We’ve built you a better ArchDaily. Learn more and let us know what you think. Send us your feedback »

Lecture: Designing an Institute for Performance Art / Marina Abramović and Shohei Shigematsu

Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) recently held a lecture featuring performance artist Marina Abromović alongside OMA principle Shohei Shigematsu in the anticipation of the Marina Abromović Institute for the Preservation of Performing Art (MAI) 2014 opening. In the lecture, Shigematsu speaks about the process in which they transformed a former theater in Hudson, New York, into a structure that's capable of assisting the institute's mission to develop new kinds of performance, while functioning as a space for preserving and hosting historic performance pieces. Shigematsu references OMA’s history of designing spaces that combine architecture and art, such as the Quebec National Museum and a recent collaboration with Kanye West.

More on this discussion after the break...

House in Opatova / P-U-R-A

  • Architects: P-U-R-A
  • Location: Opatova, Slovakia
  • Design Team: René Dlesk, Roy Nash
  • Cooperation: Michael Franke, Branislav Repka
  • Site Area: 960 sqm
  • Area: 152.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2007
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Aparat

Courtesy of Aparat Courtesy of Aparat Courtesy of Aparat Courtesy of Aparat

Mosquito Coast Factory / Tolila+Gilliland

  • Architects: Tolila+Gilliland
  • Location: Zac Porte Estuaire, 44750 Campbon, France
  • Client: Mosquito Coast Factory
  • Area: 517.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Philippe Ruault

© Philippe Ruault © Philippe Ruault © Philippe Ruault © Philippe Ruault

Nova Lima House / Denise Macedo Arquitetos Associados

  • Project Architects: Denise Macedo, in partnership with Jr Piacesi
  • Arquitetura: Denise Macedo Arquitetos Associados
  • Collaborators: Patrícia Takamatsu, Ana Beatriz Cançado, Renato de Pieri, Bárbara Impelizieri, Alexandre Vasconcelos
  • Area: 1100 sqm
  • Ano Do Projeto: 2010
  • Fotografias: Gustavo Xavier

© Gustavo Xavier © Gustavo Xavier © Gustavo Xavier © Gustavo Xavier

On Zombies and The Immortality of the Shopping Mall

Image via Flickr User CC Gilderic Photography
Image via Flickr User CC Gilderic Photography

This article, which originally appeared on Bullett Media, is by writer Matthew Newton. Newton has written for The Atlantic, Esquire, Forbes, and Guernica, and is currently at work on No Place for Disgrace, a collection of nonfiction stories based on the faded promise of the American suburbs. You can follow him on Twitter @newtonmatthew.

In November of 1977, filmmaker George A. Romero arrived with cast and crew at Monroeville Mall, a sprawling indoor shopping center located in the suburbs east of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The young director, who by that time had established himself as a pioneer in the horror genre, was set to start production on his latest film, Dawn of the Dead, a sequel to his 1968 cult classic Night of the Living Dead. Once again Romero’s slow-shuffling ghouls — starved as always for brains and entrails, meaty thigh bones and plump jugulars — would be unleashed on bumbling humans ill-prepared for a world gone rotten.

This time around, however, Romero, who in Night of the Living Dead touched on issues of race in the civil-rights era, had plans to skewer a new social dilemma: the rise of the American consumer. And to properly lampoon the nation’s burgeoning shop-till-you-drop culture, Romero needed the ideal backdrop.

Read more of Matthew Newton's take on the immortality of the shopping mall, after the break...

Call for Submissions: In Pursuit of Architecture 2003–2013

Since its inception in September 2003, the journal Log has sought to present through writing the kinds of thinking and concepts that drive the making of architecture today. In Pursuit of Architecture, a special tenth anniversary issue of the magazine, will feature ten buildings that have contributed to architectural discourse between 2003 and 2013.  They are inviting all architects age 59 and younger to submit one building project completed or started between 2003 and 2013 for publication in this celebratory issue. Temporary pavilions, installations, or competition entries are not included. The deadline for submissions is April 15. For more information, please visit here.

Providence Wins Bloomberg’s Mayors Challenge

Bloomberg Philanthropies has announced the winners of the Mayors Challenge, a competition to inspire American cities to generate innovative ideas that solve major challenges and improve city life – and that ultimately can be shared with other cities to improve the well-being of the nation. Out of the 305 cities that competed in this inaugural competition, Providence, Rhode Island, was presented the Mayors Challenge Grand Prize for Innovation and a $5 million implementation award for its “cutting-edge early education initiative”. Mayors Challenge innovation prizes also were awarded to Chicago, Houston, Philadelphia, and Santa Monica, all of which will receive $1 million to support implementation. 

Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science / Grimshaw Architects

Courtesy of Grimshaw Architects
Courtesy of Grimshaw Architects

Slated to open in 2015, the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science is on its way to become the world's most innovative and sustainable science museum with the structural foundation now complete and the vertical construction currently in progress. Designed by Grimshaw Architects, the 250,000 square-foot complex will harness energy from water, sun, wind and even museum visitors to power exhibits and conserve resources. More images and architects' description after the break.

New Istanbul International Financial Center Master Plan / HOK

Courtesy of HOK
Courtesy of HOK

Integral to Turkey's plan to make its economy one of the world's 10 largest by 2023, the HOK-designed master plan for the Istanbul International Financial Center (IIFC) is now in construction. Built on a 170-acre site on the city's Asian side, the Turkish government's goal for the landmark IIFC project is to establish Istanbul as a global center for finance. The IIFC will house the head offices of the country’s financial market governing bodies, state-owned and private banks, and related businesses. It will include approximately 45 million square feet of office, residential, retail, conference, hotel and park space. More images and architects' description after the break.

Terraços de Cascais / Humberto Conde

  • Architects: Humberto Conde
  • Location: Cascaes, Portugal
  • Collaborators: Paulo Figueiredo , Helena Ramos , Leopoldo Calhau , Filipe Ramalho, Joana Catarré
  • Area: 3055.89 sqm
  • Project Year: 2005
  • Photographs: Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

AD Classics: Marin Civic Center / Frank Lloyd Wright

The Marin County Civic Center was Frank Lloyd Wright's last commission and largest public project, including several civic functions that would serve Marin County and San Francisco, which after the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge became closer than ever. Wright was selected for the project in 1957, winning a vote out of hope he would be able to best represent a democratic government open to the people through the Civic Center.

© Flickr User C.M. Keiner © Flickr User C.M. Keiner © Flickr User DB's travels © Flickr User DB's travels

Makoko Floating School / NLE Architects

A. H. McCoy Federal Office / Schwartz-Silver Architects

  • Architects: Schwartz-Silver Architects
  • Location: 100 West Capitol Street, Jackson, MS 39269, USA
  • Area: 428000.0 ft2
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Alan Karchmer

© Alan Karchmer © Alan Karchmer © Alan Karchmer © Alan Karchmer

NN House / PANDA

© Hiroyuki Hirai
© Hiroyuki Hirai
  • Architects: PANDA
  • Location: Tokyo, Japan
  • Architect In Charge: Kozo Yamamoto
  • Area: 62.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Hiroyuki Hirai

© Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai

Nikau House / Strachan Group Architects

  • Architects: Strachan Group Architects
  • Location: Parnell, Auckland
  • Architect In Charge: Strachan Group Architects
  • Design Team: Dave Strachan, Pat de Pont, Jessica Knight
  • Engineer: Thorne Dwyer Structures
  • Builder: Dave McGillivray
  • Area: 230.0 sqm
  • Photographs: Jackie Meiring

© Jackie Meiring © Jackie Meiring © Jackie Meiring © Jackie Meiring

Hunter Medical Research Institute / Denton Corker Marshall + SKM-S2F Architects

Courtesy of Denton Corker Marshall and SKM-S2F Architects in Association
Courtesy of Denton Corker Marshall and SKM-S2F Architects in Association
  • Architects: Denton Corker Marshall, SKM-S2F Architects
  • Location: Newcastle, NSW, Australia
  • Area: 15900.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2012
  • Photographs: Courtesy of Denton Corker Marshall and SKM-S2F Architects in Association

Courtesy of Denton Corker Marshall and SKM-S2F Architects in Association Courtesy of Denton Corker Marshall and SKM-S2F Architects in Association Courtesy of Denton Corker Marshall and SKM-S2F Architects in Association Courtesy of Denton Corker Marshall and SKM-S2F Architects in Association

UK Government Grants Approval to Liverpool Waters Scheme

controversial plan to redevelop a large area of Liverpool's waterfront has received an effective green light after the Communities Secretary of State, Eric Pickles, chose not to call in the scheme for a public inquiry. The £5.5 billion scheme is designed by Chapman Taylor and provides 9,000 homes, 300,000 square meters of office space and 50,000 square meters of hotel and other facilities. The scheme also includes the 55-story 'Shanghai Tower' and a cruise ferry terminal.

The plan has attracted criticism, in particular from English Heritage and UNESCO who worry that the size of the developments will negatively affect the Liverpool skyline, dominated for almost a century by the 'Three Graces' a trio of listed buildings that have come to define the view from the Mersey River. UNESCO has strongly opposed the development, placing Liverpool's world heritage site on it's 'endangered' list and threatening that if the scheme goes ahead, the area could lose its world heritage status.

Read more about the reaction to the scheme after the break...