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Tiny Houses

6 Tips for Designing and Building a Tiny House

09:30 - 2 April, 2018
6 Tips for Designing and Building a Tiny House, <a href='https://www.archdaily.com/420623/portable-house-aph80-abaton-arquitectura'>Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura</a>. Image © Juan Baraja
Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura. Image © Juan Baraja

Tiny houses have become popular in recent years as housing prices continue to soar. Whether as an off-the-grid retreat or a way to live more simply and economically, tiny homes offer a more flexible way to live. They are even being used by charity organizations such as the Tiny Homes Foundation in Australia as a way to tackle the issue of homelessness in cities and the need for social housing. As the popularity and need for tiny homes become ever more prevalent, knowing the necessary skills to design a tiny house for yourself or a client is a useful skill to have.

Below are 6 tips to keep in mind when designing and building a tiny house:

<a href='https://www.archdaily.com/790996/koda-kodasema'>KODA / Kodasema</a>. Image © Paul Kuimet <a href='https://www.archdaily.com/476916/minimod-mapa'>Minimod / MAPA</a>. Image © Leonardo Finotti <a href='https://www.archdaily.com/379927/micro-house-studio-liu-lubin'>Micro-house / Studio Liu Lubin</a>. Image Courtesy of Studio Liu Lubin <a href='https://www.archdaily.com/420623/portable-house-aph80-abaton-arquitectura'>Portable House ÁPH80 / Ábaton Arquitectura</a>. Image © Juan Baraja + 10

small home BIG LIFE 2018

12:25 - 17 January, 2018
small home BIG LIFE 2018

The Small house trend is here! We invite Victorian TAFE and University students studying either building design or architecture (full time or part time) to design and submit an innovative response to living in 45m2, 60m2 or 100m2. Go our our website for competition details and to register.

5 Very Different Ways to Finance the Construction of Tiny Houses

09:30 - 5 January, 2018
5 Very Different Ways to Finance the Construction of Tiny Houses, This tiny house in the woods can be rented via Getaway. Image © Roderick Aichinger
This tiny house in the woods can be rented via Getaway. Image © Roderick Aichinger

This article originally appeared on Archipreneur as "5 Amazing Tiny Houses and Their Financing Models."

The tiny house movement is taking the housing market by storm, with small homes appearing all over rural and urban areas across the world. They are an affordable and eco-conscious solution to the narrowing housing supply and can offer mobility to an increasing population of young professionals. Tiny houses come in many forms and sizes—from micro-apartments and office spaces, to cabins on wheels and trailers. Similarly, the financing models vary, depending on function, local building codes, size requirements and whether they’re made as commercial products or private housing solutions.

The best option is to design and build the house yourself, using savings instead of worrying about interest rates and debt. Some tiny house manufacturers offer in-house payment solutions to their customers. Other options are RV loans, peer-to-peer lending and crowdfunding. We assembled a list of 5 beautiful tiny houses built for different purposes.

You Can Now Buy a Shipping-Container Tiny House from Amazon (But Should You?)

09:30 - 1 November, 2017
You Can Now Buy a Shipping-Container Tiny House from Amazon (But Should You?), via Amazon
via Amazon

The conversion of shipping containers to living spaces is not a new concept—but being able to purchase them online and have them delivered by e-commerce giant Amazon is. Deliveries by the Seattle-based (and seemingly endlessly expanding) company are becoming a staple for most American households: dogs have never barked so much at the postman, porches have never been so littered with empty boxes, and never before has almost every product on the market been available from one place without even having to leave the house.

In spite of this consumer revolution, homes on demand constitutes new territory for the platform. So what does it look like when an entire house is delivered on the back of a truck?

