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How to Incorporate Gardens in Home Design

Indoor gardens can contribute important benefits to home living, ranging from aesthetic beauty to improved health and productivity. Research has shown that indoor plants help eliminate indoor air pollutants called Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) that emanate from adhesives, furnishings, clothing, and solvents, and are known to cause illnesses. They also increase subjective perceptions of concentration and satisfaction, as well as objective measures of productivity. Indoor gardens may even reduce energy use and costs because of the reduced need for air circulation. These benefits complement the obvious aesthetic advantages of a well-designed garden, making the indoor garden an attractive residential feature on several fronts.

Courtesy of TAA DESIGN © BK © Rafael Gamo Hydroponic gardening. Image © Needpix user naidokdin + 42

What is Plantscaping?

© Nelson Kon © Quang Dam © Edward Hendricks © Helene Binet + 49

Interior gardens and plants produce many day-to-day benefits, like mood boosting and memory enhancing effects. Interior landscape design, also known as "plantscaping", is much more than the act of bringing plants indoors; it's actually about the strategic placement and selection of plant species within an architectural project to highlight and enhance aspects of spatial design.

The Greja House / Park + Associates

© Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks + 15

  • Architects: Park + Associates
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 392.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2014

30 Open Bathrooms: Incorporating Breeze and Nature in Private Space

The private space is usually associated with hiding what goes on inside, allowing people to have certain moments of intimacy. Habitually, bathrooms have been designed for this purpose, reducing openings to a minimum or — sometimes — eliminating them completely.

However, being such an important space within a building, bathrooms have become an object of new exploration for architects. By blurring the limits of privacy — without losing it completely — these spaces are open to the outdoors, allowing the breeze to enter. How does this new experience feel? Check out 30 open bathrooms that play with the feeling of exhibitionism, without fully revealing what is happening inside.

© Sean Fennessy © Luis Gordoa © Shannon McGrath TreeVilla at Forest Hills / Architecture BRIO. Image © Photographix + 37

Returning the Green / Park + Associates

© Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks + 20

  • Architects: Park + Associates
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 39443.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2017

VUE Hotel / Ministry of Design

Fabcafe. Image © Edward Hendricks Entrance Day. Image © Edward Hendricks Courtyard. Image © Edward Hendricks Lobby Reception. Image © Edward Hendricks + 54

Beijing, China
  • Interiors designers: Ministry of Design
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 10000.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2017

15 Incredible Photos of Architecture at Nighttime: The Best Photos of the Week

With Halloween just around the corner, this week we have prepared a special edition of Photos of the Week featuring nighttime images. Undoubtedly, this effect is among the most spectacular and difficult to achieve in architecture photography. Working in the absence of light is not a simple task for photographers, but by playing with the artificial lights in buildings (and, usually, some dramatic HDR effects) it is possible to achieve adequate exposure for incredible results. Below is a selection of 15 images from prominent photographers such as Ketsiree Wongwan, Laurian Ghinitoiu and Philippe Ruault.

© Marc Goodwin © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Ketsiree Wongwan © Virginia Cucchi + 16

The Nassim / W Architects

© Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks + 33

  • Architects: W Architects
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2015

World Photo Day 2017: Our Readers’ 100 Most-Bookmarked Architectural Photographs

This August 19th is World Photo Day, which celebrates photography on the anniversary of the day on which France bought the patent for the daguerreotype, one of the earliest photographic processes, and released it to the world for free in 1839. At ArchDaily, we understand the importance of photography in architecture—not only as a tool for recording designs, but also as a discipline that many of us enjoy. To celebrate the occasion, we decided to reveal the most popular images ever published on ArchDaily, as selected by you, our readers. Using data gathered from My ArchDaily, we have ranked the 100 most-saved images from our database; read on to see them.

Spotlight: Moshe Safdie

Habitat 67. Image © Canadian Architecture Collection, McGill University
Habitat 67. Image © Canadian Architecture Collection, McGill University

Theorist, architect, and educator Moshe Safdie (born July 14, 1938), made his first mark on architecture with his master's thesis, where the idea for Habitat 67 originated. Catapulted to attention, Safdie has used his ground-breaking first project to develop a reputation as a prolific creator of cultural buildings, translating his radicalism into a dramatic yet sensitive style that has become popular across the world. Increasingly working in Asia and the Middle East, Safdie puts an emphasis on integrating green and public spaces into his modernist designs.

Plan for Singapore's new "Air Hub". Image Courtesy of Safdie Architects National Medal of Honor Museum in Mount Pleasant, South Carolina. Image Courtesy of Safdie Architects Habitat 67. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Montreal_-_QC_-_Habitat67.jpg'>Wikimedia user Wladyslaw (taxiarchos228)</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts, Kansas City. Image © Tim Hursley + 13

House 24 / Park + Associates

© Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks + 15

  • Architects: Park + Associates
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 715.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2016

PRODUCE Workshop Debuts Plywood-based "Fabricwood" Pavilion for Herman Miller's Shop-in-Shop

Courtesy of PRODUCE Workshop
Courtesy of PRODUCE Workshop

Furniture and design retailer XTRA's new flagship store in Singapore's Marina Square includes a Herman Miller "Shop-in-Shop" that draws inspiration from the furniture it showcases. Encircling the space is a 20-meter arched structure that, from a distance, gives the appearance of tufted fabric pulled taught over a frame. But in fact, this structure is built from a plywood "skin" that designer Pan Yicheng of PRODUCE Workshop has dubbed "fabricwood."

© Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks Prototype of the Fabricwood system. Image Courtesy of PRODUCE Workshop Courtesy of PRODUCE Workshop + 29

22 Toh Yi Road / Ming Architects

© Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks + 16

Enabling Village / WOHA

© Patrick Bingham Hall © Edward Hendricks © Patrick Bingham Hall © Edward Hendricks + 26

  • Architects: WOHA
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2016

CTBUH Names Winners of 2016 Tall Building Awards

The Council on Tall Building and Urban Habitat have announced the winners of the 15th edition of the CTBUH Tall Building Awards. From over 100 submissions, the best buildings from four regions – the Americas, Asia & Australasia, Europe and Middle East & Africa – were selected, along with recipients of the Urban Habitat Award, the Innovation Award, the Performance Award and the 10 Year Award. The CTBUH will pick a global winner from the regional selections later this year.

The towers were chosen by a panel of architects from world-renowned firms and were judged on every aspect of performance, looking in particular for “those that have the greatest positive impact on the individuals who use these buildings and the cities they inhabit.”

Read on for the list of winners.

House with Screens / ADX Architects

© Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks + 21

  • Architects: ADX Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 360.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2016

Sky Habitat Singapore / Safdie Architects

© Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks + 15

  • Architects: Safdie Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 130000.0 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2015

1919 / Park + Associates

© Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks © Edward Hendricks + 13

  • Architects: Park + Associates
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 2325.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2015