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Solar Squared: A Glass Block That Generates Electricity

06:00 - 25 September, 2017
Solar Squared: A Glass Block That Generates Electricity, © Build Solar
© Build Solar

Renewable energy experts from the University of Exeter in England have developed a glass block with built-in solar cells. The idea is that with the spread of technology, it is possible to build a house or a whole building's facade using blocks that generate energy.

The product has been named Solar Squared, tests done at the university have shown that they guarantee thermal insulation and allow natural light to enter the building.

Meet the Mobile Dwelling Space Named B.O.B.

08:00 - 24 September, 2017
Meet the Mobile Dwelling Space Named B.O.B., © Adam Shilling
© Adam Shilling

Three M. Arch. candidates at Montana State University, Jonathan Chavez, Kimball Kaiser and Adam Shilling, won an Undergraduate Scholars Program research grant which they used to fund their design-build project: B.O.B., the Backyard Office Box. B.O.B. is a kit of parts which, when put together, create a 150-square-foot dwelling space. The design team, also known as Tr3s, wanted their project to be adaptable to a variety of sites and users. B.O.B. can function as an additional space to already existing projects or standalone as a temporary shelter. 

© Adam Shilling © Adam Shilling © Kimball Kaiser Meet the Mobile Dwelling Space Named B.O.B. + 19

The 15 Most Popular Architectural Materials & Products of 2017

09:30 - 22 September, 2017

What are the best construction materials and products on the market? Which are the most popular? Thanks to the activities of our readers, we're beginning to find some answers to these questions. Combining the use of two ArchDaily tools, many of our readers have saved their favorite architectural materials and products—directly from our catalog—into their personalized My ArchDaily folders.

We have investigated the data from the first 6 months of 2017 to identify and share the most popular products from our catalog with you. What do these products have that make them so popular? Would you apply them on your next project?

Stunning Images of Stone Architecture: The Best Photos of the Week

12:00 - 17 September, 2017

Stone construction is a simple technique that has been used since the earliest human civilizations. These days, stone is regaining popularity in contemporary architecture thanks to the diversity of results that can be achieved by the union of stone pieces. Whether it's the size, the type of cut, or the color of the material, the truth is that the use of stone can add incredible textures to architectural designs. Read on for a selection of 13 photos that allow us to marvel at stone's beauty and expressiveness, created by renowned photographers such as Erieta AttaliKyungsub Shin and Dimitris Kleanthis.

© Kyungsub Shin © Robert Leš © Simon Devitt © Kyungsub Shin + 14

Breathtaking Italian Views Framed in Wood

08:00 - 16 September, 2017
Breathtaking Italian Views Framed in Wood, © Lorenzo Massimiano
© Lorenzo Massimiano

With the common goal across their portfolio of enhancing the landscape, Camposaz has designed a tourist information pavilion in Roccamonfina, Italy. The wood pavilion is sited just off of a pedestrian path, overlooking the adjacent public park with stunning views of the nearby mountains, a driver in the design.

Construction Diagrams Construction Diagrams Construction Diagrams Construction Diagrams + 32

Small-Scale Rainwater Harvesting Made Simpler by Studio Bas Van der Veer

06:00 - 15 September, 2017
Small-Scale Rainwater Harvesting Made Simpler by Studio Bas Van der Veer, Courtesy of Studio Bas van der Veer
Courtesy of Studio Bas van der Veer

Earlier this month, Studio Bas van der Veer, the Dutch product design studio, unveiled its design for a rain barrel at the three-day fair, spoga+gafa 2017, in Cologne. Van der Veer, a graduate of the Design Academy Eindhoven, initially designed the product – then titled ‘A Drop of Water’ – as part of his thesis in 2009, for which he not only won the prestigious René Smeets Award for best project at the school’s Graduate Galleries exhibition but was also shortlisted for the Melkweg Award. Over the years, the design won numerous accolades, including the Journées des Collections Jardin - Innovation Award, and the Tuinidee Award.

Courtesy of Studio Bas van der Veer Courtesy of Studio Bas van der Veer Courtesy of Studio Bas van der Veer Courtesy of Studio Bas van der Veer + 12

A Modular Wooden Bench Forms the Backbone of this Awesome Undulating Walkway

14:00 - 10 September, 2017
A Modular Wooden Bench Forms the Backbone of this Awesome Undulating Walkway, © Zeenah Mohammed Ali
© Zeenah Mohammed Ali

This modular design developed by the students of the Department of Architecture Sciences at Ryerson University proposes a public space to sit and relax that works as an extension of the walkway, appropriating and giving a new meaning to the parking spaces in the streets of Toronto. 

