Tunquén House / Nicolas Loi

01:00 - 12 June, 2014
Tunquén House / Nicolas Loi, © Marcos Mendizabal
© Marcos Mendizabal
  • Architects

  • Location

    Tunquen, Algarrobo, Valparaíso Region, Chile
  • Area

    250.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

© Marcos Mendizabal © Marcos Mendizabal © Marcos Mendizabal © Marcos Mendizabal +33

House K / Yuji Kimura Design

01:00 - 12 June, 2014
House K / Yuji Kimura Design, © Takumi Ota
© Takumi Ota

© Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota +25

Video: 14th Venice Architecture Biennale

00:00 - 12 June, 2014

Publication: "The Urburb - Patterns of Contemporary Living"

00:00 - 12 June, 2014
Publication: "The Urburb - Patterns of Contemporary Living", © Sternthal Books
© Sternthal Books

Written to accompany the minimal exhibition of the Israeli Pavilion at the Venice Biennale, “The Urburb - Patterns of Contemporary Living” tells the story of the Urburb, a built condition which is neither urban nor suburban, that dominates the contemporary Israeli landscape. Edited by Architect Ori Scialom and Dr. Roy Brand, the book brings together architectural photography and photographs of the installation interspersed amongst theoretical texts and short stories which address the cultural, political, and social aspects of the “Urburban” way of life. Learn more about the book, published by Sternthal Books, here.

Maracanã Stadium Roof Structure / schlaich bergermann und partner

01:00 - 12 June, 2014
Maracanã Stadium Roof Structure / schlaich bergermann und partner, © schlaich bergermann und partner, Marcus Bredt
© schlaich bergermann und partner, Marcus Bredt

© schlaich bergermann und partner, Marcus Bredt Roof Plan Structure Diagram Structure Diagram +14

Architectural Photographers: Timothy Soar

01:00 - 12 June, 2014
Architectural Photographers: Timothy Soar, Foggo Architects. Image © Timothy Soar
Foggo Architects. Image © Timothy Soar

It's clear that architecture inspires and impassions Timothy Soar - not only has the UK photographer spent most of his life visiting and capturing great architectural works, but - unlike most photographers, or architects for that matter - he also speaks eloquently about the architecture that inspires him. Describing his favorite building, AHMM's Yellow Building, he tells us it "delivers exquisite simplicity out of a complex lattice. The building has a lyrical poetry in the way it wraps and folds itself around the occupants – deft, confident and generous. It is one of London’s great spaces." 

Moreover, Soar believes deeply that his architectural photography does more than merely idealize built forms; not only do his images enable the architects he works with to "refine and amplify" the ideas within their built works, and thus aid them in defining their next work, but it also seeks to advocate architecture for all: "My work as a photographer is predicated on a desire to [...] to be an advocate for design that elevates, to help construct an argument where good design isn’t an occasional, rare and special thing but an everyday, routine and expected event." Read the whole interview and see more of Soar's fantastic images, after the break

Amin Taha Golden Lane. Image © Timothy Soar Coffey Architects' Folded House. Image © Timothy Soar AHMM Barbican. Image © Timothy Soar PH+, Orsman Road. Image © Timothy Soar +29

A Biennale of Knowledge: Rem Koolhaas on The Importance of the Archive

00:00 - 12 June, 2014

Curated by Rem Koolhaas, this year’s Biennale set high expectations in the architecture world, a fact reflected in the massive attendance during the preview. As Koolhaas stated at the awards ceremony, he took on the hard task of reinventing the Biennale, recognizing its influence in how architecture is exhibited around the world.

Under the title “Fundamentals,” Rem rallied this year’s curators to assemble a vast amount of knowledge, bringing to light research that had been hidden, forgotten, scattered, and/or previously unexamined, and making it available to the larger architectural community. This was achieved not only in the form and content of the Biennale, but also in the numerous publications produced by the curators (a practice which closely follows OMA/AMO traditions).

Yet this is actually a double-edged sword; in many pavilions, the density and depth of the content made it hard to understand at first glance. Architecture festivals and exhibitions tend to lean on experiential one-liners, but since “Fundamentals” was so focused on conveying ideas about architecture’s relationship to modernity over the past 100 years, it was a significant challenge to the curators. Many pavilions produced impressive publications, so that all the rich knowledge they unearthed may continue to influence architectural thought long after the Biennale ends in November.

