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12 Women in Architecture Photography (Part 2)

08:00 - 20 February, 2018
12 Women in Architecture Photography (Part 2), © Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

Is there an aspect, a recurring mark, that reveals a difference in the way that male and female architecture photographers see the world? This is, perhaps, one of those rhetorical questions often used as an argument to shed light on works produced by women and for which there is no precise answer.

Without claiming to offer an answer to this question—and in order to follow up on our first article that showcased a selection of women in architecture photography—we present here a new compilation of professionals who deserve attention for the quality of their photographic work. See our list below:

11 Houses With Incredible Cantilevers

12:00 - 18 February, 2018
© Cécile Septet
© Cécile Septet

© Juan Solano © Ivan Hunter © Sergio Pirrone © Satoshi Asawaka + 12

Cantilevers, structures that protrude from a building without the need for supports, are highly popular not only for their dramatic aesthetic effect, but also for the demonstration of technical mastery involved in their development. But we rarely see cantilevers in housing. For this reason, in this installment of our Photos of the Week, we have made a selection of 11 houses that seem to defy the physical laws of construction. Keep reading to see photos of renowned photographers such as Cécile Septet, Ema Peter, and Juan Solano.

Pause / DBR | Design Build Research

15:00 - 10 January, 2018
Pause / DBR | Design Build Research, © Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

© Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter + 12

  • Architects

  • Location

    Vancouver Convention Centre West Building, 1055 Canada Pl, Vancouver, BC V6C 0C8, Canada
  • Area

    1000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Syncline House / Omar Gandhi Architect

13:00 - 25 November, 2017
© Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

© Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter + 21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Halifax Regional Municipality, Canada
  • Design Team

    Omar Gandhi, Peter Braithwaite, Elizabeth Powell, Devin Harper, Ozana Gherman
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Bench Accounting Office Interiors / Perkins+Will

15:00 - 21 July, 2017
Bench Accounting Office Interiors / Perkins+Will, © Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

© Kim Muise © Kim Muise © Ema Peter © Ema Peter + 18

  • Architects

  • Location

    545 Robson St, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
  • Lead Interior Designer

    Sarah Stanford
  • Design Team

    K. Baba, S. Brent, D. Dove, H. Lai, S. Stanford
  • Area

    4656.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Elevate / DBR | Design Build Research

09:00 - 4 June, 2017
© Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

© Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter + 12

  • Architects

  • Location

    Vancouver Convention Centre West Building, 1055 Canada Pl, Vancouver, BC V6C 0C3, Canada
  • Area

    807.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Sunset House / Mcleod Bovell Modern Houses

14:00 - 22 February, 2017
Sunset House / Mcleod Bovell Modern Houses, © Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

© Ema Peter          © Ema Peter          © Ema Peter          © Ema Peter          + 20

  • Architects

  • Location

    West Vancouver, Canada
  • Designers in Charge

    Matt Mcleod, Lisa Bovell
  • Area

    6300.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2015

T3 / Michael Green Architecture

11:00 - 6 January, 2017
T3 / Michael Green Architecture, © Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

© Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter + 13

  • Architects

  • Location

    Minneapolis, MN, United States
  • Architect in Charge

    Michael Green, Candice Nichol
  • Project Year

    2016

Elm Street Residence / James K.M. Cheng Architects

13:00 - 13 October, 2016
Elm Street Residence / James K.M. Cheng Architects, © Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

© Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter + 25

BC Passive House Factory / Hemsworth Architecture

13:00 - 23 June, 2016
BC Passive House Factory / Hemsworth Architecture, © Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

© Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter + 12

Telus Garden / Office Of Mcfarlane Biggar Architects + Designers Inc.

09:00 - 9 June, 2016
Telus Garden  / Office Of Mcfarlane Biggar Architects + Designers Inc., © Andrew Latreille
© Andrew Latreille

© Ema Peter © Andrew Latreille © Ema Peter © Andrew Latreille + 26

Surrey City Centre Library / Bing Thom Architects

15:00 - 8 June, 2016
Surrey City Centre Library / Bing Thom Architects, © Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

© Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter + 17

  • Architects

  • Location

    Surrey, BC, Canada
  • Architect in Charge

    Bing Thom Architects
  • Area

    82000.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2011
  • Photographs

The Compact Wooden City: A Life-Cycle Analysis of How Timber Could Help Combat Climate Change

