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Mexico City

SCHULTZ Building / CPDA Arquitectos

11:00 - 11 September, 2018
© Jaime Navarro
© Jaime Navarro

© Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro + 24

  • Architects

  • Location

    Miguel E. Schultz 139, San Rafael, 06470 Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico
  • Construction

    Mocaa Arquitectos
  • Structural engineering

    Humberto Girón
  • Illumination design

    Luz y Forma
  • Area

    2800.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

María Ribera Dwellings / JSa

11:00 - 10 September, 2018
María Ribera Dwellings / JSa , © Luis Gallardo
© Luis Gallardo

© Luis Gallardo © Luis Gallardo © Luis Gallardo © Luis Gallardo + 16

  • Architects

    JSa
  • Location

    Nogal 187, Sta María la Ribera, Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico
  • Author Architects

    Javier Sánchez, Benedikt Fahlbusch
  • Design Team

    Milton Durán, José Barreto, Tadeo Ángeles, Francisco Martínez
  • Area

    31000.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Kumoto / Esrawe Studio + Rojkind Arquitectos

15:00 - 4 September, 2018
Kumoto / Esrawe Studio + Rojkind Arquitectos, © Jaime Navarro
© Jaime Navarro

© Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro + 8

  • Architects

  • Location

    Monte Everest 635, Lomas de Chapultepec V Secc, 11000, CDMX, Mexico
  • Design

    Esrawe Studio + Rojkind Arquitectos
  • Concept

    Héctor Esrawe, Michel Rojkind
  • Coordination

    Javier García-Rivera, Jorge Mdahuar
  • Area

    200.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

Asintelix Office / Ezequiel Farca + Cristina Grappin

13:00 - 17 August, 2018
Asintelix Office / Ezequiel Farca + Cristina Grappin, © Jaime Navarro
© Jaime Navarro

© Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro + 38

  • Architects

  • Location

    Mexico City, Mexico
  • Architect in charge

    Cristina Grappin
  • Other Participants

    Ezequiel Farca, Cristina Grappin, Manuel Medina
  • Area

    6447.58 ft2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

The Failed Mexican Earthquake Memorial That Shows Protest Can Still Shape the Urban Environment

09:30 - 25 July, 2018
The proposed memorial to earthquake victims in Mexico City met with fierce resistance from residents who felt authorities had not done enough for the people left homeless by the tragedy. Image via Common Edge
The proposed memorial to earthquake victims in Mexico City met with fierce resistance from residents who felt authorities had not done enough for the people left homeless by the tragedy. Image via Common Edge

This article was originally published by Common Edge as "Letter From Mexico City: An Insidious Memorial to a Still-Unfolding Tragedy."

You wouldn’t think it looking at Mexico City today—a densely populated metropolis, where empty space is hard to come by—but decades earlier, following a devastating earthquake on September 19, 1985, more than 400 buildings collapsed, leaving a collection of open wounds spread over the cityscape.

Exactly thirty-two years later, the anniversary of that disaster was ominously commemorated with an emergency evacuation drill. Then, in one of those odd occurrences in which reality proves to be stranger than fiction, a sudden jolt scarcely two hours after the drill led to what would be yet another of the deadliest earthquakes in the city’s history. Buildings once again collapsed, leaving a rising-by-the-hour death toll that eventually reached 361, as well as swarms of bewildered citizens wandering the streets, frantically attempting to reach their loved ones through the weakened cell phone reception. “We’d just evacuated for the drill,” people said, like a collective mantra. “How could this happen again?”

The Design of ARTZ Pedregal, a New Urban Center in Mexico City Designed by Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos

14:21 - 12 July, 2018
The Design of ARTZ Pedregal, a New Urban Center in Mexico City Designed by Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos, © Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos, render por Lighthouse 3D
© Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos, render por Lighthouse 3D

Note: This project was originally published in Spanish on ArchDaily on April 27, 2016. Due to the news of the project's partial collapse, we have translated the original post to provide more information in English.

Currently underway in Mexico City, the project by Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos inserts a new urban-scale project designed under environmental and social concepts to expand public spaces and the collective interaction in the south of the city. The volumetry of this mixed-use project that incorporates commercial developments, corporate towers and a large urban park.

