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Hiroyuki Hirai

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Inside the Homes of Eight Famous Architects

Originally published in Metropolis Magazine as "Inside the Homes and Workspaces of 8 Great Architects", this article shows the spaces occupied by some of the best-known architects in the world. Documented for an exhibition that will be featured at the Milan Design Week 2014, the images give a glimpse inside the private worlds of some of our favorite designers.

It's a cliche that architects have messy workspaces. From chaos comes creation, so the phrase goes. But an upcoming exhibition at this year's Salone del Mobile intends to dispel the myth. Studio Mumbai.

Curator Francesca Molteni interviewed each of the designers in their private homes and came away with one finding: architects are actually quite tidy. The studios are all pristinely ordered; books are neatly stowed away, figurines and objets astutely displayed, and table tops swept clean. The photographs below are part of the exhibition materials, produced with the help of scenographer Davide Pizzigoni, which faithfully document the physical environments in images, video, and audio. These will be used to recreate the architects’ “rooms” at Salone del Mobile in April.

Where Architects Live is not limited to satisfying our curiosity about what these architects’ homes look like. Richard Rogers’ affirmation that “a room is the beginning of a city” resonates with the project’s aim in trying to articulate its subjects’ personal tastes and obsessions, and how those are reflected in their architectural work.

Read on to see more images of the inside of architects' homes and studios

© Davide Pizzigoni © Davide Pizzigoni © Romulo Fialdini © Davide Pizzigoni + 17

Shishi-Iwa House / Shigeru Ban Architects

© Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai + 14

Lodging  · 
Karuizawa, Japan
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project Shigeru Ban Architects
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2019

Mimosa Pudica / Horibe Associates

© Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai + 26

Residential  · 
Tokyo, Japan
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project Horibe Associates
  • Area Area of this architecture project
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2017

10 ArchDaily Projects That You Can Book Through Airbnb

ArchDaily and Airbnb were both founded in 2008, but for two very different reasons. Since then, ArchDaily has amassed a vast database of tens of thousands of buildings, located in cities and countries all around the world. Meanwhile, Airbnb has revolutionized the way in which we explore these countries, and use these buildings, even if just for one night.

While architecture lovers have occasionally been offered very limited experiences through Airbnb, such as a one-night stay on the Great Wall of China, or an architectural tour of the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Stadium courtesy of Kengo Kuma, it transpires that Airbnb’s listings contain some notable architectural gems available for regular booking.

Kubuswoningen / Piet Blom. Image © Dirk Verwoerd Ex of In House / Steven Holl Architects. Image © Paul Warchol Sky Pods / Natura Vive. Image © Airbnb VillaLóla / ARKÍS architects. Image © ARKÍS architects + 52

10 Images of Architecture Reflected in Water

This week we have prepared a selection of photographs in which reflections in water is used as the main compositional element. In these images, the surface qualities of the water play a fundamental role in giving the composition its final effect—either acting as a perfect mirror or giving a diffuse touch. Below is a selection of 10 images from prominent photographers such as Lu Hengzhong, Yao Li, and Nico Saieh.

© Nico Saieh © Yao Li © Lu Hengzhong © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG + 11

Spotlight: Shigeru Ban

Shigeru Ban (born August 5th 1957) is a Japanese architect who won the 2014 Pritzker Prize for his significant contributions in architectural innovation and philanthropy. His ability to re-apply conventional knowledge in differing contexts has resulted in a breadth of work that is characterized by structural sophistication and unconventional techniques and materials. Ban has used these innovations not only to create beautiful architecture but as a tool to help those in need, by creating fast, economical, and sustainable housing solutions for the homeless and the displaced. As the Pritzker jury cites: “Shigeru Ban is a tireless architect whose work exudes optimism.”

Nine Bridges Country Club. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai Oita Prefectural Art Museum. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai La Seine Musicale. Image © Boegly + Grazia photographers Curtain Wall House. Image © Hiroyuki Hirai + 17

10 Typologies of Daylighting: From Expressive Dynamic Patterns to Diffuse Light

Sunlight has proven to be an excellent formgiver, with which architecture can create dynamic environments. The lighting design pioneer William M.C. Lam (1924-2012) emphasized in his book “Sunlighting as Formgiver” that the consideration of daylight is about much more than energy efficiency. Architects have now found numerous ways of implementing sunlight and the questions arises whether a coherent daylight typology could be a valuable target during the design process. However, many daylight analyses focus mainly on energy consumption.

