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Andrew Galloway

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Spotlight: Aldo Rossi

04:30 - 3 May, 2019
Spotlight: Aldo Rossi, San Cataldo Cemetery. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
San Cataldo Cemetery. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Ada Louise Huxtable once described him as “a poet who happens to be an architect.” Italian architect Aldo Rossi (3 May 1931 – 4 September 1997) was known for his drawings, urban theory, and for winning the Pritzker Prize in 1990. Rossi also directed the Venice Biennale in 1985 and 1986—one of only two people to have served as director twice.

Mojiko Hotel. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3AMojiko_Hotel.jpg'>Wikimedia user Wiiii</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Quartier Schützenstrasse. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ABerlin%2C_Mitte%2C_Zimmerstrasse_68-69%2C_Quartier_Schuetzenstrasse.jpg'>Wikimedia user Jörg Zägel</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a> Bonnefantenmuseum. Image © James Taylor-Foster Gallaratese Quarter / Aldo Rossi & Carlo Aymonino. Image © Gili Merin + 8

AD Classics: Thorncrown Chapel / E. Fay Jones

22:00 - 7 November, 2018
AD Classics: Thorncrown Chapel / E. Fay Jones, © Randall Connaughton
© Randall Connaughton

This article was originally published on August 2, 2014. To read the stories behind other celebrated architecture projects, visit our AD Classics section.

Hidden in the middle of the forests surrounding Arkansas’ Ozark Mountains, Thorncrown Chapel rests amongst the oaks, pines and maples. The humble chapel, designed by Euine Fay Jones, is less than 35 years old – yet it’s on the U.S. Historic register, has been named one of the AIA’s top ten buildings of the 20th century, and has even been called the best American building since 1980.

© Randall Connaughton © Randall Connaughton © Randall Connaughton © Randall Connaughton + 20

25 Free Architecture Books You Can Read Online

01:00 - 18 August, 2014
25 Free Architecture Books You Can Read Online

If you don't have access to an architecture library (and even if you do), sifting through shelves can take hours. Buying books can be even more painful — for your wallet, at least. Instead, why not browse this list of 25 books that are all free and easily accessible online? Some are well-known classics of architecture literature, but we hope you find a few surprises as well.

The Architectural Applications of Zinc

00:00 - 6 August, 2014
The Architectural Applications of Zinc, The Roof Of Stonehenge - Custom Zinc Panels Fabricated By VMZINC. Image © Peter Cook
The Roof Of Stonehenge - Custom Zinc Panels Fabricated By VMZINC. Image © Peter Cook

Many times, the most innovative minds in architecture aren't the architects themselves. They can come in the form of students, researchers and in this case - providers. We recently asked VMZINC, a company that provides material solutions for architects, a few questions about the use of zinc in architecture, the Stonehenge Visitors Center and more.

The Solution To Pollution Is...The Rooftops?

00:00 - 1 August, 2014
The Solution To Pollution Is...The Rooftops?, Titanium Dioxide, used to keep Richard Meier's Jubilee Church a crisp white, is now being looked at for pollution reduction at The University of California - Riverside. Image © Flickr User Rory MacLeod
Titanium Dioxide, used to keep Richard Meier's Jubilee Church a crisp white, is now being looked at for pollution reduction at The University of California - Riverside. Image © Flickr User Rory MacLeod

The potential solution to smog and pollution may be hovering right over our heads, now that Students at the University of California - Riverside have designed a pollution reducing rooftop tile. According to their calculations, cladding one million rooftops with the tiles could remove 21 tons of nitrogen oxides -- daily. Currently the Los Angeles area spits out 500 tons of nitrogen oxides a day, so the tiles are just one piece of the puzzle in reducing pollution - however the students are imagining their nitrogen-oxide-eating Titanium Dioxide compound in exterior paints, concrete and more. To see all the possibilities, read the full article here.

Building Skin Developed That Could Cool Our Cities

00:00 - 21 July, 2014
© Harunori Noda
© Harunori Noda

The urban heat island effect - the hot, overwhelming temperatures that a city's concrete produces - has a huge impact on livability and comfort within the city. Now, an elegant cooling system has been designed that not only reduces energy usage, but - should it be installed on multiple buildings - could even lower the overall temperature of a city itself. Learn more, after the break.

This Temporary Treetop Hotel Lets You Sleep "With the Birds"

01:00 - 16 July, 2014

Chinese architecture firm Penda, known for their ecologically sensitive designs, has redesigned the tent in a bold new way for the AIM "Legend Of The Tent" Competition. Their proposal, ”One With The Birds," is a flexible and sustainable structure that integrates sleeping pods into the forest canopy. Inspired by Native American Tipis, which are moveable and reusable, the structure, made from bamboo sticks latched together with rope, leaves no impact on the site nor causes any harm to the bamboo itself.