Now You Can Assemble Your Own Tiny House for Outdoor Recreation

14:00 - 2 October, 2016
Now You Can Assemble Your Own Tiny House for Outdoor Recreation, © Leckie Studio
© Leckie Studio

Vancouver-based Leckie Studio Architecture + Design has founded the Backcountry Hut Company to bring affordable recreation structures to outdoor enthusiasts. Inspired by IKEA's philosophy of providing superior design at a moderate price point, the prefabricated hut prototype aims to embody the company's four cornerstones: function, quality, sustainability, and value.

© Leckie Studio © Leckie Studio © Leckie Studio © Leckie Studio + 6

A Tiny Luxury: What are “Tiny Houses” Really Saying About Architecture?

09:30 - 15 July, 2016
A Tiny Luxury: What are “Tiny Houses” Really Saying About Architecture?, © Roderick Aichinger
© Roderick Aichinger

Following a successful pilot launch in Boston and $1 million in venture backing, a startup company called Getaway has recently launched their service to New Yorkers. The company allows customers to rent out a collection of designer “tiny houses” placed in secluded rural settings north of the city; beginning at $99 per night, the service is hoping to offer respite for overstimulated city folk seeking to unplug and “find themselves.” The company was founded by business student Jon Staff and law student Pete Davis, both from Harvard University, out of discussions with other students about the issues with housing and the need for new ideas to house a new generation. From that came the idea of introducing the experience of Tiny House living to urbanites through weekend rentals.

Inspired by the notion of micro-housing and the powerful rhetoric of the Tiny House movement, initiatives like Getaway are part of a slew of architectural proposals that have emerged in recent years. Downsizing has been cited by its adopters as both a solution to the unaffordability of housing and a source of freedom from the insidious capitalist enslavement of “accumulating stuff.” Highly developed and urbanized cities such as New York seem to be leading the way for downsizing: just last year, Carmel Place, a special micro-housing project designed by nARCHITECTS, was finally completed in Manhattan to provide studio apartments much smaller than the city’s current minimum regulation of 400 square feet (37 square meters). Many, including Jesse Connuck, fail to see how micro-housing can be a solution to urban inequality, yet if we are to judge from the early success of startups like Getaway, micro-architecture holds widespread public appeal. Isn’t user satisfaction the ultimate goal of architecture? In that case, it’s important to investigate the ingenuity behind these undersized yet often overpriced spaces.

© thebearwalk.com © Kataram Studios © Roderick Aichinger © Kataram Studios + 26

5 Things Architecture Can Learn from the Tiny House Movement

09:30 - 1 September, 2015
5 Things Architecture Can Learn from the Tiny House Movement, © Flickr CC user Tammy Strobel
© Flickr CC user Tammy Strobel

As the global economy grows uncertain, homeowners are getting more creative in order to afford essential residential spaces. The tiny house movement has gained a foothold worldwide, encouraging the construction of homes as small as 150 square feet (14 square meters), with many smaller housing models cropping up on a daily basis. Home to residents of all ages, tiny houses have evolved far beyond the cramped quarters of Airstream trailers of decades past and, though they were once considered an architectural farce, tiny houses are becoming an increasingly popular solution to weather the economic storm and increasingly relevant to the field of architecture.

With their increasing respectability - and their popularity increasingly exposing the drawbacks of other housing types - we take a look at some lessons that while key to the tiny house movement, are still applicable in the larger architectural arena. Read on to find out what tiny houses can contribute to the race for better space.

5 Things the Tiny House Movement Can Learn from Post War Architecture

09:30 - 9 August, 2015
5 Things the Tiny House Movement Can Learn from Post War Architecture, © Flickr CC user Tammy Strobel
© Flickr CC user Tammy Strobel

One of the many problems with being deeply engaged in a niche subject such as architecture is that you can easily lose sight of what a "normal" person's perspective is on a topic. Through experience, we often assume that a rising trend that we notice on a daily basis has passed completely unnoticed by the general populace, and it's usually difficult to see when a topic has reached the critical mass to become a genuine social phenomenon. So imagine my surprise when I saw a joke about an architectural trend on a popular webcomic. Two months ago, Toothpaste For Dinner published an image of a character smugly telling his friend "that's cool... my Tiny House is a lot smaller, of course" as they tower over a comically small abode. Suddenly it became clear to me that the Tiny House movement was not just a curiosity for architects.