Siobhan Rockcastle and Marilyne Andersen, though, have developed a thrilling qualitative approach at EPFL in Lausanne. Their interest was driven by the spatial and temporal diversity of daylight, introducing a matrix with 10 shades of daylight.

HohBoh / +S Architect

© Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai + 20

Houses  · 
Saitama, Japan
  • Architects Authors of this architecture project +S Architect
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2015

Nominate Now: 2016 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards

2015 was an excellent year for ArchDaily. As we've continued to grow, we've delivered more information and tools to more people all around the world, leveling access to architectural knowledge and encouraging an exchange of ideas from professionals of diverse backgrounds, opening architectural up to everyone rather than just the privileged few.

Now for the 7th consecutive year, we are tasking our readers with the responsibility of recognizing and rewarding the projects that are making an impact in the profession with ArchDaily's 2016 Building of the Year Awards. By voting, you are part of an unbiased, distributed network of jurors and peers that has elevated the most relevant projects over the past six years. Over the next two weeks, your collective intelligence will filter over 3,000 projects down to just 14 stand-outs - the best in each category on ArchDaily.

This is your chance to reward the architecture you love by nominating your favorite for the 2016 Building of the Year Awards!

Full rules after the break.

Oita Prefectural Art Museum / Shigeru Ban Architects

© Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai + 11

Museum  · 
Ōita-shi, Japan
  • architects Authors of this architecture project Shigeru Ban Architects
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2015

JR Onagawa Station / Shigeru Ban Architects

© Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai + 32

Train Station  · 
Onagawa, Japan
  • architects Authors of this architecture project Shigeru Ban Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project
    600.0 sqm
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2015

Billboard / +S/Shintaro Matsushita+Takashi Suzuki + knit/Naohito Ikuta

© Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai + 17

Retail  · 
Suzuka, Japan
  • architects Authors of this architecture project +S/Shintaro Matsushita+Takashi Suzuki
  • Area Area of this architecture project
    442.0 sqm
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2014

SEPA / +S/Shintaro Matsushita+Takashi Suzuki

© Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai + 17

Houses  · 
Tokyo, Japan
  • architects Authors of this architecture project +S/Shintaro Matsushita+Takashi Suzuki
  • Area Area of this architecture project
    89.0 sqm
  • Project Year Brands with products used in this architecture project
    2014

The 14 Stories Behind the 2015 Building of the Year Award Winners

With our annual Building of the Year Awards, over 30,000 readers narrowed down over 3,000 projects, selecting just 14 as the best examples of architecture that ArchDaily has published in the past year. The results have been celebrated and widely shared, of course, usually in the form of images of each project. But what is often forgotten in this flurry of image sharing is that every one of these 14 projects has a backstory of significance which adds to our understanding of their architectural quality.

Some of these projects are intelligent responses to pressing social issues, others are twists on a well-established typology. Others still are simply supreme examples of architectural dexterity. In order that we don't forget the tremendous amount of effort that goes into creating each of these architectural masterpieces, continue reading after the break for the 14 stories that defined this year's Building of the Year Awards.

Material Masters: Shigeru Ban's Work With Wood

To celebrate the first anniversary of our US Materials Catalog, this week ArchDaily is presenting a three-part series on "Material Masters," showing how certain materials have helped to inspire some of the world's greatest architects.

Shigeru Ban’s portfolio is a strange dichotomy, split between shelters for natural disaster refugees and museums commissioned by wealthy patrons of the arts. Even stranger is the fact that, in both cases, Ban’s material palette frequently incorporates recycled cardboard, paper, and old beer crates. The Pritzker prize laureate is unique in this regard, and so great is his predilection for recycled paper tubes (originally formwork for concrete columns), that he has become known as the “Paper Architect.” His work receives media attention worldwide for the unorthodoxy of its construction materials. Yet Shigeru Ban is not concerned with unorthodoxy, but with economy. It is for this reason that, when paper tubes are deemed unsuitable, Shigeru Ban constructs his buildings in wood. Inspired by the architectural tradition of his native Japan, Ban is not only the "Paper Architect," but also one of the most famous architects working in wood today.

Concave Roof House No.2 / Jun Yashiki & Associates

© Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai + 12

Detached Floor House / Jun Yashiki & Associates

© Hiroyuki Hirai © Hiroyuki Hirai © Makoto Yoshida / Nikkei Architecture © Makoto Yoshida / Nikkei Architecture + 10