A mock-up of the project will soon be installed as a temporary hotel. According to the architects, “after the temporary hotel is deconstructed, the materials can be reused as scaffolding on a construction site or reused as another temporary hotel on a different location.”

Learn more about this remarkable structure, after the break.

Courtesy of Penda Courtesy of Penda Courtesy of Penda Courtesy of Penda + 22

Campos Leckie Studio: Adapting Materials Across Contexts

00:00 - 2 July, 2014
Campos Leckie Studio: Adapting Materials Across Contexts, Vancouver, BC Based Architects Campos Lecki - The Zacatitos 03 House. Image © John Sinal
Vancouver, BC Based Architects Campos Lecki - The Zacatitos 03 House. Image © John Sinal

In the following interview, presented by ArchDaily Materials and originally published by Sixty7 Architecture Road, Canadian firm Campos Leckie Studio defines their process for designing site-specific, beautiful architecture that speaks for itself. Enjoy the firm's stunning projects and read the full interview after the break.

We asked Michael Leckie, one of the principals of Vancouver-based Campos Leckie Studio, about the importance of discovery in design and the textural differences between projects. Your website states that your firm is committed to a rigorous process of discovery. How do you explain that to clients?

Process is extremely important in our work. When we meet with clients we do not immediately provide napkin sketches or an indication of what form the work will ultimately take on. Rather, we focus on the formulation of the ‘design problem’ and the conditions that establish the basis for exploration and discovery. These contextual starting points include the site, program, materiality, budget, as well as cultural reference points. This is challenging for some clients, as our culture generally conditions people to expect to see the final product before they commit to something. 

Zacatitos 02. Image © John Sinal Zacatitos 03. Image © John Sinal Zacatitos 04. Image © John Sinal © John Sinal + 17

Trenches, Benches, and Trees on Towers: New Exhibit Delves Into our Relationship with WOOD

00:00 - 1 July, 2014

In our technology-obsessed age we tend to forget where materials actually come from. But in their first exhibition on materials, WOOD, the Het Nieuwe Instituut in Rotterdam not only overviews wood's uses from World War I trenches to daily tools, but also reminds us where wood comes from, tracking wood's manmade and natural "cycles" of destruction and reconstruction. WOOD is curated by Dan Handel, in cooperation with exhibition designers Jannetje in ‘t Veld and Toon Koehorst and is showing until October 8th of this year - learn more at the website here.

A Selection Of Everyday Wooden Materials Around The World. Image Courtesy of Ernst Van Der Hoeven Famous Colour Photographer Hans Hilderbrand's Photo Of The Wooden Trenches During WWI. Image Courtesy of Hans Hildenbrand The Exhibition Is Not Just About Wood, But The Forest As Well. Image Courtesy of Dan Handel James Wines' Vision For A Best Products Showroom. Image Courtesy of James Wines + 9

Happy Birthday Robert Venturi

00:00 - 25 June, 2014
Happy Birthday Robert Venturi, © Denise Scott Brown
© Denise Scott Brown

Robert Venturi, the architect famous for "less is a bore," turns 89 today. Venturi started his firm in 1964 and ran it with his wife and partner Denise Scott Brown from 1967 until 2012. Today the Pritzker Prize winner's legacy lives on as the firm continues under the name VSBA (Venturi Scott Brown Associates).

Why Tall Wooden Buildings are On the Rise: An Interview with Perkins+Will's Wood Expert

00:00 - 25 June, 2014
Why Tall Wooden Buildings are On the Rise: An Interview with Perkins+Will's Wood Expert, IZM Building / Architekten Hermann Kaufmann - Germany. Image © Norman A. Müller
IZM Building / Architekten Hermann Kaufmann - Germany. Image © Norman A. Müller

Material Minds, presented by ArchDaily Materials, is our new series of short interviews with architects, designers, scientists, and others who use architectural materials in innovative ways. Enjoy!

Wood. The United States is the largest producer of the natural resource in the world. But yet we rarely see it in commercial, high-rise construction. So we asked a wood expert -- Rebecca Holt at Perkins+Will, an analyst for reThink Wood's recent Tall Wood Survey -- to tell us about its potential benefits.

AD: Why is wood a material architects should use in taller buildings?

There are lots of reasons to consider wood – first it has a lower environmental impact than other traditional choices like concrete and steel. Wood is the only major building material that is made the by sun and is completely renewable.

Soft Shells - Porous and Deployable Architecture

00:00 - 21 June, 2014
Soft Shells - Porous and Deployable Architecture , Courtesy of Sophia Vyzoviti and BIS Publishers
Courtesy of Sophia Vyzoviti and BIS Publishers

Cut, Pleat, Tile, Weave. Four principles guide every project in the publication Soft Shells - a new publication that features porous, deployable, expandable and retractable architecture. Keep reading after the break to see two of the featured projects, but make sure to check out the full book here.

