ATRIUM – Groupe Dynamite / Ædifica

© François Descôteaux

Architects: Ædifica
Location: Montreal, QC,
Area: 9800.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: François Descôteaux

Prince Philip Residence / Thellend Fortin Architectes

© Charles Lanteigne photo

Architects: Thellend Fortin Architectes
Location: , QC,
Year: 2014
Photographs: Charles Lanteigne photo

The Bibliothèque du Boisé / Consortium Labonté Marcil, Cardinal Hardy, Eric Pelletier architectes

© Yien Chao

Architects: Consortium Labonté Marcil, Cardinal Hardy, Eric Pelletier architectes
Location: , QC, Canada
Presented by:
Area: 5000.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Yien Chao

SSENSE / Humà Design

© Adrien Williams

Architects: Humà Design
Location: , QC,
Year: 2014
Photographs: Adrien Williams

Competition Entry: Saucier + Perrotte Designs Glass Pavilion for Montreal Botanical Garden

© / Luxigon / Michel Desvigne Paysagiste

Conceived as a natural extension of the existing pathways at ’s Botanical Garden, Saucier + Perrotte architectes’ proposal for the “Espace Pour la Vie Glass Pavilion” competition was envisioned as an immersive glass shelter “eroded” within a lush landscape. The architects, who were also responsible for designing the garden’s 2001 First Nation Garden Pavilion, were among the competition finalists. You can learn more about their proposal, after the break. 

Le 205 / Atelier Moderno

© Stéphane Groleau

Architects: Atelier Moderno
Location: Montreal, QC,
Year: 2014
Photographs: Stéphane Groleau

“Insectarium Metamorphosis” Takes First Place in Montréal’s Space for Life Competition

© + Pelletier de Fontenay

Kuehn MalvezziPelletier De FontenayJodoin Lamarre PratteDupras Ledoux, and Nicholet Chartrand Knoll () have won one of three first place positions in Montréal’s Space for Life International Architectural Competition, which seeks to reinvent mankind’s relationship with the natural world for the city’s 375th birthday, with their proposal for the redesign of the Montréal Insectarium. Titled Insectarium Metamorphosis, the project provides new spaces for visitors to get up close and personal with the multitude of insects housed in the museum.

Lacaton & Vassal’s Glass Pavilion Earns Top Spot in Montréal’s Space for Life Competition

© Lacaton & Vassal, , FABG

The Space for Life International Architectural Competition of Montréal has recently announced its three winners. The competition prompted designers to rekindle an interest in the natural world through an architectural intervention at a pre-appointed venue. Located in the city’s Botanical Gardens, this winning proposal by Lacaton & VassalFrédéric DruotFABG, and SNC Lavalin does so in a simple, elegant way, with a glass pavilion for the Gardens that serves a variety of purposes. Learn more, after the break.

AZPML and KANVA Reimagine Montréal’s Biodome in Winning Competition Design

Wall . Image Courtesy of AZMPL

Montréal’s Space for Life competition has recently announced its winners, with design firms AZPML and KANVA named as one of three first winners with their joint design. The competition demanded that entrants reinvigorate the relationship between humanity and the natural world through an intervention at Montréal’s Biodome. The two firms’ winning proposal, Migration du Biodome, does that with the installation of a series of undulating walls.

AD Classics: Montreal Biosphere / Buckminster Fuller

© Flickr user abdallahh

Architects have never enjoyed a position of such supreme prominence as they did in the worldview of Buckminster “Bucky” Fuller. To him, architects alone were capable of understanding and navigating the complex interrelationships of society, technology, and environment as viewed through the comprehensive paradigm of systems theory. Architecture, in this model, was intended to exist in close contact with both mankind and nature, playing civilization’s most critical role in elevating the state of humanity and promoting its responsible stewardship of the environment. Emerging from the ethical positivity of postwar modernism, this melioristic perspective marks perhaps the zenith of optimism’s ascent in mid-twentieth century thought, and gave Fuller a uniquely moral blueprint for his revolutionary designs.

