7N Architects Reveal Glasgow Masterplan

Courtesy of 7N Architects

Edinburgh-based 7N Architects has revealed their masterplan for Shawfield in Glasgow, a development containing 1.2 million square feet of “flexible business space” next to the River Clyde. Produced for the Clyde Gateway Urban Regeneration Company, the scheme aims to capitalize on the growth and investment that was brought to by this summer’s Commonwealth Games by providing “a nationally significant business district which will play a strong role in contributing to growth in Scotland‘s economy.”

Glasgow School of Art Begins Search for Restoration Architect

© Gordon Hawes Via The Mac Photographic Archive

To repair the damage caused by May’s devastating fire, the Glasgow School of Art is searching for a team to carry out the of Charles Rennie Mackintosh‘s celebrated building. Following the overwhelming public support for restoration instead of a contemporary reinterpretation, the selected team will be required to return the building to its original condition over a predicted construction period of five years. More on the restoration after the break.

Two Symposiums Will Help Determine Glasgow School of Art’s Restoration

School of Art ablaze (unknown source)

The Glasgow School of Art have announced that they will hold two symposiums in order to discuss the restoration of the school’s library which was devastated in a fire in May of this year. The first conference, to be held in Venice’s Querini Stampalia, will act as a precursor to a second conference to be held in Glasgow in 2015. According to Professor Christopher Platt, head of the Mackintosh School of Architecture, the meetings will help to answer the question: “What should the plans be for bringing the Mackintosh building into full use once more and how should we approach the particular issue of the Macintosh library?”

Review: MacMag39, Mackintosh School of Architecture

Courtesy of MagMag39

MagMag, a student-edited compendium of essays, projects and ideas from Glasgow’s Mackintosh School of Architecture, is now in its 39th edition. Following on from what has so far been a momentous year for the Mac, in which they’ve seen Steven Holl Architects’ new Seona Reid Building formally open and parts of Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s art school (along with a great deal of student work) devastated in a fire, MacMag39 is a celebration of the spirit of a school which is faced with a challenging question: how do they introduce and then reconcile the new alongside the existing against the backdrop of an academically rich, diverse and successful learning environment?

Video: Inside Steven Holl’s Reid Building at Glasgow School of Art

Steven Holl Architects, in collaboration with Spirit of Space, have created two short films of the recently completed Seona Reid Building at Glasgow School of Art. The series explores the complementary contrast of the new Reid Building and Charles Rennie Mackintosh’s 1909 building (which recently suffered a devastating fire), where “each work of architecture heightens the integral qualities of the other.”

The first film takes the viewers on a “poetic climb” up and through the building’s social circuit, which “purposefully encourages inter-disciplinary activity, with the hope to inspire positive energy for the future of art.” The second film unpacks the design of the Reid Building in a conversation with design architects Steven Holl and Chris McVoy.

Photographic Archive Crowdsources Your Memories of The Mac

The Library in 1976. Image © Gordon Hawes Via The Mac Photographic Archive

The interior of Charles Rennie Mackintosh‘s Glasgow School of Art is, thankfully, being restored after being tragically damaged by fire last month. However, despite Scottish Fire and Rescue managing to save around 70% of the building’s precious contents, many will likely struggle to get over the feeling that something is missing without the natural patina of 100 years of use.

In response to this feeling, GSA Alumnus Lizzie Malcolm and Daniel Powers have created The Mac Photographic Archive, a website that allows anyone to upload photographs of the building and tag them with the room they depict and the date they were taken – compiling the ultimate collection of memories of the building’s proud . Click here to look through the archive, and contribute your own images to the collection.

Steven Holl Reflects on the Majesty of the Mackintosh

Following the devastating news that the Mackintosh School of Art’s iconic library was recently destroyed, Steven Holl - designer of the adjacent Seona Reid Building that opened earlier this year – reflects on the “magic” of what has been lost in an article for the Architectural Record. The Charles Rennie Mackintosh building, for Holl, “embodies a refreshingly direct conviction”, the sudden loss of which brought on a “deep sadness.” Placing it within a canon of architectural masterpieces, Holl gives insight to his emotional connections with this Glaswegian masterpiece: “the School of Art has an inner worth and a dignity beyond all measurable value.” Read the article in full here.

10 Fires That Changed Architecture Forever

After being destroyed by fire and laying in ruins for 60 years, the Reichstag became a symbol of the new democracy in the 1990s with Norman Foster’s renovation. Image © Flickr CC User Werner Kunz

With no casualties, last week’s fire at the Glasgow School of Art, which caused significant damage to parts of the building and gutted Charles Rennie Mackintosh‘s canonical library room, will be remembered as a tragic event that robbed us of one of the best examples of Art Nouveau of its time. The intention of the is to restore the building in the hope that in generations to come, the fire will be all but forgotten, a strategy which has been largely well received by the profession.

However, in the case of other fires things have not gone so smoothly: for millennia, fire has played a big role in determining the course of architectural history - by destroying precious artifacts, but often also by allowing something new to rise from the ashes. Read on after the break as we count down the top 10 fires that changed the course of architectural .

Glasgow School of Art Begins to Pick Up the Pieces

The wreckage of the Glasgow School of Art Library. Image © Scottish and Rescue via BBC

After the tragic fire that tore through Charles Rennie Mackintosh‘s Glasgow School of Art last week, thoughts have now turned to the future of the building and the process of . It seems that many people in the profession are in favour of a faithful : John McAslan, who has previously worked on restoring one of Mackintosh’s buildings in Northampton, saying that “it is not the time and place to interpret Mackintosh”, and former GSA student and ex-director of FAT Sam Jacob commenting that the building “hadn’t been turned into a museum piece” and therefore “a faithful restoration is exactly the right thing to do.”

