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New Orleans: The Latest Architecture and News

“Make It Right” Goes Wrong in New Orleans

Some celebrate the failures of "Make It Right", Brad Pitt’s patronage in New Orleans. After Hurricane Katrina wrecked New Orleans in 2005, celebrated architects like Frank Gehry, David Adjaye and Thom Mayne created art for a foundation set up by Pitt. A local architect, John C. Williams was hired to turn designs from those starchitects into buildings with a directive to use the best sustainable materials available.

David Adjaye-Designed House Built by Brad Pitt’s Make It Right Foundation to Be Torn Down

A small but nevertheless significant building designed by David Adjaye in the Lower Ninth Ward for Brad Pitt’s Make It Right Foundation will be demolished because it has been deemed unsafe.

The city of New Orleans posted a “Notice of Emergency Demolition” on the vacant house at 1826 Reynes Street, saying that it is “in imminent danger of collapse and/or threat to life,” according to NOLA.com.

Jonathan Tate Talks Hurricanes, Homes, and Hotels

Architect Jonathan Tate was living and working in Memphis, Tennessee, when Hurricane Katrina ensnared New Orleans in 2005. Instinctively drawn to the Big Easy, he later moved there for the opportunity to observe the reconstruction effort and investigate architecture’s role in it.

The Schoolhouse / Rome Office

© Neil Alexander© Neil Alexander© Neil Alexander© Neil Alexander+ 25

Moody Pavilions / Trahan Architects

© Leonid Furmansky© Alexa Johnson© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky+ 12

Bienville House / Nathan Fell Architecture

© Justin Cordova
© Justin Cordova

© Justin Cordova© Justin Cordova© Justin Cordova© Justin Cordova+ 21

New Orleans, United States

Bastion Community Housing / OJT

© William Crocker© William Crocker© William Crocker© William Crocker+ 27

New Orleans, United States
  • Architects: OJT
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  56600 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: James Hardie, Sherwin-Williams, WeatherGard Windows

Starter Home* No. 4-15 Housing / OJT

© William Crocker© William Crocker© William Crocker© William Crocker+ 32

Trahan Transforms Atlanta’s Alliance Theatre with Advanced Fabrication

New Orleans-based Trahan Architects have wrapped the interior of Atlanta’s Alliance Theatre in steam-bent oak. Working with FARO and fabricators CW Keller, the team was inspired by the style of furniture and design artist Matthias Pliessnig. Led by founder Victor F. “Trey” Trahan and partner Leigh Breslau, the renovation has created a signature piece of cultural architecture for Atlanta.

Alliance Theatre. Image Courtesy of Trahan ArchitectsAlliance Theatre. Image Courtesy of Trahan ArchitectsAlliance Theatre. Image Courtesy of Trahan ArchitectsAlliance Theatre. Image Courtesy of Trahan Architects+ 9

When the Best Laid Plans Go Awry: What Went Wrong with New Orleans' Make It Right Homes?

This article was originally published on CommonEdge as "Rob Walker on the Mistakes of Brad Pitt's Make it Right."

I will start with a confession: I was part of the fawning media swarm that lauded and applauded the accomplishments of Make It Right, Brad Pitt’s bold attempt to rebuild a portion of the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans. The project was, it seemed once, one of the few post-Katrina success stories coming out of that flood-ravaged community.

The Shop at CAC / Eskew+Dumez+Ripple

© Neil Alexander
© Neil Alexander

© Neil Alexander© Neil Alexander© Neil Alexander© Neil Alexander+ 53

The Top 10 Inspirational Design Cities of 2018, As Revealed by Metropolis Magazine

In Metropolis Magazine's latest - and last - installment in their annual design cities review, the focus is not on output or culture but on cities themselves as the point of inspiration. For the designers surveyed, these were the cities that made their hearts beat a little faster; the ones that remained in their minds and wormed their way into their work.

Starter Home* No. 3 / OJT

© William Crocker© William Crocker© William Crocker© William Crocker+ 24

New Orleans, United States

Pecos County Safety Rest Area / Richter Architects

© Elizabeth Chu Richter© Craig Blackmon© Elizabeth Chu Richter© Craig Blackmon+ 23

New Orleans, United States
  • Architects: Richter Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  7600 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018

Crescent Park / Eskew+Dumez+Ripple

© Timothy Hursley© Timothy Hursley© Timothy Hursley© Timothy Hursley+ 40

  • Architects: Eskew+Dumez+Ripple
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Hess Lighting, Kone, City Elements, Contech Engineered Solutions, EcoSpace Low-rise, +4

The Standard New Orleans / Morris Adjmi Architects

© Neil Alexander© Neil Alexander© Neil Alexander© Neil Alexander+ 34

New Orleans, United States
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  244231 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Subzero, Wolf, Carrara marble, Cote France, Morris Adjmi, +2

An Architect’s Guide to New Orleans: 21 Unmissable Works of Architecture and Design

New Orleans is an architectural paradise. From Baroque to Modern, the buildings of New Orleans tell the story of a peculiar American city heavily influenced by its French, Spanish and Caribbean roots. Its diverse historical influences have impacted the urban fabric as much as the culture itself. A hub for celebratory gatherings such as bachelor and bachelorette parties, weddings, music festivals and Mardi Gras, Louisiana's largest and oldest city has long claimed tourism as a significant part of its vibrant economy.

The resilient city has a reputation for its food, music and focus on fun, but the infamous Katrina transformed New Orleans into an architectural conundrum: a problem to be solved and a chance for architects (from around the world) to contemplate the future of one of the United State’s biggest ports.