House in Funabashi / Koji Hatano Architects

01:00 - 12 June, 2014
House in Funabashi / Koji Hatano Architects, © Asako Yamazaki
© Asako Yamazaki

© Asako Yamazaki © Asako Yamazaki © Asako Yamazaki © Asako Yamazaki +16

Inside Korea's “Crow's Eye View” – Golden Lion Winner at the Venice Biennale 2014

01:00 - 12 June, 2014
Inside Korea's “Crow's Eye View” – Golden Lion Winner at the Venice Biennale 2014, Crow's Eye View: The Korean Peninsula. Image © Nico Saieh
Crow's Eye View: The Korean Peninsula. Image © Nico Saieh

Today, the Korean Peninsula provides a striking example of a post-war polarization: two opposite political and economical systems, constantly presented in contrast/conflict by the global media, that still maintain an intricate, complicated relationship. Architecture’s role in this polarization was instrumental. North Korea sought to represent the aspirations of a new communist nation within a context devastated after the war -- a tabula-rasa from which adaptations of modernism could appear. In South Korea, fast economic growth bred a form of modernization that represented the ideals of a globalized world.

These distinct absorptions of modernity, and the relation between the two neighboring nations, are represented in Korea’s Pavilion in an exhibition called Crow’s Eye View, winner of the Gold Lion at the Venice Biennale 2014.  The dense exhibition, commissioned and curated by Minsuk Cho together with Hyungmin Pai and Changmo Ahn, used every corner of the pavilion to represent this subject. The curators invited a multidisciplinary group of architects, urbanists, poets, writers, artists, photographers, film-makers, curators and collectors to demonstrate (to best of their availability, since official cooperation with North Korean institutions proved impossible) the architectural intersections and divisions between North and South Korea.

Recognized by the judges as “research in action,” Crow’s Eye View provided an invaluable addition to a discourse which has been predominantly carried by Western-centric narratives. And it is precisely this that, according to rumors, made it Koolhaas’ favorite pavilion.

Crow's Eye View: The Korean Peninsula. Image © Nico Saieh Crow's Eye View: The Korean Peninsula. Image © Nico Saieh Crow's Eye View: The Korean Peninsula. Image © Nico Saieh Crow's Eye View: The Korean Peninsula. Image © Nico Saieh +20

Holcim Foundation Announces Jury for 2015 Global Award

00:00 - 12 June, 2014
Holcim Foundation Announces Jury for 2015 Global Award, Courtesy of Holcim Foundation
Courtesy of Holcim Foundation

The Holcim Foundation has announced the global jury for the 2015 Holcim Awards, its triennial prize which encourages architects, planners, engineers, project owners and students to share their projects and visions that "go beyond conventional notions of sustainable construction."

The 2015 prize is the Holcim Foundation's fourth cycle, and this year will feature a total prize fund of $2 million - a significant increase on their 2012 prize fund of $300,000. To oversee the awards, they have recruited independent experts of international stature, including the Deans of the Harvard Graduate School of Design and ETH Zurich, and Alejandro Aravena of Chilean practice Elemental.

Read on after the break for the full list of jurors and more on the prize

"Live Work Play": An Exhibition of Local Award Winning Architecture from South England

00:00 - 12 June, 2014
"Live Work Play": An Exhibition of Local Award Winning Architecture from South England, Courtesy of Live Work Play
Courtesy of Live Work Play

Live Work Play, an exhibition organised as part of the Hampshire Festival of Architecture 2014 (UK), showcases over 100 projects from "within the country, the UK, and beyond." Featuring a range of "thoughtful, robust, elegant and ingenious designs", the show will include designs from local practices such as PAD Studio, Design Engine, AR Design Studio, Design ACB and John Pardey Architects. The exhibition will be open seven days a week between the 14th June and the 16th July. Find out more from RIBA Hampshire.

In Defense of Locatecture: Why We Should Move Away From Globalized Models Of Architecture

00:00 - 11 June, 2014
In Defense of Locatecture: Why We Should Move Away From Globalized Models Of Architecture, Gherkin, left. Hearst Tower, right. "Norma Foster's Hearst Tower in New York seems less at home than does Britain's 'Gherkin' in London"
Gherkin, left. Hearst Tower, right. "Norma Foster's Hearst Tower in New York seems less at home than does Britain's 'Gherkin' in London"

"Today, European architects regularly work in the United States, Americans work in Europe, and everybody works in Asia. This globalization of architecture would seem like a good thing for us and it's obviously good for (many) architects. [...] Architecture, however, is a social art, rather than a personal one, a reflection of society and its values rather than a medium of individual expression. So it's a problem when the prevailing trend is one of franchises particularly those of the globe trotters: Renzo, Rem, Zaha and Frank. It's exciting to bring high-powered architects in from the outside. [...] But in the long-run it's wiser to nurture local talent; instead of starchitects, locatects."

