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John Lautner's Goldstein House Gifted to LACMA by its Owner

14:00 - 18 February, 2016
John Lautner's Goldstein House Gifted to LACMA by its Owner, © Jeff Green
© Jeff Green

The Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) has announced that John Lautner's famous LA residence, the James Goldstein House - often referred to as the Sheats Goldstein Residence - has been promised to the museum by its current owner James Goldstein. The gift includes the house itself, a James Turrell skyspace which is located on the property, and architectural models of the home (as well as a number of artworks and Goldstein's 1961 Rolls Royce for good measure). The house will be the museum's first architectural acquisition, following similar acquisitions of Modernist homes by other museums such as Crystal Bridges Museum's recently-opened Bachmann-Wilson House by Frank Lloyd Wright.

© Tom Ferguson Photography © Tom Ferguson Photography © Jeff Green © Tom Ferguson Photography +5

SAH Los Angeles Seminar: Surveying LA -- Past, Present, Future

11:30 - 8 February, 2016
SAH Los Angeles Seminar: Surveying LA -- Past, Present, Future

The SAH Los Angeles Seminar bridges the Society's efforts in historic conservation to the contemporary built environment and the local public and professional community. The LA Seminar will critically look at SurveyLA, a five-million dollar, city-wide study of historic resources sponsored by the J. Paul Getty Trust and the City of Los Angeles. As described online, “SurveyLA – the Los Angeles Historic Resources Survey – is Los Angeles' first-ever comprehensive program to identify significant historic resources throughout our city. The survey marks a coming-of-age for Los Angeles' historic preservation movement, and will serve as a centerpiece for the City's first truly comprehensive preservation program."

Backyard BI(h)OME / Kevin Daly Architects

13:00 - 5 February, 2016
Backyard BI(h)OME / Kevin Daly Architects, © Nico Marques / Photekt
© Nico Marques / Photekt

© Nico Marques / Photekt © Nico Marques / Photekt © Nico Marques / Photekt © Nico Marques / Photekt +16

Exhibition: Finding Form

11:00 - 4 February, 2016
Exhibition: Finding Form

Finding Form is a co-show art event showcasing the works of Jeff Morrical, Jeff Guiducci & Carmelia Chiang, all working as architects in Los Angeles.

Morrical's work, The Folded Ocean, incorporates single sheet sculptures shaped by folds and gravity. Guiducci & Chiang's work, Tangential Mode, demonstrates the many possibilities of extraordinary form through the use of a most ordinary material - PVC piping.

The opening reception took place on Jan 23, 2016 and will be open to the public through Feb 13, 2016 at Design Matters Gallery in West Los Angeles. (11527 W. Pico Blvd).

Sunset Plaza Drive / GWdesign

15:00 - 20 January, 2016
Sunset Plaza Drive / GWdesign, © Dana Meilijson
© Dana Meilijson

© Dana Meilijson © Dana Meilijson © Dana Meilijson © Dana Meilijson +25

  • Architects

  • Location

    Sunset Plaza Dr, Los Angeles, CA 90069, USA
  • Architect in Charge

    Dominic Gasparoly
  • Associate

    Khalid Watson
  • Area

    5600.0 ft2
  • Photographs

Call for Applications: 2016 L.A. Conservancy Preservation Awards

16:30 - 10 January, 2016
Call for Applications: 2016 L.A. Conservancy Preservation Awards

The Los Angeles Conservancy is now accepting applications for their 2016 Preservation Awards, which recognize outstanding achievement in the field of historic preservation in Los Angeles County. Applications are due by 5 p.m. on Friday, January 29, 2016.

An independent jury of experts in architecture, historic preservation, and community development will select the award recipients. Submissions that illustrate the value and power of preservation are encouraged from across Los Angeles County.

Projects honored in the past have varied widely, from sensitive restoration, rehabilitation, and adaptive reuse projects, to groundbreaking advocacy and education efforts undertaken by individuals or groups.

