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PR Apartment / pianca+urano

© Manuel Sá© Manuel Sá© Manuel Sá© Manuel Sá+ 17

  • Architects: pianca+urano
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  100
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2016
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Casa Franceza, Colormix, Decas, Mekal

Sesc 24 de Maio / Paulo Mendes da Rocha + MMBB Arquitetos

© Nelson Kon© Nelson Kon© Nelson Kon© Nelson Kon+ 92

Ground Floor Restaurant IAB-SP / Gabriel Kogan + Guilherme Pianca

© Pedro Vannucchi© Pedro Vannucchi© Pedro Vannucchi© Pedro Vannucchi+ 31

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  210
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Aerovent Sistemas Ventilação e Melting - Anti Poluição e Ventilação, Equipamentos de Cozinha, Macom, Neobambu, Pedras Belas Artes, +3

AD Classics: University of Virginia / Thomas Jefferson

The end of the War of 1812 left the young United States of America awash with nationalist fervor. In the following years, the world’s first modern republic experienced unprecedented growth and prosperity; it was not without reason that the period came to be known as the “Era of Good Feelings.”[1] It was into this epoch of unbridled national pride that Thomas Jefferson, one of the country’s founding fathers and its third President, introduced his master plan for the University of Virginia: an architectural manifestation of the Enlightenment and republican ideals he had helped cultivate.

Ground floor plan and elevation of the Rotunda. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user FæPavilion X was the only pavilion of the ten to feature Corinthian design elements. ImageCourtesy of US Library of Congress (Public Domain)Courtesy of US Library of Congress (Public Domain)Courtesy of US Library of Congress (Public Domain)+ 37

AD Classics: Palazzo Santa Sofia / The Ca d’Oro

Sitting on the northern bank of Venice's Grand Canal is a great house whose ornately carved marble facade only hints at its original splendor. The Palazzo Santa Sofia—or the Ca D’Oro (House of Gold), as it is also known—is one of the most notable examples of late Venetian Gothic architecture, which combined the existing threads of Gothic, Moorish, and Byzantine architecture into a unique aesthetic that symbolized the Venetian Republic’s cosmopolitan mercantile empire. Built to serve as the grand residence of wealthy Venetian businessman and politician Marin Contarini, the palazzo has seen a number of owners and renovations over its lifetime before ultimately coming to serve as a museum for medieval painting and sculpture.[1]

© Jean-Pierre DalberaImage of the Ca d'Oro via shutterstock.com. Image via Shutterstock user InavanHaterenCourtesy of Wikimedia user MadpackCourtesy of Wikimedia user Godromil+ 10