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Ad Architecture Classics: The Latest Architecture and News

5 Monuments to Progress

04:00 - 28 December, 2016
5 Monuments to Progress, Space Needle / John Graham & Company. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user Rattlhed (Public Domain)
Space Needle / John Graham & Company. Image Courtesy of Wikimedia user Rattlhed (Public Domain)

Buildings, perhaps unlike any other art form or edifice, have a capacity to influence or become part of a place's cultural identity and history. Defining an architectural monument is, however, an ambiguous exercise – most of their ilk only reach this status years after completion. AD Classics are ArchDaily's continually updated collection of longer-form building studies of the world's most significant architectural projects. Here we've assembled five structures and buildings which, often aside from original intentions, embody that most ephemeral feeling: a sense of progress.

AD Classics: Faculty of Architecture and Urbanism, University of São Paulo (FAU-USP) / João Vilanova Artigas and Carlos Cascaldi

15:00 - 12 November, 2016
© flickr Fernando Stankuns. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>
© flickr Fernando Stankuns. Used under Creative Commons

This piece of Brazilian architecture was conceived in 1961 by São Paulo architects João Batista Vilanova Artigas and Carlos Cascaldi. Together with the architectural movement of the Paulista School, they form part of the most important history of São Paulo, because of the large amount of works they constructed there and the recognition of many of them at an international level.

Luxury Living Through the Ages, From the Castle to the Villa

04:00 - 2 September, 2016
Luxury Living Through the Ages, From the Castle to the Villa, © Shutterstock user Naumenko Aleksandr
© Shutterstock user Naumenko Aleksandr

Although societies have transformed through the ages, wealth never truly seems to go out of style. That said, the manner in which it is expressed continually adapts to each successive cultural epoch. As a consequence of evolving social mores and emerging technologies, the ideal of “luxury” and “splendour” sees priorities shift from opulence to subtlety, from tradition to innovation, and from visual ornamentation to physical comfort.

AD Classics are ArchDaily's continually updated collection of longer-form building studies of the world's most significant architectural projects. In these ten examples of "high-end" residences, which represent centuries of history across three separate continents, the ever-changing nature of status, power and fine living is revealed.

© Kazunori Fujimoto Courtesy of Wikimedia user Wolfgang Moroder under CC 3.0 © Flavio Bragaia © Peter Aaron / OTTO + 10

10 Of The World's Most Spectacular Sacred Spaces

04:00 - 31 August, 2016
10 Of The World's Most Spectacular Sacred Spaces, Courtesy of Flickr user Flemming Ibsen under CC BY-NC 2.0
Courtesy of Flickr user Flemming Ibsen under CC BY-NC 2.0

Religion, in one form or another, has formed the core of human society for much of our history. It therefore stands to reason that religious architecture has found equal prominence in towns and cities across the globe. Faith carries different meanings for different peoples and cultures, resulting in a wide variety of approaches to the structures in which worship takes place: some favor sanctuaries, others places of education and community, while others place the greatest emphasis on nature itself. Indeed, many carry secondary importance as symbols of national power or cultural expression.

AD Classics are ArchDaily's continually updated collection of longer-form building studies of the world's most significant architectural projects. The collection of sacred spaces collated here invariably reveal one desire that remains constant across all faiths and cultures: shifting one’s gaze from the mundane and everyday and fixing it on the spiritual, the otherworldly, and the eternal.

Courtesy of Flickr user Arian Zweger under CC BY 2.0 Courtesy of Flickr user Futo-Tussauds under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 © Expiatory Temple of the Sagrada Familia Courtesy of Flickr user Naoya Fujii under CC BY-NC 2.0 + 10

10 Projects Which Define the Architecture of Transit

04:00 - 29 August, 2016
10 Projects Which Define the Architecture of Transit , Courtesy of Detroit Publishing co. via US Library of Congress (Public Domain)
Courtesy of Detroit Publishing co. via US Library of Congress (Public Domain)

Architecture inherently appears to be at odds with our mobile world – while one is static, the other is in constant motion. That said, architecture has had, and continues to have, a significant role in facilitating the rapid growth and evolution of transportation: cars require bridges, ships require docks, and airplanes require airports.

