have a bit further to go before any benefits are truly felt by the local residents, the project is part of a wider scheme financed by the Mayor’s Outer London Fund which will hopefully lead to the rejuvenation of more of the capital’s suburbs. Read Liam O’Brien’s full article in The Independent here.

The Photon Project launches at the London Design Festival

Courtesy of The Building Centre

A large scale architectural installation, informative and free two day conference will take place at The Building Centre WC1 during the 2013 London Design Festival to launch a four year study into the effects of natural light.

A typical new home in the UK has an average of only 12% of the walls glazed. Natural light in the home and workplace can reduce energy costs and improve health and wellbeing, so why do we have so little natural light in our buildings?

The Photon Project is a major four-year scientific study to investigate the impact of natural light on biology and wellbeing. To launch the project a prototype fully-glazed ‘Photon Pod’ will be built in Central , complete with seating and landscaping. The installation and exhibition will be in place during the Design Festival (14 – 22 September). During this week the public are invited to experience ‘life under glass’ and take part in simple scientific tests, designed specifically for the event by Harvard University to test the effects of daylight on the human body.

Complete information after the break.

Southbank Centre Releases Proposals for Urban Skateboarding Space

Design option for new skateable space at Southbank Centre by 42 Architects. Image Courtesy of The Southbank Centre

Ever since London’s Southbank Centre and Feilden Clegg Bradley revealed plans for the new ‘Festival Wing‘ earlier this year, the plans have come under fire – and by no group more vociferous than London’s skateboarders.

The original plans proposed converting the space under Hungerford Bridge, used by skateboarders for years, into a new riverside area for urban arts. In response to skateboarders’ outcry, Southbank Centre has decided to alter the design of the space so that skateboarders’ needs will be taken into account. The Centre commissioned Iain Borden, skater and Professor of Architecture and Urban Culture at the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, and Rich Holland, skater and architectural designer at Floda31 to prepare a draft design brief earlier this summer; now, three architectural practices with skate-space experience have responded to the brief with three potential designs.·

An expert panel of skaters, including Borden, Holland, and film-maker Winstan Whitter, will then be responsible for “selecting the architect they’d most like to work with, finalising the design brief and developing the design.”

Check out the proposals from 42 Architects, SNE Architects and , after the break… 

London’s Largest “Living Wall” / Gary Grant

Courtesy of and Treebox

The Rubens at the Palace Hotel in Victoria, London, has unveiled the city’s largest “living wall” – a vertical landscape, composed of 16 tons of soil and 10,000 plants, designed to reduce urban flooding. Taking two months to construct and covering a 350 square foot area, the 21 meter high wall will beautify the cityscape year round with seasonal flowers such as strawberries, butter cups and winter geraniums.

Because of the lack of absorbent surfaces in the Victoria area of London, the Victoria Business Improvement District (BID) decided to step in with the design of this incredible wall that combats urban flooding with special water storage tanks. Designed by Gary Grant of Green Roof Consultancy, these tanks can store up to 10,000 liters of water that are then channeled back through the wall to nourish the plants. Not only will the wall do a great job of keeping the surrounding streets flood-free, it boosts the area’s green appeal and attracts wildlife into the dense urban environment.

The Oaks / SOUP Architects

© Richard Brine

Architects: SOUP Architects
Location: London, UK
Structural Engineer: Techniker
Services Engineer: Michael Popper Associates
Quantity Surveyor: Baillie Knowles Partnership
Main Contractor: Blake Builders
Photographs: Richard Brine

Reflection from the “Walkie Talkie” Making Cars Melt

, or the “,” by Rafael Viñoly Architects. Image © Flickr User pembridge2

The big story today is about a new development in London’s financial district dubbed The Walkie Talkie due to its unusual shape.

The combination of its shape (which is curved), its placement, and its height has apparently created a tremendously intense reflection and beam of light that creates extraordinary heat on a nearby block, and one Jaguar owner says his car literally suffered melting damage from having been parked in that spot.

Stephen Hodder Inaugurated as 75th President of the RIBA

Stephen Hodder, the newly inaugurated President of . Image © Ed Tyler, www.edtyler.com

Following Angela Brady’s two year tenure as head of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), Stephen Hodder MBE was officially inaugurated as the 75th President of the UK’s largest architectural body yesterday. Hodder, perhaps best known as the recipient of the first RIBA Stirling Prize in 1996 for the Centenary Building (University of Salford, UK), is chairman of the award-winning practice Hodder + Partners in Manchester (UK).

Kickstarter: London Skyline Reimagined as Chess Set

© Courtesy of Skyline Chess

Imagine your city skyline as a chessboard battleground; which landmark would declare itself as the almighty king and who serve as its faithful pawn? Well, according to British designers Ian Flood and Chris Prosser, London’s Canary Wharf, Renzo Piano’s Shard and Norman Foster’s Gherkin would all deserve high ranks while the ubiquitous London terraced house fulfilled the role of the pawn.

After replacing their own standard chess set with 3D-printed models of their city’s landmarks, Flood and Prosser have established the Kickstarter campaign “Skyline Chess” with the hopes of expanding their idea beyond London’s skyline. If the campaign is successful, architectural enthusiasts worldwide will have the opportunity to select any of the world’s most iconic cities (Shanghai vs. Paris?) for an ultimate duel of chess.

Learn more about the campaign here on the Kickstarter.

Elm Court / AR Design Studio

© Martin Gardner

Architects: AR Design Studio
Location: North, 1 Temple Gardens, London, UK
Architect In Charge: Mike Ford
Kitchen: Myers Touch, Winchester
Year: 2012
Photographs: Martin Gardner

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners’ Unveil Homeshell Prototype at London’s RA

© Ana Au, via

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) have unveiled a three story house in the courtyard of London’s Royal Academy of Arts (RA). Designed as an answer to the UK’s urgent need for cost-effective housing, the prototype demonstrates a method of building “high-quality, well-designed houses significantly cheaper than other traditional methods of construction.”

RSHP, known for their large-scale projects, envisage Homeshell as part of a wider platform which could encompass apartments, schools, factories and healthcare centers.

Agar Grove Estate Redevelopment Proposal / Hawkins\Brown

Courtesy of Forbes Massie

Hawkins\Brown, with Mae Architects and Grant Associates, have been appointed by Borough of Camden to develop proposals in collaboration with residents for the potential redevelopment of the Agar Grove Estate, a major housing regeneration project for London with an estimated construction value of £55 million. The current proposal being developed includes the demolition of 112 homes and the provision of around 360 new homes, bringing the total number of homes to around 500. A range of unit types has been introduced including family terrace housing and maisonettes with gardens, as well as lateral flats with balconies. More images and architects’ description after the break.