This realization leads to a number of questions: why are Tiny Houses such a big deal? What promise do they hold for society? And is there anything the movement is failing to address? These questions led me to conclude that, for better or worse, the Tiny House movement might just be the closest thing we have right now to a utopian housing solution - and if that's true, then the movement has a big task on its hands.

Finnish Student Olli Enne's prototype for a small, prefabricated home which can fill leftover space within existing neighborhoods. Image © Marko Laukkarinen A two-story WikiHouse produced for last year's London Design Festival. Image © Margaux Carron www.margauxcarron.com Design for HiveHaus, a modular home featured on the UK television show "George Clarke's Amazing Spaces". Image via Hivehaus Quixote Village in Olympia, Washington. Image © Leah Nash for BuzzFeed + 10

Tiny-House Villages: Safe Havens for the Homeless

00:00 - 24 January, 2015
Tiny-House Villages: Safe Havens for the Homeless, Quixote Village. Image © Leah Nash for BuzzFeed
Quixote Village. Image © Leah Nash for BuzzFeed

As the need for smart housing solutions rises, so does the appeal of tiny-house villages, not just as shelter for the homeless, but as a possible look to the future of the housing sector. The new article, Are Tiny-House Villages The Solution To Homelessness? by Tim Murphy, takes a closer look into the positive and negative aspects of these controversial communities, as well as their social and political ramifications so far. Through interviews with residents of several tiny-house villages, Murphy investigates the current impacts they have had on the homeless populations within major American cities, and questions how the lifestyle will evolve in the future. Read the full article, here.

Big Ideas, Small Buildings: Some of Architecture's Best, Tiny Projects

01:00 - 15 May, 2014
Big Ideas, Small Buildings: Some of Architecture's Best, Tiny Projects, Suzuko Yamada, Pillar House, Tokyo, Japan. Image © Iwan Baan/TASCHEN
Suzuko Yamada, Pillar House, Tokyo, Japan. Image © Iwan Baan/TASCHEN

This post was originally published in The Architectural Review as "Size Doesn't Matter: Big Ideas for Small Buildings."

Taschen’s latest volume draws together the architectural underdogs that, despite their minute, whimsical forms, are setting bold new trends for design.

When economies falter and construction halts, what happens to architecture? Rather than indulgent, personal projects, the need for small and perfectly formed spaces is becoming an economic necessity, pushing designers to go further with less. In their new volume Small: Architecture Now!, Taschen have drawn together the teahouses, cabins, saunas and dollhouses that set the trends for the small, sensitive and sustainable, with designers ranging from Pritzker Laureate Shigeru Ban to emerging young practices.

Terunobu Fujimori, Beetle's House, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK. Image Courtesy of Victoria and Albert Museum, London/TASCHEN Jorge Gracia, Endémico Resguardo Silvestre, Valle de Guadalupe, Ensenada, Mexico. Image © Undine Pröhl/TASCHEN Kota Mizuishi, Riverside House Suginami, Tokyo, Japan. Image © Hiroshi Tanigawa/TASCHEN Olson Kundig, Delta Shelter, Mazama, Washington, USA. Image © Olson Sundberg Kundig Allen Architects/TASCHEN + 14

Tiny Houses: Downsizing The American Dream

00:00 - 30 November, 2013

In the wake of the housing crisis and Recession, the "American Dream" of a super-sized home in the suburbs has lost its appeal; today, it's the "tiny house" that seems more aligned with America's readjusted ideals. Christopher Smith and Merete Mueller, a couple out of Colorado, are just one example of people taking the "tiny" leap - they began the construction of their 124 sq ft. home back in 2011, and their journey has been documented in a new film called "TINY: A Story About Living Small," which premiered on Al Jazeera America last Sunday.