Arthur Andersson on Timeless Materials & Building "Ruins"

01:00 - 18 June, 2014
Tower House . Image © Art Gray
Tower House . Image © Art Gray

Material Minds, presented by ArchDaily Materials, is our new series of short interviews with architects, designers, scientists, and others who use architectural in innovative ways. Enjoy!

Arthur Andersson of Andersson-Wise Architects wants to build ruins. He wants things to be timeless - to look good now and 2000 years from now. He wants buildings to fit within a place and time. To do that he has a various set of philosophies, processes and some great influences. Read our full in-depth interview with Mr. Andersson, another revolutionary "Material Mind," after the break.

Tower House . Image © Art Gray Tower House . Image © Art Gray Tower House . Image © Art Gray Stone Creek Camp. Image © Art Gray + 15

Ten Buildings Pushing The Boundaries of Wood

01:00 - 17 June, 2014
Perkins + Will UBC Earth Sciences Building. Image © Martin Tessler
Perkins + Will UBC Earth Sciences Building. Image © Martin Tessler

Wood is the ultimate material - it's renewable, sequesters carbon and more importantly, it's buildable. Nevertheless wood is rarely used in tall, vertical construction. Now reThink wood has come out with their Tall Wood Survey (available in full on their website), which surveyed over 50 wood experts to explore three main areas in which wood is usually questioned: financing, insurance and performance. But beyond discussing the pros and cons of wood, the survey also highlights 10 projects that show how wood products are being used in ways you never thought existed. See all ten innovative projects, after the break.

Reflective Concrete, Wooden Textiles And More: Five Materials You Never Knew Existed

00:00 - 14 June, 2014
Reflective Concrete, Wooden Textiles And More: Five Materials You Never Knew Existed, Wooden Textiles - A Mixture Of Of Materials That Makes Wood Feel Soft. Image Courtesy of Interiors & Sources
Wooden Textiles - A Mixture Of Of Materials That Makes Wood Feel Soft. Image Courtesy of Interiors & Sources

The following post is presented by ArchDaily Materials, our new US product catalog.

Recently, Interiors & Sources featured fourteen of the coolest materials they've come across in their 30-year history; the following post lists the five that most tickled our fancy. Enjoy!

2,800 iPod Nano Screens Make Up Cornell's Discovery Wall

00:00 - 14 June, 2014

Consisting of over 2,800 iPod Nano screens, "The Discovery Wall" at Cornell's Medical College in Manhattan was a 2.5 year long process in digital art, conceived by Squint/Opera and accomplished in collaboration with Hirsch & Mann. From a distance, the animated screen appears as a single, unified image. But take a closer look and every single screen has its own unique text. As a permanent piece, it shows the plausibility of digital art to integrate with the existing building fabric. Watch the video above and make sure to learn more about the creative process here.

VIDEO: The Models of Richard Meier

00:00 - 11 June, 2014

Richard Meier’s Models on Nowness.com

Through the passage of time and technology, models remain integral in Richard Meier's office. No only are they tactile, visceral objects that represent space in way a computer simply cannot, but they also serve as "remembrances" for Meier (after all, the clients get to keep the buildings themselves). In the video above, NOWNESS gives us a sneak peek into Richard Meier's Model Museum at Mana Contemporary in New Jersey, where many of Meier's 300+ models now call home. Enjoy!

Three Projects That Transform Low-Tech Materials Into Innovative Design

01:00 - 11 June, 2014
Three Projects That Transform Low-Tech Materials Into Innovative Design, Top: Educational Building In Mozambique / Bergen School of Architecture Students. Middle: School Library Gando  / Kere Architecture. Bottom: Umubano Primary School / MASS Design Group
Top: Educational Building In Mozambique / Bergen School of Architecture Students. Middle: School Library Gando / Kere Architecture. Bottom: Umubano Primary School / MASS Design Group

The following article is presented by Materials, ArchDaily's new US product catalog.

How many times in the last year have you heard 3d printing mentioned? What about double-skinned curtain walls or “smart” buildings? High-tech materials almost always seem to dominate the conversation - at least in architectural circles. But using the latest invention in material technology usually does not make a building “innovative.” More often than not, it just makes it expensive and flashy.

Low-tech materials like lumber, stone and brick, on the other hand, are often overlooked, even though the use of local and locally produced materials offers the lowest possible carbon footprint. And while these common materials may seem boring, with a bit of imagination and technical skill, an architect can transform these materials into something fresh. With that in mind, check out three truly innovative projects which use low-tech materials in different and exciting ways.