The project, with a natural wave form, is built by a series of Accoya wood modules, which allow easy storage, reuse, and reconfiguration. 

© Zeenah Mohammed Ali © Zeenah Mohammed Ali © Zeenah Mohammed Ali © Zeenah Mohammed Ali + 35

This Innovative Cooling Installation Fights Soaring Temperatures in New Delhi

14:00 - 9 September, 2017
This Innovative Cooling Installation Fights Soaring Temperatures in New Delhi, © S. Anirudh
© S. Anirudh

This installation is a bespoke attempt to simplify and reinterpret the concept of air-conditioning, understanding that standardized solutions may not be universally applicable given the constraints of cost and surrounding environment. Using computational technologies, the team at Ant Studio has reinterpreted traditional evaporative cooling techniques to build a prototype of cylindrical clay cones, each with a custom design and size.

© S. Anirudh © S. Anirudh © S. Anirudh © S. Anirudh + 17

Striking Images of Exposed Steel: The Best Photos of the Week

12:00 - 3 September, 2017
Striking Images of Exposed Steel: The Best Photos of the Week, © Imagen Subliminal
© Imagen Subliminal

High strength, ease of transport, and simplicity of assembly are among the many major advantages of steel. But while utilitarian steel structures tend to be hidden by architects, working with exposed steel can lead to attractive results. Steel not only brings lightness to a design, but can also offer different expressions of color and texture, depending on the treatment of the material. Below we present a selection of 14 photos of steel architecture from well-known photographers such as Adrien WilliamsImagen Subliminal, and Sergio Pirrone.

© Pete Eckert © Sergio Pirrone © Agustín Garza © Paul Crosby + 16

How an Artist Constructed a Wooden Replica of Mies' Farnsworth House

09:30 - 31 August, 2017
How an Artist Constructed a Wooden Replica of Mies' Farnsworth House, © Pedro Marinello
© Pedro Marinello

In December 2010, Manuel Peralta Lorca completed the work "Welcome Less Is More," a wooden reconstruction of Mies van der Rohe's Farnsworth House that was installed inside the Patricia Ready Gallery in Santiago, Chile. This September, a new version of this work will be mounted in the hall of Santiago's Museum of Contemporary Art, under the name "Home Less is More."

In the following story, the artist tells us about the process of reinterpreting this icon of modern architecture in wood and how a team of carpenters—who agreed to immerse themselves in the philosophy of Mies—was fundamental to completing the challenge.

This Adjustable Tensegrity Structure is Constructed From Just Two Structural Elements

08:00 - 31 August, 2017

This investigation by Kuan-Ting Lai, developed as part of his thesis on Reconfigurable Systems of Tensegrity at the University of Stuttgart, is an exploration of the capabilities of structural principles in creating transformable architectural structures.

The project, a prototype made of pneumatic cylinders and polycarbonate panels, explores different methods of reconfiguration based on the basic rules of tensegrity, demonstrating the potential to rapidly adjust the lighting or ventilation conditions offered by the structure.

Design for a Modular House Proposes a Synergy Between Prefabrication and Carpentry

04:00 - 31 August, 2017
Cortesía de abarca+palma
Cortesía de abarca+palma

Seeking to connect the traditions of carpentry and the prefabrication industry, Chilean practice abarca+palma have developed a modular house proposal made up of 10 different types of module, capable of forming 5 different house layouts.

The house is constructed in pine wood—using composite beams and pillars—with prefabricated SIP panels.

This Pavillion Lives and Dies Through Its Sustainable Agenda

08:00 - 30 August, 2017
This Pavillion Lives and Dies Through Its Sustainable Agenda, © Krishna & Govind Raja
© Krishna & Govind Raja

Are the concrete buildings we build actually a sign of architectural progress? Defunct housing projects abandoned shopping malls, and short-sighted urban projects are more often than not doomed to a lifetime of emptiness after they have served their purpose. Their concrete remains and transforms into a lingering reminder of what was once a symbol of modern ambition. Stadiums and their legacies, in particular, come under high scrutiny of how their giant structures get used after the games are over, with few Olympic stadiums making successful transitions into everyday life. With a new approach to sustainability, the Shell Mycelium pavilion is part of a manifesto towards a more critical take on building. Say the designers on their position: “We criticize these unconscious political choices, with living buildings, that arise from nature and return to nature, as though they never existed.”