Though there has been one dissenting voice from George Cairns, a professor at Melbourne‘s RMIT who completed his PhD thesis on the building in 1992 and believes that a faithful restoration is impossible. In any case, this is what the Glasgow School of Art has resolved to do, and they have received a number of offers of help. Read on after the break to find out what’s being done, and what you can do to help, after the break.

Fire Breaks Out at Glasgow School of Art

UPDATE: The School of Art Media Centre reports ”With the incident under control indications are the firefighters’ efforts have ensured more than 90 per cent of the structure is viable and protected up to 70 per cent of the contents – including many students’ work.”

A serious fire has broken out at the Glasgow School of Art, ’s 1909 masterpiece. The extent of the damage is unclear at the moment, but BBC News is reporting that the fire is believed to have started in the basement, and has spread to the upper floors, where it is breaking windows and smoke is billowing from the building. Images, reactions and updates from twitter after the break.

Foster + Partners’ SSE Hydro Arena Features Translucent Skin, Innovative Seating System

Courtesy of Figueras

Glasgow has just unveiled its new multipurpose structure which will end up revitalizing the Clyde Waterfront, which went into decline and neglect for many years following the closure of the town’s major shipyards. After 8 years of construction, Foster + Partners’ SSE Hydro now reveals its ETFE facade which is lit up every evening. During the day it manages to blend in with the usual changing Glasgow skyline.

The structure of the SSE Hydro Arena is covered by a 1.400 ton steel housing – one of the largest domes in Europe – and the ETFE translucent building enclosure allows one to discern what is happening inside from the outside. A 260 ton ring which supports the is suspended from the dome, which will allow spectacular and customized for each show.

The modern technology applied to this project contrasts with its interior structure that has been based on the Roman amphitheater, allowing each and every spectator at an event — which can be up to 13.000 — to have an optimal view of the stage. The viewing angle and comfort of the user is furthermore guaranteed by the special system designed by Foster + Partners along with Figueras International Seating.

Glasgow Scraps Plan for Europe’s Largest Demolition

© Amanda Vincent-Rous

UPDATE: The Guardian reports that the plans to demolish the Red Road Flats during the Commonwealth Games have been scrapped due to concerns over public safety. The following news was originally published as “Glasgow to Demolish Iconic Modern Towers in Europe’s Largest Demolition” on April 10th, 2014.

To mark the arrival of the Commonwealth Games in July, Glasgow is planning a twist on the usual opening ceremony: the customary fireworks are going to be replaced with explosives of an altogether different kind, as the demolition of all but one of the remaining Red Road Flats buildings will be broadcast live into the stadium.

The demolition of the five 30-story buildings will take 15 seconds and will be the largest ever attempted in Europe, according to the organizers. According to Games Organizer Eileen Gallagher, including the demolition as part of the opening ceremony shows that Glasgow is “a city that is proud of its history but doesn’t stand still, a city that is constantly regenerating, renewing and re-inventing itself.”

International Symposium for Social and Humanitarian Architecture

Next Month, the Mackintosh School of Architecture (The Glasgow School of Art) will host its first International Symposium for Social and Humanitarian Architecture, ‘Clean Conscience Dirty Hands’, in the new Reid Building by Steven Holl Architects. The symposium focuses on the limited resources intrinsic to the provision of social and humanitarian architecture and the impact of such scarcity on the ability of organisations to ‘harness’ the learning from each built project through documentation, discussion and dissemination. As such, it seeks to provide both a locus and a forum for like-minded organisations engaged in social and humanitarian building projects, in order to capture and disseminate good practice in both a UK-based and overseas context.

International and award-winning speakers representing a multitude of organisations, including MASS Design Group, TYIN Tegnestue, Architecture for Humanity, London Metropolitan University, Peter Rich Architects and Orkidstudio will gather to discuss a range of ideas relating to one of the three topics broadly covered by the symposium:

Seona Reid Building / Steven Holl Architects

© Iwan Baan

Architects: Steven Holl Architects
Location: The School of Art, 167 Renfrew Street, , City G3 6RQ
Partners In Charge: Chris McVoy, Noah Yaffe
Project Architect: Dominik Sigg
Area: 11250.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Iwan Baan, Chris McVoy

Laboratorio Espresso / DO-Architecture

© John Wood Photowork

Architects: DO-Architecture
Location: 93 West Nile Street, Glasgow,
Area: 30 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: John Wood Photowork

Dalmarnock Station / ATKINS

© Andrew Lee

Architects: ATKINS
Location: Dalmarnock, , UK
Area: 600 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Andrew Lee

Zaha Hadid Wins European Museum of the Year Award for Riverside

Riverside Museum / ZHA © McAteer Photograph/Alan McAteer

Riverside Museum in Glasgow, Scotland, has won the prestigious (EMYA) for it’s ability to “demonstrate brilliantly how a specialist transport collection can renew its relevance through active engagement with the wider social and universal issues.”

Out of 40 museums from across 21 European countries, the jury agreed unanimously that ZHA’s Riverside Museum fulfilled the EMYA criteria of ‘public quality’ at the highest level. 

Speirs Locks Student Campus Proposal / Stallan-Brand

Courtesy of

The proposal for the Speirs Locks Student Campus by Stallan-Brand seeks to integrate existing structures of merit and to introduce new public spaces around them. The retention of an old glue factory as a gallery and historic walls capture the site’s industrial past. The retention of an existing ornate brick wall, once the ground floor of the City Council Cleansing Department, is used to define a new public space, creating a unique arrival and provide the adjacent studio spaces with an appropriate external display space. More images and architects’ description after the break.