AD Round Up: Canadian Architecture to Be Thankful For

The Crystal, extension to the Royal Ontario Museum by Studio Daniel Libeskind. Image © Andrew Rowat

Today marks Canadian Thanksgiving, and to celebrate the occasion we’ve rounded up some of ’s best architecture. Our five selections represent five Canadian cities, each with a unique architectural sensibility. We begin in Toronto with the Royal Ontario Museum addition by Studio Daniel Libeskind, a striking intervention using prisms of glass and steel fused to a 102-year-old museum structure; next we go to Montréal for Habitat 67 by Moshe Safdie, an interlocking modular housing project designed for the World Exposition of 1967; to Calgary for Santiago Calatrava‘s understated Peace Bridge, a stunning glass-encased red lightning bolt spanning the city’s widest waterway; then to Winnipeg‘s Old Market Square Stage by emerging firm 5468796 Architecture, a chameleonic performance space wrapped by a mesh curtain of steel cubes; and finally to the outskirts of Vancouver for the Richmond Olympic Oval, a masterpiece of engineering and the centre of attention during the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics. Enjoy, eh.

LaSalle Waterworks Building / Affleck de la Riva architects

© Marc Cramer

Architects: Affleck de la Riva architects
Location: Avenue de l’Esplanade, , QC,
Project Manager : Gavin Affleck
Design Architect : Gavin Affleck
Project Team : Steven Leather, Brigitte Boudreau, Alexandre Cassiani, Federico Carbajal, Serge Gascon and Melanie Morris
Area: 450.0 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Marc Cramer, Alexandre Chabot, Affleck de la Riva

See The Most Over Budget Projects of All Time Ranked in this Infographic

Courtesy of Podio

One thousand nine hundred and ninety: the percentage by which the $3 billion Montreal Olympic Stadium - a project designated only $148 million in 1973 – exceeded its original budgetTen: the number of years that the Sydney Opera House was over its deadline. Twenty-four: the number of projects included in Monumental Budget Busters, an interactive ranking an array of works - ranging from the International Space Station to the Sochi Olympics - from smallest to largest in cost and time overruns. The list includes infrastructure, architecture, and governmental projects with budget overruns ranging from $210 million to $68 billion. These costs beg the question – does the end justify the means? Find out with the interactive infographic after the break.

Kinoya Restaurant / Jean de Lessard

© Adrien Williams

Interior Designers: Jean de Lessard
Location: , QC,
Area: 1500.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Adrien Williams

Collège Saint-Louis / Marosi Troy Architectes + Jodoin Lamarre Pratte architectes

© Stephane Groleau

Architects: Marosi Troy Architectes, Jodoin Lamarre Pratte architectes
Location: Collège Saint-Louis, 50 34 Ave, Lachine, QC H8T,
Design Lead: Martin Troy, Ali Torabi
Area: 13300.0 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Stephane Groleau

Au Pain Doré / NatureHumaine

© Adrien Williams

Architects: NatureHumaine
Location: Côte-des-Neiges Road, Montreal, QC,
Area: 1500.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Adrien Williams

Folklore Meets Design, Architecture and Light Deep in the Canadian Forest

Imagine yourself standing at a glowing threshold between reality and make believe, watching as mythical creatures dash across trees and into other dimensions. Imagine a world where the glimmer of fairies is reflected on a forest floor illuminated by trees of all colours; a world where a sea of stars transforms into an imaginary wolf, standing sentinel over its fairy tale universe. This enchanted world exists, thanks to the creatives at Moment Factory. In their Foresta Lumina video mapping project, they create a narrative installation set in the mysterious backwoods of Quebec, Canada. Find out how they add a little fantasy to ordinary reality after the break.

Exhibition: The Mound of Vendôme

Courtesy of

On view at the CCA from 19 June to 14 September 2014 and curated by architectural historian David Gissen, The Mound of Vendôme revisits one key episode of French history when the Commune de Paris in 1871 voted to demolish the Vendôme Column, abolishing all allusions to the Napoleonic era. To protect the surrounding architecture during demolition, a radical landscape was erected on Place Vendôme. Informed by the methods of experimental history, Gissen’s ongoing research project and installation at the CCA traces the provocative history of the column and mound, while arguing for its historicisation and reconstruction.