"ARTZ is more than just a project, it is a space that improves the city and therefore the quality of life of its users," comments Javier Sordo Madaleno Bringas, president of SMA.

More information about the project is available below. 

Sitio under construction. © Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos, photos byr HH Fotografía © Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos, render por Lighthouse 3D Sitio under construction. © Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos, photos byr HH Fotografía © Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos, render por Lighthouse 3D + 28

Plaza Artz Pedregal Building by Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos Collapses in Mexico City

13:40 - 12 July, 2018

Videos circulating around social media show at least a partial collapse of Plaza Artz Pedegral, a project built in 2012 by the Mexican architecture office Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos. At the time of reporting the cause of the collapse has not yet been confirmed.

According to the online version of the Milenio newspaper, The Secretary of Civil Protection (secretario de Protección Civil) in Mexico City stated that, at the moment, there are no reports of people injured or trapped.

Video from 2016 shows part of the site collapsing around the roads adjoining the site.

The Chemistry of Kahlo Blue

14:45 - 18 June, 2018
The Chemistry of Kahlo Blue, Collage. Image Cortesía de Danae Santibáñez
Collage. Image Cortesía de Danae Santibáñez

Cortesía de Danae Santibáñez Arte prehispánico. Image Cortesía de Danae Santibáñez Cortesía de Danae Santibáñez Cortesía de Danae Santibáñez + 17

Before the monochromatic works of Yves Klein, who created the International Klein Blue (IKB), Frida's 'Kahlo Blue' already existed in Mexico City's core.

Pujol / JSa

11:00 - 17 May, 2018
Pujol / JSa, © Luis Gallardo
© Luis Gallardo

© Luis Gallardo © Luis Gallardo © Luis Gallardo © Rafael Gamo + 16

  • Architects

    JSa
  • Location

    Tennyson 133, Polanco, Mexico City
  • Lead Architects

    Javier Sánchez + Aisha Ballesteros + Micaela de Bernardi
  • Design Team

    Selene García, Alma Caballero, Mario I. Gudiño, Andrea Garín, Laura Natividad
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Vía Vallejo / Grow arquitectos

15:00 - 11 May, 2018
Vía Vallejo / Grow arquitectos, © Marcos Betanzos
© Marcos Betanzos

© Marcos Betanzos © Marcos Betanzos © Marcos Betanzos © Marcos Betanzos + 19

Mexico City's Controversial Airport Project Could Be a Preservation Site for a Collection of Modernist Murals

09:30 - 8 May, 2018
Mexico City's Controversial Airport Project Could Be a Preservation Site for a Collection of Modernist Murals, Centro SCOP in Mexico City was shuttered after a series of devastating earthquakes. A new exhibition proposes rehousing its historically significant murals. Image Courtesy of Pablo López Luz/ Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura
Centro SCOP in Mexico City was shuttered after a series of devastating earthquakes. A new exhibition proposes rehousing its historically significant murals. Image Courtesy of Pablo López Luz/ Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "How a Small Mexico City Exhibition Fueled a Debate About Preservation and Power."

It’s a slate-gray day in Mexico City’s Colonia Narvarte neighborhood and mounting gusts signal imminent rain. Centro SCOP, a sprawling bureaucratic complex, rises sharply against this bleak backdrop. The building is a masterful, if not intimidating, example of Mexican Modernism, an H-shaped assemblage of muscular concrete volumes designed by architect Carlos Lazo, covered in an acre-and-a-half of vibrant mosaic murals.

At its peak, the building accommodated more than 3,000 workers for the Secretariat of Communications and Transportation (SCT). Today, save a security guard in its gatehouse, it is empty.

