New Images Unveiled of Cornell Tech’s Roosevelt Island Campus

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New information has been released — along with a series of renders — seven months after the New York City Council approved Cornell University’s two million square foot technology campus in Roosevelt Island. Envisioned as “a campus built for the next century,” Cornell Tech’s first set of buildings has tapped into the talent of some of the most respected architecture firms in the city: Morphosis‘ Pritzker Prize-winning Thom Mayne, Weiss/Manfredi Architecture, Handel Architects, and Skidmore Owings & Merrill.

New images of the buildings, after the break…

‘Vers un climat: Building (with) the Unstable’ Exhibition

© AWP , Bosheng Gan, Marchand & Meffre, Anna Positano

Taking place at the Hartell Galley at Cornell University, ‘Vers un climat: Building (with) the Unstable‘ is an exhibition by AWP Architects focusing on the nocturnal face of architecture – how buildings contribute to the urban nightscape. From August 26 – September 16, the exhibit features both realized and proposed projects by AWP while revealing the practice’s in depth research on the many ways in which the intangible dimensions of architecture – such as atmosphere, climate, and light – materialize in buildings. Part of AWP ’s ongoing challengeis to translate recurrent themes of impermanence, evolution, and the uncontrollable into design. More architects’ description after the break.

Council Approves Cornell’s Net-Zero Tech Campus on Roosevelt Island

© Kilograph

City Council has approved Cornell’s two-million-square-foot tech campus planned to break ground in 2014 on ’s Roosevelt Island. Masterplanned by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (), the ambitious carbon positive campus will offer housing for 2,000 full-time graduate students, world-class education facilities, a hotel, a corporate co-location building, and more than an acre of public open space. Construction will commence with the first, state-of-the-art academic building that will be designed by Thom Mayne, founder of Morphosis, who will incorporate the latest environmental advances, such as geothermal and solar power, to achieve net-zero energy for the landmark structure.

CornellNYC selects Architect for Net-Zero Tech Campus

Master Plan Schematic Design ©

Today, Cornell University has announced their selection of Thom Mayne and Morphosis to design the first academic building for the CornellNYC Tech campus on Roosevelt Island. Mayor Michael Bloomberg awarded the Roosevelt Island campus project to Cornell mid-December of last year. With plans to achieve net-zero, the campus is striving to become the new modern prototype for learning spaces worldwide.

“This project represents an extraordinary opportunity to explore the intersection of three territories: environmental performance, rethinking the academic workspace and the unique urban condition of Roosevelt Island,” Mayne said, as reported by Cornell University. “This nexus offers tremendous opportunities not only for CornellNYC Tech, but also for New York City.”

Continue reading for more.

Cornell Reveals the Architects Competing to Design the First NYC Tech Campus Building

© Cornell University

After Mayor Bloomberg, Cornell President Skorton and Technion President Lavie announced Cornell’s victory over Stanford to build an eleven acre state-of-the-art tech campus on Roosevelt Island in City, the team has now tackled their next step in choosing six high-profile architecture firms competing to design the schools first academic facility.

Selected from over more than 40 firms from the U.S. and abroad, the finalists include Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, the Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA), Morphosis Architects, Steven Holl Architects and Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. Continue reading for more information.

Design Tactics and the Informalized City Symposium

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Informality, which was first categorized and described in the 1970s, is now pervasive — across cities, in the places we live, work, and move through the everyday. For many, the informal is no longer a discrete sector appended to the workings of the “formal” city, but an integral effect of the structuring of cities and landscapes by contemporary economic, political, and technological change. Self-built architectures and urban agglomerations, ambivalent landscapes, nomadic and temporal spatial manifestations of informalized are situationally specific, but globally ubiquitous. Design Tactics and the Informalized City symposium, being put on by Cornell University on April 13-14, brings a discussion of this reality to disciplines that work on the city in material and spatial terms: architecture, urban design, landscape architecture, engineering, media and product design. More information on the event after the break.

Cornell’s NYC Tech Campus Wins Competition

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Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg is set to announce Cornell University and its partner, the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, winner of the intense, yearlong competition to build a New York City Tech Campus on Roosevelt Island. The announcement follows Stanford University’s unexpected withdraw from the competition after tense negotiations with the Bloomberg administration. Meanwhile, last Friday Cornell received a $350 million donation in support of their proposal, being the largest gift the University has ever received.

