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Mexico City

Common Unity / Rozana Montiel | Estudio de Arquitectura

15:10 - 11 April, 2018
Common Unity / Rozana Montiel | Estudio de Arquitectura, © Sandra Pereznieto
© Sandra Pereznieto

© Sandra Pereznieto © Sandra Pereznieto © Sandra Pereznieto © Sandra Pereznieto + 24

Meroma Restaurant / Oficina de Práctica Arquitectónica

17:00 - 6 April, 2018
Meroma Restaurant / Oficina de Práctica Arquitectónica, © Luis Young
© Luis Young

© Luis Young © Luis Young © Luis Young © Luis Young + 19

  • Architects

  • Location

    Roma, 06760 Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico
  • Architects in Charge

    Rosalía Yuste, Diego Mañón
  • Design Team

    Berenice Solis y David Ignorosa
  • Area

    160.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings

06:00 - 6 April, 2018
What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings, Han Zhang along with her team at <a href="http://www.archdaily.cn">ArchDaily China</a>. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang
Han Zhang along with her team at ArchDaily China. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang

There's an old, weary tune that people sing to caution against being an architect: the long years of academic training, the studio work that takes away from sleep, and the small job market in which too many people are vying for the same positions. When you finally get going, the work is trying as well. Many spend months or even years working on the computer and doing models before seeing any of the designs become concrete. If you're talking about the grind, architects know this well enough from their training, and this time of ceaseless endeavor in the workplace only adds to that despair.

Which is why more and more architects are branching out. Better hours, more interesting opportunities, and a chance to do more than just build models. Furthermore, the skills you learn as an architect, such as being sensitive to space, and being able to grasp the cultural and societal demands of a place, can be put to use in rather interesting ways. Here, 3 editors at ArchDaily talk about being an architect, why they stopped designing buildings, and what they do in their work now. 

Zempoala 267 Building / GDE Grupo Diseño y Espacios

13:00 - 19 March, 2018
© Angelica Ibarra
© Angelica Ibarra

© Angelica Ibarra © Angelica Ibarra © Angelica Ibarra © Angelica Ibarra + 21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Barranca del Muerto 561, Merced Gómez, 01600 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
  • Architects in Charge

    Rene Alberto Sinta Muñóz, Sebastian Sinta Silva
  • Collaborators

    Ana Paulina Roldán, Daniel A. Díaz Torres, Daniel Morales, David Balbuena, Erick F. García Sinta, Mariel Sinta Ramos, Melissa Gallegos, Miguel A. Vega Ruíz.
  • Area

    1253.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

B72 / Dosa Studio

10:00 - 10 March, 2018
B72 / Dosa Studio, © Marcos Betanzos
© Marcos Betanzos

© Marcos Betanzos © Marcos Betanzos © Marcos Betanzos © Marcos Betanzos + 16

  • Architects

  • Location

    Anzures, 11590 Ciudad de México, CDMX, Mexico
  • Architect in Charge

    Raúl Medina, Sergio Sousa, Abraham Servin
  • Area

    500.0 m2
  • Photograph

    Marcos Betanzos

Restaurant El Califa / Esrawe Studio

10:00 - 4 March, 2018
Restaurant El Califa / Esrawe Studio, © Camila Cossio
© Camila Cossio

© Camila Cossio © Camila Cossio © Camila Cossio © Camila Cossio + 21

  • Architects

  • Location

    Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico
  • Design Team

    Héctor Esrawe, Javier García-Rivera, María Santibáñez, Aloisio Guerrero, Alessandro Sperdutti, Daniela Pulido, Federico Stefanovich
  • Area

    240.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photographs

House of Stone / Jorge Hernández de la Garza

13:00 - 3 March, 2018
House of Stone / Jorge Hernández de la Garza , © Jorge Hernández de la Garza
© Jorge Hernández de la Garza

© Jorge Hernández de la Garza © Jorge Hernández de la Garza © Jorge Hernández de la Garza © Jorge Hernández de la Garza + 28

C57-4 Building / Boué arquitectos

15:00 - 23 February, 2018
C57-4 Building / Boué arquitectos, © Marcos Betanzos
© Marcos Betanzos

© Marcos Betanzos © Marcos Betanzos © Marcos Betanzos © Marcos Betanzos + 14

Benjamín Romano: "I Focus on Improving the Building"

09:30 - 23 February, 2018
Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand
Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand

Visiting Mexico City several times in recent months enabled me to get to know a number of leading architects there. In the process, I was in turn directed to other architects that were new to me, whom I then discovered were, in fact, the leading and most revered architects in the country according to the local architectural community. I am particularly referring to Alberto Kalach and Mauricio Rocha, whose interviews were published in this column last year, and Benjamín Romano, whose name came up when I asked a number of architects to cite their favorite building from recent years in Mexico City. Along with the absolute favorite, Vasconcelos Library by Kalach, another structure stood out: Torre Reforma, a 57-story office tower, the tallest building in the city. The following conversation with Romano, its architect, took place inside this unusually powerful and inventive structure.

Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand Torre Reforma. Image © Alfonso Merchand + 33

Ramos House / JJRR/Arquitectura

17:00 - 19 February, 2018
Ramos House / JJRR/Arquitectura, © Fernando Marroquin
© Fernando Marroquin

© Fernando Marroquin © Fernando Marroquin © Fernando Marroquin © Fernando Marroquin + 17

Building Amsterdam 75 / HERNANDEZDELAGARZA

11:00 - 7 February, 2018
Building Amsterdam 75  / HERNANDEZDELAGARZA, Cortesía de Jorge Hernández de la Garza
Cortesía de Jorge Hernández de la Garza

Cortesía de Jorge Hernández de la Garza Cortesía de Jorge Hernández de la Garza Cortesía de Jorge Hernández de la Garza Cortesía de Jorge Hernández de la Garza + 43

  • Architects

  • Location

    Amsterdam 75, Hipódromo, 06100 Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico
  • Architect in Charge

    Jorge Hernández de la Garza
  • Area

    1200.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2018
  • Photography

    Courtesy of Jorge Hernández de la Garza

Romero 114 / HGR Arquitectos

13:00 - 5 February, 2018
Romero 114 / HGR Arquitectos, © DIANA ARNAU
© DIANA ARNAU

© DIANA ARNAU © DIANA ARNAU © DIANA ARNAU © DIANA ARNAU + 29

  • Architect

  • Location

    Niños Héroes, Ciudad de México, CDMX, México
  • Area

    15660.5 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Felix Candela's Concrete Shells: An Engineered Architecture for Mexico and Chicago

12:13 - 29 January, 2018
Felix Candela's Concrete Shells: An Engineered Architecture for Mexico and Chicago, Capilla de Palmira (Chapel of Palmira) Lomas de Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico, 1958 – 1959
Capilla de Palmira (Chapel of Palmira) Lomas de Cuernavaca, Morelos, Mexico, 1958 – 1959

This exhibition roots Félix Candela (1910-1997) as one of the most prolific architects of the 20th century in his advanced geometric designs and lasting influence in contemporary architecture. It originated through the research of scholar Juan Ignacio del Cueto and is curated by the architectural theorist and designer Alexander Eisenschmidt. The exhibition spotlights Félix Candela’s Concrete Shells through photographs, architectural models, and plans, as well as archival material from his time as a professor at the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois at Chicago from 1971 to 1978.

Candela exiled to Mexico

Tatiana Bilbao: “Architecture Should Benefit Every Single Human Being on This Planet”

09:30 - 12 January, 2018
Tatiana Bilbao: “Architecture Should Benefit Every Single Human Being on This Planet”, House in Ajijic, Jalostitlán, Mexico, 2010. Image © Iwan Baan
House in Ajijic, Jalostitlán, Mexico, 2010. Image © Iwan Baan

As part of a generation of designers that have, in recent years, put Mexico on the map, Tatiana Bilbao is an architect that is increasingly part of the profession’s global consciousness. But, while some Mexican architects have made their mark with spectacular architecture following the international trend of “iconic” architecture, Bilbao opted instead for a more people-focused approach. In this interview, the latest in Vladimir Belogolovsky’s “City of Ideas” series, Bilbao explains how she got into this type of community-building architecture, her thoughts on architectural form, and her ambitions for the future.

Vladimir Belogolovsky: The more I talk to architects of your generation or my generation, the more it becomes apparent that architecture has absolutely no boundaries. In other words, architecture is not just about buildings. More and more, architecture is about building communities.

Tatiana Bilbao: Absolutely. For me, that is the most important part of architecture. Architecture is not about building a building; architecture is about building a community.

Housing in Ciudad Acuña, Mexico, 2015. Image © Jaime Navarro Bioinnova, Culiacán Rosales, Mexico, 2012. Image © Iwan Baan House in Ajijic, Jalostitlán, Mexico, 2010. Image © Iwan Baan Casa Ventura, San Pedro Garza Garcia, Mexico, 2011. Image © Rory Gardiner + 20

Ignacia Hotel / Factor Eficiencia + A-G Interiorismo

11:00 - 2 January, 2018
Ignacia Hotel / Factor Eficiencia + A-G Interiorismo, © Jaime Navarro
© Jaime Navarro

© Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro © Jaime Navarro + 24

  • Architects

    A-G Interiorismo), Factor Eficiencia
  • Location

    Jalapa 208, Roma Nte., 06700, CDMX, Mexico
  • Architect in charge

    Fermín Espinosa (Factor Eficiencia) Andrés Gutiérrez (A-G Interiorismo)
  • Area

    420.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photography

    Jaime Navarro

Fundación Casa Wabi Headquarters / Alberto Kalach

11:00 - 20 December, 2017
Fundación Casa Wabi Headquarters / Alberto Kalach, © Yoshi Koitani
© Yoshi Koitani

© Yoshi Koitani © Yoshi Koitani © Yoshi Koitani © Yoshi Koitani + 11

  • Architects

  • Ubicación

    Dr. Atl, Sta María la Ribera, CDMX, Mexico
  • Area

    611.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Barrank Building / anonimous

13:00 - 28 November, 2017
Barrank Building / anonimous, © Yoshihiro Koitani
© Yoshihiro Koitani

© Marcos Betanzos © Yoshihiro Koitani © Yoshihiro Koitani © Yoshihiro Koitani + 24

  • Architects

  • Location

    Juan Tinoco 135, Merced Gómez, 01600 Ciudad de Mexico, CDMX, Mexico
  • Architects in charge

    Alfonso Jiménez, Barbara Trujillo, Mónica Ochoa, Pablo Eguiarte, Daniel Cerón
  • Construction

    anonimous
  • Area

    2137.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photography

    Yoshihiro Koitani, Marcos Betanzos

Extreme Cities: The Densest, Coldest, Remotest, Most Visited (etc) Human Settlements on Earth

09:30 - 14 November, 2017
Hong Kong <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/commpilot23/14557847230/in/photolist-obqLN3-bmhgya-f5PRvs-Ywi6Wt-Ddnv6-mwCc2-8yuA8Z-9ZD4xe-4DEWwn-USUqW-4T7iw4-bmheiZ-Ww639P-qQAyRc-5CoLwz-muzCk-qvpjcM-J1Zej-5JEzcq-aCXkva-qqKc8h-Du5DG5-acdVzo-6tZceg-66KGXt-2FEXcB-Ys6tQS-66Q1gW-EEr2ZR-EVCzQT-93zMWG-EtuFRe-4yCKbQ-VsKGNG-nvHcx-bmhaJ4-7UwsRh-eZuyr-9ZFU3w-7LmemC-4Q4W9Z-JMwVS3-bmh5dg-qeZ1p-91Z9Uc-2u9ZMu-93zNjw-9PXwCD-69YHQB-boTF69'> Khush N </a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'> CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
Hong Kong Khush N licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Humans are adaptable animals; we have evolved to adjust to, and survive in, many difficult and extreme conditions. In some cases, these extremes are natural, while in other modern cities extreme living situations are created by us, and we are forced to accept and adjust. Here is a list of extreme settlement conditions: some challenging, some wonderful and all of them offering a fascinating insight into how we occupy the planet in 2017.