As part of the Archivo exhibition, FR-EE has proposed relocating Centro SCOP's murals to the airport it is co-designing with Foster + Partners. Image Courtesy of FR-EE Fernando Romero Enterprises/ Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura An artist's rendering of Centro SCOP. Image Courtesy of Secretaría de Comunicaciones y Transportes (SCT)/ Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura An image of Centro SCOP, shortly after it opened in the mid 1950s. Image Courtesy of personal archive of Carlos Lazo Barreiro / Archivo General de la Nación/ Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura Juan O'Gorman's "Canto a La Patria (Parte 1)" (left) and "Independencia y Progreso" (right). Image Courtesy of Pablo López Luz/ Archivo Diseño y Arquitectura + 26

TLALPAN 590 Building / TALLER DEA + KOZ architectes

11:00 - 4 May, 2018
TLALPAN 590 Building / TALLER DEA + KOZ architectes, © Onnis Luque
© Onnis Luque

© Onnis Luque © Onnis Luque © Onnis Luque © Onnis Luque + 26

  • Architects

  • Location

    Calz. de Tlalpan 590, Moderna, City of Mexico, Mexico
  • Lead Architects

    Christophe Ouhayoun, Nicolas Ziesel, René Caro, Jesús López
  • Area

    6.677 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Common Unity / Rozana Montiel | Estudio de Arquitectura

15:10 - 11 April, 2018
Common Unity / Rozana Montiel | Estudio de Arquitectura, © Sandra Pereznieto
© Sandra Pereznieto

© Sandra Pereznieto © Sandra Pereznieto © Sandra Pereznieto © Sandra Pereznieto + 24

Meroma Restaurant / Oficina de Práctica Arquitectónica

17:00 - 6 April, 2018
Meroma Restaurant / Oficina de Práctica Arquitectónica, © Luis Young
© Luis Young

© Luis Young © Luis Young © Luis Young © Luis Young + 19

  • Architects

  • Location

    Roma, 06760 Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico
  • Architects in Charge

    Rosalía Yuste, Diego Mañón
  • Design Team

    Berenice Solis y David Ignorosa
  • Area

    160.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings

06:00 - 6 April, 2018
What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings, Han Zhang along with her team at <a href="http://www.archdaily.cn">ArchDaily China</a>. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang
Han Zhang along with her team at ArchDaily China. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang

There's an old, weary tune that people sing to caution against being an architect: the long years of academic training, the studio work that takes away from sleep, and the small job market in which too many people are vying for the same positions. When you finally get going, the work is trying as well. Many spend months or even years working on the computer and doing models before seeing any of the designs become concrete. If you're talking about the grind, architects know this well enough from their training, and this time of ceaseless endeavor in the workplace only adds to that despair.

Which is why more and more architects are branching out. Better hours, more interesting opportunities, and a chance to do more than just build models. Furthermore, the skills you learn as an architect, such as being sensitive to space, and being able to grasp the cultural and societal demands of a place, can be put to use in rather interesting ways. Here, 3 editors at ArchDaily talk about being an architect, why they stopped designing buildings, and what they do in their work now. 

Zempoala 267 Building / GDE Grupo Diseño y Espacios

13:00 - 19 March, 2018
© Angelica Ibarra
© Angelica Ibarra

© Angelica Ibarra © Angelica Ibarra © Angelica Ibarra © Angelica Ibarra + 21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Barranca del Muerto 561, Merced Gómez, 01600 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
  • Architects in Charge

    Rene Alberto Sinta Muñóz, Sebastian Sinta Silva
  • Collaborators

    Ana Paulina Roldán, Daniel A. Díaz Torres, Daniel Morales, David Balbuena, Erick F. García Sinta, Mariel Sinta Ramos, Melissa Gallegos, Miguel A. Vega Ruíz.
  • Area

    1253.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

B72 / Dosa Studio

10:00 - 10 March, 2018
B72 / Dosa Studio, © Marcos Betanzos
© Marcos Betanzos

© Marcos Betanzos © Marcos Betanzos © Marcos Betanzos © Marcos Betanzos + 16

  • Architects

  • Location

    Anzures, 11590 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
  • Architect in Charge

    Raúl Medina, Sergio Sousa, Abraham Servin
  • Area

    500.0 m2
  • Photograph

    Marcos Betanzos

Restaurant El Califa / Esrawe Studio

10:00 - 4 March, 2018
Restaurant El Califa / Esrawe Studio, © Camila Cossio
© Camila Cossio

© Camila Cossio © Camila Cossio © Camila Cossio © Camila Cossio + 21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico
  • Design Team

    Héctor Esrawe, Javier García-Rivera, María Santibáñez, Aloisio Guerrero, Alessandro Sperdutti, Daniela Pulido, Federico Stefanovich
  • Area

    240.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs