All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Robert Polidori

BROWSE ALL FROM THIS PHOTOGRAPHER HERE

Airports: Examples in Plan & Section

07:00 - 28 June, 2019
Airports: Examples in Plan & Section, © Fabián Dejtiar
© Fabián Dejtiar

Airports require architectural solutions that not only respond to the efficiency of their spaces and circulations - both operational and passenger - but also to their connection with other transport systems and terminals.

Take a look at 10 airports/terminals and their plans and section below.

Tensile Structures: How Do They Work and What Are the Different Types?

07:00 - 18 March, 2018
Tensile Structures: How Do They Work and What Are the Different Types?, Munich Olympic Stadium / Behnisch and Partners & Frei Otto. Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Munich_-_Frei_Otto_Tensed_structures_-_5244.jpg'>© Jorge Royan via Wikimedia </a> License CC BY-SA 3.0
Munich Olympic Stadium / Behnisch and Partners & Frei Otto. Image © Jorge Royan via Wikimedia License CC BY-SA 3.0

Historically inspired by some of the first man-made shelters—such as the black tents first developed using camel leather by the nomads of the Sahara Desert, Saudi Arabia, and Iran, as well as the structures used by Native American tribes—tensile structures offer a range of positive benefits compared to other structural models.

Tensile structure is the term usually used to refer to the construction of roofs using a membrane held in place on steel cables. Their main characteristics are the way in which they work under stress tensile, their ease of pre-fabrication, their ability to cover large spans, and their malleability. This structural system calls for a small amount of material thanks to the use of thin canvases, which when stretched using steel cables, create surfaces capable of overcoming the forces imposed upon them.

Munich Olympic Stadium / Behnisch and Partners & Frei Otto. Image <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/eager/17094374255/in/album-72157651280449886/'>© 準建築人手札網站 Forgemind ArchiMedia via Flickr </a> License CC BY 2.0 Munich Olympic Stadium / Behnisch and Partners & Frei Otto. Image <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/eager/17094374255/in/album-72157651280449886/'>© 準建築人手札網站 Forgemind ArchiMedia via Flickr </a> License CC BY 2.0 National Stadium of Brasilia "Mané Garrincha" / Castro Mello Architects. Image © Bento Viana Millennium Dome / Richard Rogers (RSHP). Image <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/jamesjin/58712717/'>© James Jin via Flickr</a> License CC BY-SA 2.0 + 16

Zaha Hadid Architects to Design Navi Mumbai International Airport

11:10 - 14 March, 2018
Zaha Hadid Architects to Design Navi Mumbai International Airport, Previous airport works by Zaha Hadid Architects include the Beijing Daxing International Airport, slated as the world's largest airport terminal. Image Image by Methanoia © Zaha Hadid Architects
Previous airport works by Zaha Hadid Architects include the Beijing Daxing International Airport, slated as the world's largest airport terminal. Image Image by Methanoia © Zaha Hadid Architects

Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) has won an international competition for the design of the Navi Mumbai International Airport (NMIA). A long-awaited infrastructural project for India’s largest city, the scheme addresses capacity issues for the existing Chhatrapati Shivaji International (CSI) Airport, which features a terminal designed by SOM.

ZHA’s brief will encompass the design and execution of new NMIA terminal building, an Air Traffic Control Tower, and associated access. The airport will be situated across Mumbai Harbor, connected to the city by a planned rail link, and access to national rail networks. ZHA's previous work in the airport sector includes the Beijing Daxing International Airport (pictured), which is slated to be the world's largest airport terminal.

World Photo Day 2017: Our Readers’ 100 Most-Bookmarked Architectural Photographs

08:00 - 19 August, 2017

This August 19th is World Photo Day, which celebrates photography on the anniversary of the day on which France bought the patent for the daguerreotype, one of the earliest photographic processes, and released it to the world for free in 1839. At ArchDaily, we understand the importance of photography in architecture—not only as a tool for recording designs, but also as a discipline that many of us enjoy. To celebrate the occasion, we decided to reveal the most popular images ever published on ArchDaily, as selected by you, our readers. Using data gathered from My ArchDaily, we have ranked the 100 most-saved images from our database; read on to see them.

2015 World Design Rankings for Arts, Architecture and Design Announced

19:30 - 26 January, 2016
2015 World Design Rankings for Arts, Architecture and Design Announced

Every year the international A’ Design Award and Competition announces an arts, architecture and design ranking of countries based on the number of A’ Design Awards won by each country over the last six years. The A’ Design Award recognizes prominent designers and architects as well as architecture offices and businesses from countries around the world, with the 2015 awards featuring winners from 83 different nations.