Swedish Team Win Urban Design Competition in Trenčín

01:00 - 11 June, 2014
Swedish Team Win Urban Design Competition in Trenčín, First Place. Image Courtesy of City of Trenčín
First Place. Image Courtesy of City of Trenčín

Swedish based Mandaworks + Hosper Sweden have recently won an international competition to find the "best comprehensive urbanistic proposals for connecting the city centre of Trenčín with both waterfronts of the River Váh." The winning scheme - Tracing Trenčín - "is not a proposal which is noticeably stunning" but is, according to Thomas Matta, deputy chair of the jury, "considerate to the existing structure of the historic core of the city."

Benois House / nps tchoban voss

01:00 - 11 June, 2014
Benois House  / nps tchoban voss, ©  Roland Halbe
© Roland Halbe

Courtesy of nps tchoban voss © Christian Gahl © Christian Gahl © Christian Gahl +10

Mini Shopping Mall Takes Top Prize in CANactions Youth Competition

00:00 - 11 June, 2014
Mini Shopping Mall Takes Top Prize in CANactions Youth Competition, Courtesy of Valentyn Sharovatov
Courtesy of Valentyn Sharovatov

The top prize in CANactions' 2014 Youth Competition has been awarded to Valentyn Sharovatov of Unika Architecture & Urbanism, for his "Extrasmall Shopping Mall", a design for a miniature shopping center on a tight site on Lviv. CANactions is Ukraine's largest architectural event, running since 2008.

The design by Sharovatov activates a neglected public square, using the draw of cafes and retail to regenerate this small corner of Lviv. More on the design after the break.

Three Projects That Transform Low-Tech Materials Into Innovative Design

01:00 - 11 June, 2014
Three Projects That Transform Low-Tech Materials Into Innovative Design, Top: Educational Building In Mozambique / Bergen School of Architecture Students. Middle: School Library Gando  / Kere Architecture. Bottom: Umubano Primary School / MASS Design Group
Top: Educational Building In Mozambique / Bergen School of Architecture Students. Middle: School Library Gando / Kere Architecture. Bottom: Umubano Primary School / MASS Design Group

The following article is presented by Materials, ArchDaily's new US product catalog.

How many times in the last year have you heard 3d printing mentioned? What about double-skinned curtain walls or “smart” buildings? High-tech materials almost always seem to dominate the conversation - at least in architectural circles. But using the latest invention in material technology usually does not make a building “innovative.” More often than not, it just makes it expensive and flashy. 

Low-tech materials like lumber, stone and brick, on the other hand, are often overlooked, even though the use of local and locally produced materials offers the lowest possible carbon footprint. And while these common materials may seem boring, with a bit of imagination and technical skill, an architect can transform these materials into something fresh. With that in mind, check out three truly innovative projects which use low-tech materials in different and exciting ways.

Chasing Rem: One Journalist's Journey to Pin Down Koolhaas

00:00 - 11 June, 2014
Chasing Rem: One Journalist's Journey to Pin Down Koolhaas, © Gili Merin
© Gili Merin

The following article was originally published on Medium.

On a perfect autumn morning Rem Koolhaas parks his black 1998 BMW along an Amsterdam canal. It’s not really a sports car, but rather the racing model that a child would draw. Moments later, he is placed behind an impressive desk. This is to be a normal working day. Not in his Rotterdam offices though. Today he deals with his appointments in an Amsterdam hotel. Does that sometimes, more efficient. But this morning, a journalist has been in front of him for more than half an hour. And the guy is saying what?

‘Just about everyone responds the same when I mention your name: He’s a very unpleasant man, right?
Halfway this remark Koolhaas leans back and moves away from the desktop.
He rocks back and forth.
And he nods.
Stuttering he says something like: ‘Yeah, that happens, yes. With people, yes.’
He seems embarrassed, even a little ashamed.
Outside assistants, clients, projects, calls about million dollar projects on different continents are waiting, but here, his head is so nude… those little ears that stick out to the sides… Can you describe a man of six feet tall as resembling a little injured bird?
Not much more comes out of him. The conversation is over.

Divergence House / FOS

01:00 - 11 June, 2014
Divergence House / FOS, © Teerawat Winyarat
© Teerawat Winyarat
  • Architects

  • Location

    Bangkok, Thailand
  • Design Team

    Makakrai Jay Suthadarat, Singha Ounsakul, Parinwath Yingvong
  • Area

    600.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

© Teerawat Winyarat © Teerawat Winyarat © Teerawat Winyarat © Teerawat Winyarat +48