Ema Peter

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Wood Innovation Design Centre / Michael Green Architecture

© Ema PeterCourtesy of Michael Green Architecture© Ema Peter© Ema Peter+ 12

BC Passive House Factory / Hemsworth Architecture

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Pemberton, Canada
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1500
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2014
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Zehnder, Optiwin, Structurlam

AMS Nest / DIALOG + B+H Architects

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Vancouver, Canada
  • Architects: B+H Architects, DIALOG
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  11700
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2015
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: TAKTL

Sooke 01 House / Campos Studio

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Sooke, Canada
  • Architects: Campos Studio
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1480 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Duravit, Marvin, Ashley Norton, Standing Seam

Upper Skeena Recreation Center / Hemsworth Architecture

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Mount Royal University Taylor Centre for the Performing Arts / Pfeiffer

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Timber Trends: 7 To Watch for 2020

The history of timber construction stretches back as far as the Neolithic period, or potentially even earlier, when humans first began using wood to build shelters from the elements. The appearance of the first polished stone tools, such as knives and axes, then made wood handling more efficient and precise, increasing the thickness of wood sections and their resistance. Over the decades, the rustic appearance of these early constructions became increasingly orthogonal and clean, as a result of standardization, mass production, and the emergence of new styles and aesthetics.

Today we are experiencing another seminal moment within the evolution of timber. Nourished and strengthened by technological advances, new prefabrication systems, and a series of processes that increase its sustainability, safety, and efficiency, timber structures are popping up in the skylines of cities and in turn, is reconnecting our interior spaces with nature through the warmth, texture, and beauty of wood. Where will this path lead us? Below, we review 7 trends that suggest this progress is only set to continue, increasing both the capabilities and height of timber buildings in the years to come.

Gymnasium Régis Racine / Atelier d'Architecture Alexandre Dreyssé. Image © Clément GuillaumeCanoeing Training Base / PSBA + INOONI. Image © Bartosz DworskiHälleskogsbrännan Visitor Center / pS Arkitektur. Image © Jason Strong PhotographyLa Seine Musicale / Shigeru Ban Architects. Image Cortesía de Blumer Lehmann+ 25

De Blasio's Glass Skyscraper Ban: What Alternative Materials Could Take its Place?

Last April, Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York announced plans to introduce a bill that would ban the construction of new all-glass buildings. Part of a larger effort to reduce citywide greenhouse emissions by 30 percent, other initiatives included using clean energy to power city operations, mandatory organics recycling, and reducing single-use plastic and processed meat purchases. The announcement came on the heels of the city council passing the Climate Mobilization Act, a sweeping response to the Paris Climate Agreement that included required green roofs on new constructions and emissions reductions on existing buildings.

House on the Bench / Sturgess Architecture

Naramata, Canada
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  252
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017

Valve Headquarters / Clive Wilkinson Architects + JPC Architects

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Could Tall Wood Construction Be the Future of High-Rise Buildings?

Across the globe, tall wood structures have begun transforming the world of skyscrapers and high-rise buildings, ushering in an important shift to an architectural practice that has traditionally been dominated by steel and concrete. Typically defined as wood-constructed buildings over 14 stories or 50 meters high, the past six years have seen over 44 tall wood buildings built or underway around the world. Notable examples include Michael Green Architecture and DLR Group’s T3 and Team V Architectuur’s upcoming 73 meter residential tower HAUT.

Step House / Measured Architecture

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Vancouver, Canada

Is Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT) the Concrete of the Future?

Concrete, an essential building material, has for decades offered us the possibility of shaping our cities quickly and effectively, allowing them to rapidly expand into urban peripheries and reach heights previously unimagined by mankind. Today, new timber technologies are beginning to deliver similar opportunities – and even superior ones – through materials like Cross-Laminated Timber (CLT).

To better understand the properties and benefits of CLT, we talked with Jorge Calderón, Industrial Designer and CRULAMM Manager. He discusses some of the promising opportunities that CLT could provide architecture in the future. 

"KITERASU" Edificio modelo en CLT en la estación Kuse / ofa. Image © Ken'ichi SuzukiMINIMOD Catuçaba / MAPA. Image © Leonardo FinottiCapilla Sacromonte Landscape Hotel / MAPA Arquitetos. Image © Leonardo FinottiCortesía de Jorge Calderón+ 21

Airports: Examples in Plan & Section

Airports require architectural solutions that not only respond to the efficiency of their spaces and circulations - both operational and passenger - but also to their connection with other transport systems and terminals.

Take a look at 10 airports/terminals and their plans and section below.

Indoor Pools: Bringing the Tranquility of Water to Interiors

Within architecture, water evokes sentiments of calmness and wellbeing. The element has influenced design through its dynamic and fluid nature. With recent technological advances, architects have created some of the most strategic, innovative, and unexpected intersections of design and H2O.

Below, we have provided a roundup of indoor pools that highlight the application of water in different spaces, showing its relationship to materiality and use.

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© Mariela Apollonio© Yoshihiro Koitani + Aby Helfon y Ramón Helfon© Héctor Fernández Santos-Díez© Vinicius Nunes+ 30