In creating structures to support our transit infrastructure, architects and engineers have sought more than functionality alone. The architecture of motion creates monuments – to governmental power, human achievement, or the very spirit of movement itself. AD Classics are ArchDaily's continually updated collection of longer-form building studies of the world's most significant architectural projects. Here we've assembled seven projects which stand as enduring symbols of a civilization perpetually on the move.

© Flickr user littleeve Courtesy of Wikimedia user A. Savin under CC BY-SA 3.0 © Satoru Mishima / FOA © Cameron Blaylock + 7

Cubes, Spheres and Inverted Pyramids: 10 Groundbreaking Residential Projects

12:30 - 29 July, 2016
Cubes, Spheres and Inverted Pyramids: 10 Groundbreaking Residential Projects, AD Classics: Bolwoning / Dries Kreijkamp. Image © Gili Merin
AD Classics: Bolwoning / Dries Kreijkamp. Image © Gili Merin

AD Classics are ArchDaily's continually updated collection of longer-form building studies of the world's most significant architectural projects. Here we've rounded-up ten groundbreaking residential projects from this collection, ranging from a 15th century Venetian palazzo to a three-dimensional axonometric projection. Although some appear a little strange, all have been realised and have made lasting contributions to the wider architectural discourse. You can study residential cubes, spheres and inverted pyramids—plus projects by the likes of OMA, Álvaro Siza, and Richard and Su Rogers—after the break.

AD Classics: Palazzo Santa Sofia / The Ca d’Oro

05:00 - 15 February, 2016
AD Classics: Palazzo Santa Sofia / The Ca d’Oro, The Ca d'Oro from the Grand Canal. Image © Wolfgang Moroder
The Ca d'Oro from the Grand Canal. Image © Wolfgang Moroder

Sitting on the northern bank of Venice's Grand Canal is a great house whose ornately carved marble facade only hints at its original splendor. The Palazzo Santa Sofia—or the Ca D’Oro (House of Gold), as it is also known—is one of the most notable examples of late Venetian Gothic architecture, which combined the existing threads of Gothic, Moorish, and Byzantine architecture into a unique aesthetic that symbolized the Venetian Republic’s cosmopolitan mercantile empire. Built to serve as the grand residence of wealthy Venetian businessman and politician Marin Contarini, the palazzo has seen a number of owners and renovations over its lifetime before ultimately coming to serve as a museum for medieval painting and sculpture.[1]

© Jean-Pierre Dalbera Image of the Ca d'Oro via shutterstock.com. Image via Shutterstock user InavanHateren Courtesy of Wikimedia user Madpack Courtesy of Wikimedia user Godromil + 10

AD Classics: Villa Malaparte / Adalberto Libera

06:00 - 4 January, 2016
AD Classics: Villa Malaparte / Adalberto Libera, © Flickr User: Sean Munson
© Flickr User: Sean Munson

Villa Malaparte, built in 1938 by the Rationalist architect Adalberto Libera in Punta Massullo on the Isle of Capri, is considered to be one of the best examples of Modern Italian architecture. The house, a red structure with inverted pyramid stairs, sits 32 meters over a cliff on the Gulf of Salerno. It is completely isolated from civilization, only accessible by foot or by boat.

The house was commissioned by the Italian writer, Curzio Malaparte whose eccentric character eventually led him to dominate the design process, causing serious conflict with Libera. Malaparte wanted the house to reflect his own personal character and become a place for solitary contemplation and writing. He once said: "Now I live on an island, in an austere and melancholy house, which I built myself on a lonely cliff above the sea. [It is] the image of my desire."