Shulman Home and Studio / Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects

13:00 - 10 January, 2016
Shulman Home and Studio / Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan +13

  • Architects

  • Location

    Los Angeles, CA, USA
  • Architect in Charge

    Lorcan O’Herlihy, FAIA (Principal-In-Charge), Donnie Schmidt (PM), Lisa Pauli
  • Area

    4000.0 ft2
  • Photographs

Frank Gehry is “a Robert Moses With the Soul of a Jane Jacobs” in This Long-Read on the Los Angeles River

14:00 - 2 January, 2016
Frank Gehry is “a Robert Moses With the Soul of a Jane Jacobs” in This Long-Read on the Los Angeles River, © flickr user smgerdes, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
© flickr user smgerdes, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

A river is not usually the province of an architect. Cities grow around rivers, and buildings are built near rivers, but rarely is the river itself the subject of a design problem. Ever since news broke that Frank Gehry is leading a master plan effort for the Los Angeles River, there has been a marked increase in discussion of the river, though rarely with much historical background. Joseph Giovannini tries to correct this omission with his recent piece in the Los Angeles Review of Books, laying the groundwork from when the Army Corps of Engineers decided to line the river in concrete in the late 1930s to prevent flooding, and introducing all of the major players who have been working more recently to return the river to a more natural state.

This Drone Video of Los Angeles Highlights the City’s Many Murals

09:30 - 25 December, 2015

In this wide-ranging video, drone videographer Ian Wood captures the diversity of the built environment in Los Angeles, featuring architectural gems on equal footing with freeways and freight trains. The buildings and locations featured in the video span over a century of architectural history in LA, and cover the region’s vast geography, including such icons as Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hollyhock House, Cesar Pelli’s Pacific Design Center, Eric Owen MossStealth building, and Morphosis’ recently completed Emerson College Los Angeles.

But what truly sets this video apart is how it highlights the many murals spread throughout the city. Often utilizing otherwise blank facades facing parking lots and alleys, these murals are nonetheless an integral part of LA’s urban fabric, as illustrated in this video. Sadly though, as Wood notes on the video description, there were many more murals that vanished before he was able to get them on video.

In Defense of Kohn Pedersen Fox’s Petersen Automotive Museum

09:30 - 23 December, 2015
In Defense of Kohn Pedersen Fox’s Petersen Automotive Museum, © Chang Kim for KPF
© Chang Kim for KPF

It’s a rare event when a public building is striking enough to grab the attention of most Angelenos. It’s even more curious when that building is almost unanimously panned by the critics. Barring the so-called “iconic” buildings that our city has collected over the last 15 years, Los Angeles seldom received exciting public architecture. Because of this, every new major addition gets placed under a cultural microscope. Now, with Kohn Pedersen Fox’s redesign of the Petersen Automotive Museum nearing completion, architecture critics have sharpened their knives: reviewers have called it “kind of hideous,” "the Edsel of architecture," and “the Guy Fieri of buildings.” But these gripes completely miss the point of what a car museum on the Miracle Mile should be.

© Chang Kim for KPF © Chang Kim for KPF © Chang Kim for KPF © Chang Kim for KPF +8

4 Shortlisted to Revitalize Los Angeles’ Oldest Park

16:00 - 21 December, 2015
4 Shortlisted to Revitalize Los Angeles’ Oldest Park, AD Classics: Pershing Square / Ricardo Legorreta + Laurie Olin. Image © Legorreta + Legorreta, photograph by Lourdes Legorreta
AD Classics: Pershing Square / Ricardo Legorreta + Laurie Olin. Image © Legorreta + Legorreta, photograph by Lourdes Legorreta

Four teams have been chosen to move on to the second stage of the Pershing Square Renew competition. Aiming to transform downtown Los Angeles' oldest park, the finalists will now refine their schematic proposals in preparation of a second review in March 2016. The winning scheme will potentially be the five-acre park's sixth iteration, replacing Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta and landscape architect Laurie Olin current design that first opened in 1994. 

The four teams and their preliminary ideas, include: 

This SOM Archive Video Offers a Look Back at the Early Days of 3D Visualization

09:30 - 10 December, 2015

Until recently, the only options for providing clients and the public with visualizations of what a prospective building would look like were almost exclusively hand drawn renderings, or scale models built by hand. Both of these practices are still in use today, but now there is a much wider range of options with 3D modeling software providing the bulk of renderings, the growing presence of 3D printing, and even video fly-throughs with special effects that rival the latest Hollywood action movie. This 16mm film created by architecture firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) in 1984, and digitized by illustrator Peter Little, reminded us of what the early days of digital 3D modeling looked like.

A Virtual Look Into Pierre Koenig's Case Study House #22, The Stahl House

09:30 - 30 November, 2015

Without a doubt, it’s among the most famous houses in Los Angeles. The house is easy to describe: a steel framed L-plan, divided into bedrooms and the communal living spaces, all wrapped around a turquoise pool seemingly impossibly poised above the city. But words don’t do it justice. Julius Shulman’s 1960 photograph of Pierre Koenig’s Case Study House 22, perhaps better known as Stahl House, changed the fantasies of a generation.