Video: Rem Koolhaas Lecture, Opening Milstein Hall

Just recently, the author of architectural videos blog shared with us a video on OMA’s founding partner Rem Koolhaas‘ lecture which he gave at on October 20th. His lecture was given on the occasion of opening Milstein Hall, the new extension to the faculty of Architecture, Art and Planning designed by OMA.

Milstein Hall at Cornell University / OMA

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Milstein Hall, the new 25,000 sqf flexible studio space at Cornell’s College of Architecture, Art and Planning (AAP) in upstate New York, was opened last month for students.  The first new building in over 100 years for the AAP, the design by OMA was led by partners Shohei Shigematsu and Rem Koolhaas in collaboration with associate Ziad Shehab.

“Not only is this going to be our new home, but everyone has a new attitude,” AAP student Ben Waters told the Cornell Sun. “Everyone has this new-found sense of pride for the program.”  The excitement from students and the AAP surrounding the new hall comes with no surprise considering the danger that the program faced in early 2009 – threatening both their accreditation and the hopes of a new OMA designed building eliminated from the campus.

© Matthew Carbone

Featuring a unique hybrid truss system of 1,200 tons of steel to support two dramatic cantilevers Milstein Hall provides a must needed connection between the existing Sibley and Rand Hall.  Professor Mark Cruvellier shared, “We have a couple of buildings here on campus that were always divided, and we’d always have to run back and forth in the middle of winter.  Here, we have a building that not only connects Rand Hall and Sibley Hall together, but one that also embodies architecture and design ideas.”

Enclosed by floor-to-ceiling glass and a green roof with 41 skylights, this “upper plate” cantilevers almost 50 feet over University Avenue to establish a relationship with the Foundry, a third existing AAP facility.  The truss system allows for a wide-open upper plate that will house sixteen design studios.

“The upper plate of the box was a direct response to the need for interaction that the art field entails, though we realize this cannot be perfectly achieved or designed by architecture,” Shigematsu commented. “Our ambition for the upper plate was for it to serve as a pedagogical platform for the architecture, art and planning departments – an open condition that could trigger interaction and discussion. I am sure the students and faculty will generate unexpected uses and conditions that go beyond what we have planned for it.”

Thanks to architectural photographer Matthew Carbone for the amazing photos of this project!

Architects: OMA
Location: Ithaca, New York, USA
Client: , College of Architecture, Art and Planning (AAP)
Project Area: 47,000 sqf addition to the College of Architecture, Art and Planning – Studios, Crit spaces, Auditorium, Exhibition, Exterior Workspace and Plaza.
Project Year: 2009-2011
Photographs: Matthew Carbone

Competition for Roosevelt Island Coming to a Close – Stanford and Cornell among the Top Contenders

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Cornell University and Stanford University are competing for the environmental affections of City’s public officials as part of a contest for the design of a school of applied sciences. The Bloomberg-supported competition will end on October 28th and it promises to dole out $400 million in land and infrastructure improvements to the winning school. Each school is running an impressive campaign with a well developed infrastructure of “green technology”.   Read on for more about the proposals.

Cornell’s NYC Tech Campus drives towards “Net-Zero Energy” / SOM

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Cornell University’s proposed New York City Tech Campus on Roosevelt Island plans to become a sustainable landmark. Oriented by the sun, the 10-acre campus encompasses the largest solar array in New York City, four acres of geothermal wells, and 500,000 square-feet of open green space dedicated to the public. If built today, the campus’s 150,000 square-foot main academic building would be the largest net-zero energy building in the eastern United States.

The proposed campus is designed by Skidmore, Owings, & Merrill (). Landscape will be designed by James Corner Field Operations. Cornell teamed up with alumnus and managing director of Distributed Sun, Jeff Weiss, to help build a comprehensive energy solution. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the NYS Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) also participated in the conceptualization of the proposed renewable energy and energy efficient aspects.

Continue reading for more images and detailed information.

   

Milstein Hall at Cornell University / OMA

Copyright Cornell University

The highly anticipated Milstein Hall at Cornell University has officially opened its studios to students. It is the first new building in over 100 years for the renowned College of Architecture, Art and Planning (AAP). Designed by OMA, led by partner Shohei Shigematsu who directs the NY office, and and Pritzker Prize-winner , the design for the 47,000-square-foot building physically unites the AAP’s long-separated facilities to form a platform for interdisciplinary collaboration.

