Cornelia Hahn Oberlander Wins 2015 Margolese National Design for Living Prize

14:00 - 4 November, 2015
Cornelia Hahn Oberlander Wins 2015 Margolese National Design for Living Prize, UBC Museum of Anthropology. Image © Flickr CC User Kyle Pearce
UBC Museum of Anthropology. Image © Flickr CC User Kyle Pearce

Landscape architect Cornelia Hahn Oberlander has won the 2015 Margolese National Design for Living Prize for her impact on Canadian cities. The School of Architecture and Landscape Architecture at the University of British Columbia, who awards the annual $50,000 prize, chose Oberlander for her "breathtaking, poetic, unforgettable, charged with meaning, and above all, Modernist" designs that have made "outstanding contributions to the development or improvement of living environments for Canadians of all economic classes."

Winners Announced for Architecture for Humanity Vancouver’s “NEXT BIG ONE” Competition

00:00 - 8 November, 2014
Winners Announced for Architecture for Humanity Vancouver’s “NEXT BIG ONE” Competition, "Modular Landscapes" was designed in response to the 2011 Japanese earthquake. Image Courtesy of Architecture for Humanity Vancouver Chapter
"Modular Landscapes" was designed in response to the 2011 Japanese earthquake. Image Courtesy of Architecture for Humanity Vancouver Chapter

Architecture for Humanity Vancouver Chapter has unveiled the winners of "NEXT BIG ONE," an open call for design solutions to high-magnitude earthquake and tsunami events that plague cities around the world. Project teams were challenged to propose a solution that "can mitigate natural disasters while simultaneously providing community permanence."  

A jury comprised of leading architects and professionals from Architecture Research Office (Stephen Cassell), Perkins + Will (Susan Gushe), Bing Thom Architects (Eileen Keenan), Scott & Scott Architects (David Scott), and the City of Vancouver (Doug Smith) evaluated the projects. Entries were evaluated based on three key criteria: the exemplification of innovation in disaster design, promotion of community resiliency before and after disasters, and compliance with multi-hazard parameters for worst-case disaster scenarios.

Entry No. 626137 - Safety Arena. Image Courtesy of Architecture for Humanity Vancouver Chapter Entry No. 626514 - Revive the Moat. Image Courtesy of Architecture for Humanity Vancouver Chapter Entry No. 626139 - Modular Landscapes. Image Courtesy of Architecture for Humanity Vancouver Chapter Entry No. 626536 - Aqua Estate. Image Courtesy of Architecture for Humanity Vancouver Chapter +16

DjavadMowafaghian Centre for Brain Health / Stantec

13:00 - 21 May, 2012
Courtesy of Stantec
Courtesy of Stantec

Stantec’s design for the DjavafMowafaghian Centre for Brain Health at UBC, in Vancouver, British Columbia in Canada is envisioned as a translational research facility defined by present and future medical practices that collaborate under research and patient care.  To achieve this, designers considered the intersections within the spatial dynamics of the facility to coordinate interactions between researchers and clinicians. The facility is 134,500 square feet and includes exam / consultation rooms, lab benches, a full conference centre, a brain tissue and DNA bank of samples collected from consenting patients, and patient and animal MRI capabilities.

More after the break.

Courtesy of Stantec Courtesy of Stantec Courtesy of Stantec Courtesy of Stantec +22

Video: UBC Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability

12:30 - 4 December, 2010

The Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS) at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver is on track to open in the summer of 2011. CIRS aims to be the most innovative and high performance building in North America, a “living laboratory” where professors, students and partners demonstrate leading-edge research and develop sustainable design practices, products, systems and policies. The building will push the frontiers of sustainable construction materials and building techniques. It will draw much of its heat from the ground, electricity from the sun, ventilation from the wind, water from the rain–all while reducing the university’s energy use and carbon footprint.