10:45 - 2 June, 2016
The Compact Wooden City: A Life-Cycle Analysis of How Timber Could Help Combat Climate Change, Sou Fujimoto and Laisné Roussel's proposal for a tall wooden building in Bordeaux. Image © SOU FUJIMOTO ARCHITECTS + LAISNÉ ROUSSEL + RENDERING BY TÀMAS FISHER AND MORPH
Sou Fujimoto and Laisné Roussel's proposal for a tall wooden building in Bordeaux. Image © SOU FUJIMOTO ARCHITECTS + LAISNÉ ROUSSEL + RENDERING BY TÀMAS FISHER AND MORPH

Nowadays the main building materials used in the construction industry are concrete, steel and timber. From the point of view of ecological sustainability, there are four important differences between these three materials: first, timber is the only material of the three that is renewable; second, timber needs only a small amount of energy to be extracted and recycled compared to steel and concrete (but the implementation of its potential is not as developed yet); third, timber does not produce waste by the end of its life since it can be reused many times in several products before decomposing or being used as fuel and; and fourth, timber traps huge amounts of carbon from the atmosphere – a tree can contain a ton of CO2 [1] – and the carbon absorbed remains embedded as long as the wood is in use.

Considering the fact that 36 percent of total carbon emissions in Europe during the last decade came from the building industry,[2] as well as 39 percent of total carbon emissions in the United States,[3] the materiality of construction should be a priority for governments’ regulations in the future as measurements against global warming. The amount of CO2 in the atmosphere and the level of carbon emissions of the big economies across the globe are big issues that need to be solved with urgency in order to avoid larger, more frequent climate catastrophes in the future. The current regulation in several countries of the EU, which is incentivizing the use of renewable materials in buildings, is showing the direction the building industry in many other parts of the world should follow. And if these measures are adopted across the EU and beyond – if other countries start to follow this tendency as well – there will be significantly more wood in cities.

In order to raise awareness of tall wooden buildings, last year Michael Green Architecture reimagined the Empire State Building as a wooden structure. Image © Metsä Wood Limnologen in Växjö, Sweden. Image © Midroc Property Development Early construction of Acton Ostry Architects' Brock Commons Student Residence at the University of British Columbia. When complete in 2017, the 18-story building will be the world's tallest timber building. Image © Acton Ostry Architects Inc. & University of British Columbia Michael Green Architecture was part of a team that proposed the world's tallest wooden buildings as part of the Réinventer Paris competition. Image © MGA + 7

Janet Echelman Suspends Net Sculpture Over London's Oxford Circus

12:00 - 15 January, 2016
Janet Echelman Suspends Net Sculpture Over London's Oxford Circus, 1.8 London, Janet Echelman, Lumiere London 2016, produced by Artichoke, supported by the Mayor of London. Image © Ema Peter
1.8 London, Janet Echelman, Lumiere London 2016, produced by Artichoke, supported by the Mayor of London. Image © Ema Peter

London is the latest city to host one of Janet Echelman's stunning net sculptures. Suspended 180 feet above Oxford Circus, the city's busiest intersections, the colorful floating form was inspired by 1.8 - "the length of time in microseconds that the earth’s day was shortened" as a result of Japan's devastating 2011 earthquake and tsunami. 

"The sculpture’s form was inspired by data sets of the tsunami’s wave heights rippling across the entire Pacific Ocean," says the studio. "The artwork delves into content related to our complex interdependencies with larger cycles of time and our physical world. The sculpture’s net structure is a physical manifestation of interconnectedness – when any one element moves, every other element is affected."

UBC Bookstore / office of mcfarlane biggar architects + designers

17:00 - 26 October, 2015
UBC Bookstore / office of mcfarlane biggar architects + designers, © Ed White
© Ed White

© Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter + 24

St. Georges / Randy Bens Architect

13:00 - 6 October, 2015
St. Georges / Randy Bens Architect, © Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

© Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter + 15

AMS Nest / DIALOG + B+H Architects

10:00 - 21 September, 2015
AMS Nest / DIALOG + B+H Architects, © Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

© Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter + 13

  • Architects

  • Location

    The University of British Columbia, 2329 West Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada
  • Area

    11700.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

Houses at 1340 / office of mcfarlane biggar architects + designers

13:00 - 24 August, 2015
Houses at 1340 / office of mcfarlane biggar architects + designers, © Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

© Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter © Ema Peter + 18