The Shell Mycelium Pavillion is a collaboration between BEETLES 3.3 and Yassin Areddia Designs and offers an alternative to conscious design through temporary structures. Located at the MAP Project space at the Dutch Warehouse, the pavillion formed part of the Kochi Muziris Biennale 2016 Collateral in India.

More Than 2,000 Unique Robotically Manufactured Bricks Generate Variable Walls in This Pavilion

04:00 - 30 August, 2017
More Than 2,000 Unique Robotically Manufactured Bricks Generate Variable Walls in This Pavilion, © Christian J. Lange
© Christian J. Lange

Developed by researchers and students from the Faculty of Architecture at HKU and supported by Sino Group, the 'Ceramic Constellation Pavilion' is built on a wooden structure that supports a series of "walls" formed by about 2,000 clay bricks. Each of these individual components is unique and has been manufactured using robotic technology and 3D printing, allowing to generate different types of transparency and opacity in their different faces. 

© Christian J. Lange © Christian J. Lange © Christian J. Lange © Christian J. Lange + 32

This Stone Vault Prototype Creates Almost No Material Waste

09:30 - 26 August, 2017
This Stone Vault Prototype Creates Almost No Material Waste, © Maurizio Barberio
© Maurizio Barberio

Italy-based New Fundamentals Research Group recently designed and built a full-scale prototype of an experimental barrel-vaulted stone structure for SNBR, a French company that specializes in cutting-edge stone construction. The structure is named Hypar Vault in a reference to the geometry of its constituent blocks; it uses two types of prefabricated stone modules—one type is the mirror image of the other—whose designs are based on the hypar (hyperbolic paraboloid), one of the only "doubly-ruled" surfaces in geometry. The use of these configurations allowed the vault to be constructed with almost zero wasted stone.

© Maurizio Barberio © Giuseppe Scaltrito © Maurizio Barberio © Maurizio Barberio + 29

This Large Structural Frame is Made From Laminated Wood

08:00 - 26 August, 2017
This Large Structural Frame is Made From Laminated Wood, © Paul McCredie
© Paul McCredie

Warren and Mahoney Architects' design for the extension of Wellington Airport in New Zealand highlights the potential of using laminated wood in large-scale architectural projects.

The structure of the facade is the result of recognizing the great versatility of laminated wood when designing large structures and complex shapes, allowing, in this case, to propose the construction of a straight piece that is curved to join the next piece.

© Paul McCredie © Paul McCredie © Paul McCredie © Paul McCredie + 32

How to Install Inconspicuous Thermal Solar Panels in Just a Few Hours

06:00 - 22 August, 2017

When it comes to increasing the energy efficiency of a project, solar panels provide many benefits, but architects often avoid using them for aesthetic reasons.

Today there are alternative solutions for adding solar receptors to the individual elements that make up the roof—the zone of greatest exposure to sunlight—that are less conspicuous and very effective in terms of energy production. One such example is solar thermal panels, which use the power of the sun to heat the building, produce hot water or generate heat for pools.

These new panels are made from natural slate stone, in formats ranging from 32x22 cm to 50x25 cm. The material elements not only ensure thermal inertia and impermeability, but are also able to heat up to 50 liters of water per day per square meter of surface -- all while avoiding the average emission of 90 kg of CO2.

5 Passive Cooling Alternatives Using Robotics and Smart Materials

14:00 - 20 August, 2017
5 Passive Cooling Alternatives Using Robotics and Smart Materials, Cortesía de IAAC
Cortesía de IAAC

The IAAC (Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia) has developed a series of advanced materials and systems for air conditioning and passive ventilation, allowing homes to reduce interior temperatures up to 5 degrees lower while saving the electricity consumption caused by the traditional air-conditioning. The systems are made from long-lifespan materials, which lower the costs of maintenance in the long-term and can be used as low-cost alternative building technologies. 

The projects highlighted are the Breathing Skin, Hydroceramics, Hydromembrane, Morphluid and Soft Robotics - all developed by students of the IAAC's Digital Matter Intelligent Constructions (conducted by Areti Markopoulou). The passive air-conditioning of spaces is investigated using a combination of new materials that mimic organic processes, adaptive structures and Robotics that help regulate temperature and create sustainable micro climates.