“Milstein Hall operates on many levels,” says AAP dean Kent Kleinman. “It redefines the entry for the northern edge of the campus; it provides a permeable boundary between academic space and the public; it offers extraordinary spatial relationships between internal programmatic elements; and it offers a landscape of studios that fosters a level of interaction between our undergraduate and graduate architecture students that we have never enjoyed before.”

Cornell overcame the danger of having both their accreditation and new architecture school eradicated from the campus, but as we reported in May of last year there has been smooth sailing in terms of the physical construction of ’S Milstein Hall ever since.

More about Milstein Hall following the break.

10 College Campuses with the Best Architecture

Photo by Rex Hammock - http://www.flickr.com/photos/rexblog/

Architectural Digest has compiled a list of college campuses throughout the which have the most remarkable architectural traditions, which broadcast their innovative philosophy through design. A number of colleges have fully incorporated modern architecture into their campus schemes, for example MIT; while others have preserved their historical edifices through the course of the years, like the University of Virginia. The list involves some prestigious institutions, in addition to some surprises, all possessing their individual architectural languages.

See the 10 College Campuses with the Best Architecture after the break.

AD Classics: Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University / I.M. Pei

© Cornell University

With a desire to make a dramatic statement while maintaining an optimal amount of scenic views, transparent open spaces and windows beautifully contrast the heaviness and boldness of the rectangular forms of concrete.

More on the at Cornell University by after the break.

The Cornell Journal of Architecture 8: RE

After a reflective sabbatical following the 7th issue, has recently launched itself back on the scene of primer architectural journals. The long awaited 8th issue strives to be “about the now, the new, and the next in architecture, while simultaneously acknowledging that every possible future is intrinsically linked to the existent, to the present and its attendant past. At the heart of issue 8: RE is the understanding that the creative act itself is reiterative; that in rethinking, recombining, reshuffling, recycling, and reimagining aspects of the world around us, we produce work that both belongs to the current moment and establishes new future trajectories.”

Table of Contents following the break.

Cornell Journal of Architecture Issue 8: RE


The Cornell Journal of Architecture recently released 8: RE, addressing the now, the new and the next in architecture – the understanding of the creative act itself being reiterative.   Marking the first publication of the Journal in eight years, 8: RE features some big name contributors, Philip Johnson, Peter Eisenman, and Rem Koolhaas, just to name a few. The Journal was released at a special exhibition in , College of Architecture, Art, and Planning at Cornell University, which also included a re-release of the Journal’s official website now featuring archives of the previous seven volumes, along with 8: RE.

A special launch event for the Cornell Journal of Architecture Issue 8: RE will be held tonight in New York City at the Storefront for Art and Architecture at 7pm.  Many of the Journal’s contributing authors  will be attending and be on hand to discuss their articles.

House-in-a-Can / Austin + Mergold

Courtesy of Austin + Mergold

Reexamining an ‘icon of the American landscape’ architects Austin + Mergold have created an innovate solution to pre-fabricated housing.   A typical metal grain dryer offers an interior footprint of roughly one thousand square feet, thirty-six feet in diameter.  The Philadelphia based, graduates, have developed a design that instantly assembles off-the-shelf. The soup can-shaped 2,000 square foot single family starter homes are constructed from 14 gauge galvanized corrugated steel exterior, have 2 or 3 bedrooms, an optional green house, and can have one or two levels accordingly.  Austin + Mergold recently partnered with Hometta where plans for House-in-a-Can will soon be available.  Follow the break for more drawings and sketches.

Architects: Austin + Mergold
Project Area: 36-foot diameter American grain dryer, 2,000 sqf

Preston Thomas Memorial Symposium 2010

This year’s Preston Thomas Memorial Symposium (August 27-28) will re-examine concepts central to the teaching of architectural design. The symposium draws on the experiences and insights of a core group of challenging educators and will address a matrix of critical issues: teaching arrangements and ideologies of foundational programs in architecture, techniques and theory as determining factors in the design processes, and the effect of architectural discourses on larger social constructs.

A significant part of the conference will be dedicated to discussions among speakers, faculty, and students, and is intended to amplify and interrogate the presentations. The conference is coordinated and led by Dagmar Richer, Chair of the Department of Architecture and Christian Otto, Professor of Architectural History. For details and participant abstracts, click here.