© Gloria Saravia Ortiz. PhD Arquitecta UPC Barcelona España.  Académica Escuela de Arquitectura Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. © Gloria Saravia Ortiz. PhD Arquitecta UPC Barcelona España.  Académica Escuela de Arquitectura Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. © Karl Lagerfeld © Flickr User: John Athayde + 15

AD Round Up: American Classics

11:00 - 4 July, 2015

Happy Fourth of July! In recognition of Independence Day in the United States, ArchDaily has assembled six of our favorite "American Classics." Featuring projects by Louis Kahn, Mies van der Rohe, Richard Neutra, Paul Rudolph, Eero Saarinen, and Richard Meier, each of these canonical works occupies a prominent place in twentieth-century American architecture. See them all after the break.

AD Round Up: Classics in Brick

11:00 - 30 January, 2015
AD Round Up: Classics in Brick, Colònia Güell / Antoni Gaudí. Image © Samuel Ludwig
Colònia Güell / Antoni Gaudí. Image © Samuel Ludwig

As one of the most ubiquitous forms of construction, it can sometimes be easy to overlook the humble brick. However, this prosaic building method can also be one of the most versatile materials available to architects, thanks to the experimentation of countless architects who, for centuries, have worked to create new forms of expression with the simple material. In this round up, we celebrate architects who, with their architectural classics, have expanded the possibilities of brick craft: Antoni Gaudí's fantastical vaulting at Colònia Güell and Alvar Aalto's experimental brick patterning at his house in Muuratsalo; the powerful brick piers of Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo's Knights of Columbus Building and the Catalan vaults of Porro, Garatti and Gattardi's National Arts School of Cuba; and finally, what brick round up would be complete without the brick-whisperer himself - Louis Kahn and his all-brick fortress for the Indian Institute of Management.

Muuratsalo Experimental House / Alvar Aalto. Image © Nico Saieh Knights of Columbus Building / Kevin Roche & John Dinkeloo. Image © Flickr: username- sftrajan The National Art Schools of Cuba / Ricardo Porro, Vittorio Garatti, Roberto Gottardi. Image © Norma Barbacci/World Monuments Fund Indian Institute of Management / Louis Kahn. Image © Wikimedia Commons + 7

AD Classics: Lafayette Park / Mies van der Rohe

01:00 - 11 December, 2013
AD Classics: Lafayette Park / Mies van der Rohe, © Jamie Schafer
© Jamie Schafer

Situated at the eastern edge of Downtown Detroit, Lafayette Park constitutes the world's largest collection of buildings designed by Mies van der Rohe. The 78-acre complex was completed in 1959, just after Crown Hall and the Seagram Building. It is not as well known as several Mies projects of that decade, however, and many critics argue the project deserves greater recognition. One of the first examples of urban renewal, it is a testament to the development's design that it remains a vibrant neighborhood more than fifty years after its construction.

AD Classics: Soreq Nuclear Research Center / Philip Johnson

01:00 - 8 July, 2013
AD Classics: Soreq Nuclear Research Center / Philip Johnson ,  Philip Johnson and Gideon Ziv, Sorek Nuclear Research Center, Israel, 1956-9 (from: Zvi Efrat, The Israeli Project: Building and Architecture 1948-1973)
Philip Johnson and Gideon Ziv, Sorek Nuclear Research Center, Israel, 1956-9 (from: Zvi Efrat, The Israeli Project: Building and Architecture 1948-1973)

American architect and Prizker Prize winner Philip Johnson - who would have turned 107 today - is well known for his contributions to 20th century architecture, from the modernist Glass House in 1949 to his later infamous post modernist AT&T building in 1984. But did you know that Johnson designed a brutalistic nuclear plant in Israel? More on this monolithic concrete structure after the break...

via www.soreq.gov.il Photo by Arnold Newman, via eng.archinform.net  Philip Johnson and Gideon Ziv, Sorek Nuclear Research Center, Israel, 1956-9 (from: Zvi Efrat, The Israeli Project: Building and Architecture 1948-1973)   Philip Johnson and Gideon Ziv, Sorek Nuclear Research Center, Israel, 1956-9 (from: Zvi Efrat, The Israeli Project: Building and Architecture 1948-1973)  + 12