Seeming Inevitability: Reconsidering Renzo Piano’s Addition To Louis Kahn’s Kimbell

08:30 - 25 May, 2015
South view. Image © Robert LaPrelle
South view. Image © Robert LaPrelle

When Renzo Piano’s addition to the Kimbell opened in late 2013, critical responses ranged from “both architects at the top of their games” (Witold Rybczynski) to “generous to a fault” (Mark Lamster) to “distant defacement” (Thomas de Monchaux). In this excerpt from a special issue of Cite: The Architecture + Design Review of Houston, Ronnie Self gives a deeply considered assessment of the two buildings after a full turn of the seasons. The special issue also includes a review by Christopher Hawthorne of Johnston Marklee's plans for the Menil Drawing Institute, a review by David Heymann of Steven Holl’s expansion of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and an essay by Walter Hood and Carmen Taylor about Project Row Houses. Also featured are interviews of the directors of all four museums and their architects (Piano, Holl, Johnston Marklee, David Chipperfield, and Rice Building Workshop), making for a very comprehensive issue.

Piano’s main task was to respond appropriately to Kahn’s building which he achieved through alignments in plan and elevation and by dividing his project into two major bodies: a concrete walled, glass roofed pavilion facing Kahn and a separate, sod-roofed structure behind that should integrate a significant portion of the project with the landscape and thereby lessen its overall impact. Still, the loss of the open lawn that existed in front of the Kimbell where Piano’s building now stands is regrettable. Kahn’s Kimbell was conceived as a large house or a villa in a park, and unlike much of the abundant open and green space in the Fort Worth Cultural District, that park was actually used. Piano’s new outdoor space is more like a courtyard – more contained and more formal. It is more urban in its design, yet less public in its use.

Aside from lamenting the loss of the open lawn, how might we judge the addition?

View of the double staircase leading to the lower level. Image © Robert Polidori View from the southwest. Image © Robert LaPrelle Lobby view, looking south. Image © Nic Lehoux Detail of roof and beam system. Image © Robert LaPrelle + 33

AD Round Up: Awesome Airports

00:00 - 13 July, 2014
AD Classics: Dulles International Airport / Eero Saarinen. Image © MWAA
AD Classics: Dulles International Airport / Eero Saarinen. Image © MWAA

If there is a universal truth, it is that nobody likes spending time in an airport. This article from the Financial Times corroborates this fact, pointing out that, no matter how well-designed a terminal is, people make every effort to leave it as soon as possible. While the novelty of air travel has worn off since its inception in the 20th century, the work devoted to designing airports has only increased. We’ve collected some of our favorite terminals we'd actually love to get stuck in, including works by Eero Sarinen, SOM, Fentress, J. Mayer H., KCAP, Paul Andreu, bblur architecture and 3DReid, Corgan Associates, De Bever, and Studio Fuksas. Enjoy!

Denver Union Station / SOM

01:00 - 20 May, 2014
Denver Union Station  / SOM, © Robert Polidori
© Robert Polidori

© Robert Polidori © Robert Polidori © Robert Polidori © Robert Polidori + 14

Piano Takes on Kahn at Kimbell Museum Expansion

01:00 - 22 November, 2013
Piano Takes on Kahn at Kimbell Museum Expansion, Renzo Piano Pavilion at Kimbell Art Museum. Image © Paul Clemence
Renzo Piano Pavilion at Kimbell Art Museum. Image © Paul Clemence

For architects, Louis Kahn's Kimbell Museum has long been hallowed ground. For Renzo Piano, who designed the museum's first major expansion, it was also an enormous difficulty to overcome. His addition to the museum could be neither too close to Kahn's building, nor too far. It had to solve a parking problem, yet respect Kahn's distaste for cars. It had to respond to Kahn's stately progression of spaces—and that silvery natural light that make architects' knees go wobbly. And yet it could not merely borrow from Kahn's revolutionary bag of tricks.

Kimbell Art Museum Expansion / Renzo Piano Building Workshop + Kendall/Heaton Associates

00:00 - 14 November, 2013
Kimbell Art Museum Expansion / Renzo Piano Building Workshop  + Kendall/Heaton Associates, © Nic Lehoux
© Nic Lehoux

© Nic Lehoux © Nic Lehoux © Nic Lehoux © Nic Lehoux + 50

The Park Hotel / SOM

00:00 - 11 July, 2011
The Park Hotel / SOM, © Bharath Ramamrutham
© Bharath Ramamrutham

© Pallon Daruwala © Robert Polidori © Pallon Daruwala © Bharath Ramamrutham + 25