AD Classics: Maison Louis Carré / Alvar Aalto

01:00 - 6 April, 2013
AD Classics: Maison Louis Carré  / Alvar Aalto, © Samuel Ludwig
© Samuel Ludwig

In the commune of Bazoches-sur-Guyonnes, about 40 kilometers southwest of Paris, sits one of the most important private houses designed by Alvar Aalto: Maison Louis Carré. The client, Louis Carré, was a prominent French art dealer who was also very interested in architecture. He desired a house that would be able to accommodate many guests for art viewings, but also incorporated a private component. He commissioned Aalto to design his house in 1956, and Louis Carré and his wife, Olga, were able to move into their new home three years later.

© Samuel Ludwig © Samuel Ludwig © Samuel Ludwig © Samuel Ludwig + 16

AD Classics: Silver Hut / Toyo Ito

01:00 - 19 March, 2013
© Tomio Ohashi. Courtesy of Toyo Ito & Associates
© Tomio Ohashi. Courtesy of Toyo Ito & Associates

Known for his conceptual designs, Japanese architect Toyo Ito is arguably one of the world’s most innovative architects. He began his architectural career with a project for his sister in 1976 called “The U House,” located in the center of Tokyo. The U House contained windows on the inside facing a courtyard instead of the typical outward-facing windows. This was Ito’s first experimentation with the ways that light enters buildings, and he expanded this idea to an even greater extent in his next project: the Silver Hut in Nakano, Tokyo.

Read about the Silver Hut after the break.

© Tomio Ohashi. Courtesy of Toyo Ito & Associates © Fujitsuka Mitsumasa. Courtesy of Toyo Ito & Associates © Tomio Ohashi. Courtesy of Toyo Ito & Associates © Tomio Ohashi. Courtesy of Toyo Ito & Associates + 6

AD Classics: Tower of Winds / Toyo Ito & Associates

01:00 - 18 March, 2013
AD Classics: Tower of Winds / Toyo Ito & Associates, © Tomio Ohashi
© Tomio Ohashi

© Toyo Ito and Associates © Toyo Ito and Associates © Toyo Ito and Associates © Flickr User ..colb.. + 9

The Tower of Winds is a project largely indicative of Toyo Ito's approach to architecture, particularly his belief in the importance of technology and its vital role in the future of architecture. The project not only embraces technology and involves it in a dialogue with the city, but also establishes a direct symbolic relationship between nature and the installation.

AD Classics: Marin Civic Center / Frank Lloyd Wright

01:00 - 14 March, 2013
AD Classics: Marin Civic Center / Frank Lloyd Wright, © Flickr User C.M. Keiner
© Flickr User C.M. Keiner

The Marin County Civic Center was Frank Lloyd Wright's last commission and largest public project, including several civic functions that would serve Marin County and San Francisco, which after the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge became closer than ever. Wright was selected for the project in 1957, winning a vote out of hope he would be able to best represent a democratic government open to the people through the Civic Center.

© Flickr User C.M. Keiner © Flickr User C.M. Keiner © Flickr User DB's travels © Flickr User DB's travels + 25

AD Classics: Casa del Fascio / Giuseppe Terragni

13:50 - 3 January, 2013
© Guillermo Hevia García
© Guillermo Hevia García

Casa del Fascio which sits in front of Como Cathedral is the work of the Italian Fascist architect Giuseppe Terragni. Built as the headquarters of the local Fascist Party, it was renamed Casa del Popolo after the war and has since served a number of civic agencies, including a Caribinieri station and a tax office.

© Guillermo Hevia García © Guillermo Hevia García © Guillermo Hevia García © Guillermo Hevia García + 27

AD Round Up: Classics Part VII

17:40 - 5 December, 2012