The Dam Collapse that Changed the History of Los Angeles

14:00 - 29 November, 2015

Los Angeles, as we know it today, was made possible by massive infrastructure projects that provide reliable sources of water to the otherwise semi-arid region. The mastermind behind many of these infrastructure projects in the early twentieth century was William Mulholland, the self-taught engineer who rose through the ranks to become the Chief Engineer and General Manager of the Bureau of Water Works and Supply (the precursor to today’s Los Angeles Department of Water and Power). Mulholland is most commonly remembered for the construction of the Los Angeles Aqueduct, which piped water to the city from the Owens Valley, over 200 miles away. But Owens Lake was drying up faster than expected, and the aqueduct was threatened by both earthquakes and sabotage from angry landowners and farmers in the Owens Valley who orchestrated dynamite attacks on the waterway, in what became known as the California Water Wars.

Mulholland needed a backup plan, so he turned to building reservoirs, most of which still function to this day. Tom Scott’s video above tells the story of how one of those reservoirs, and the failure of the dam that held it back, shaped the development of Los Angeles itself. When the St. Francis Dam collapsed in 1928 the ensuing rush of water killed at least 450 people (though some estimate the total is closer to 600), destroyed 1,200 homes, forever altered the reputations of Mulholland and the city’s water infrastructure, and ultimately cemented the boundaries of the city and its neighbors.

AD Classics: Pershing Square / Ricardo Legorreta + Laurie Olin

06:00 - 23 November, 2015
AD Classics: Pershing Square / Ricardo Legorreta + Laurie Olin, © Legorreta + Legorreta, photograph by Lourdes Legorreta
© Legorreta + Legorreta, photograph by Lourdes Legorreta

The recently announced competition to redesign Pershing Square, Los Angeles’ oldest park, will be at least the sixth iteration of the space in the heart of the city’s rapidly changing downtown. Occupying a full city block, what is now Pershing Square (named for the World War I general) was part of the 1781 Spanish land grant to the City of Los Angeles, and was officially dedicated as a park, originally called La Plaza Abaja, in 1866.[1] The current iteration, designed by Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta and landscape architect Laurie Olin, with art installations by Barbara McCarren, opened in 1994. Just over twenty years later, the brightly-colored, geometric stucco structures, and the hardscape-heavy layout have faced extensive criticism–one local website is fond of calling it the city’s “most hated park”–but Legorreta and Olin’s design makes a bold statement for urban public space in Los Angeles, unmatched by any other park in the city.

Cy Twombly Painting Sells for $70.5 Million to Fund OMA's LA Synagogue Extension

16:00 - 12 November, 2015

OMA's first ever building for a religious institution will be constructed with a little help from one of the United States' greatest 20th century artists. In an auction at Sotheby's in New York yesterday, Cy Twombly's 1968 "Untitled (New York City)" - one of the artist's notable "Blackboard Paintings" - sold for $70.5 million, $30 million of which will be donated to LA's Wilshire Boulevard Temple by the painting's owner, Audrey Irmas, to fund the temple's OMA-designed extension.

As reported by the LA Times, the synagogue's new "Audrey Irmas Pavilion" has been designed to be "clearly in dialogue" with the 1929 Byzantine revival temple, and will be used in the celebration of weddings and bar mitzvahs, as well as for meetings, conferences, and gala events by other nonprofit groups. Though the design has not yet been unveiled, the pavilion is currently slated for a 2019 opening.

SL11024 / Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects

11:00 - 12 November, 2015
SL11024 / Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan +20

Can Anyone Win in Architecture Criticism? An Appeal for a "New Sincerity"

09:30 - 9 November, 2015
Can Anyone Win in Architecture Criticism? An Appeal for a "New Sincerity"

In the mid-1980s, after literature had long been held hostage by postmodernist irony and cynicism, a new wave of authors called for an end to negativity, promoting a "new sincerity" for fiction. Gaining momentum into the 1990s, the movement reached a pinnacle in 1993 when, in his essay E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction, pop-culture seer David Foster Wallace, a proponent of this "new sincerity," made the following call to action: “The next real literary ‘rebels’ in this country might well emerge as some weird bunch of anti-rebels, born oglers who dare somehow to back away from ironic watching, who have the childish gall actually to endorse and instantiate single-entendre principles... These anti-rebels would be outdated, of course, before they even started. Dead on the page. Too sincere. Clearly repressed. Backward, quaint, naive, anachronistic. Maybe that’ll be the point. Maybe that’s why they’ll be the next real rebels. Real rebels, as far as I can see, risk disapproval. The old postmodern insurgents risked the gasp and squeal: shock, disgust, outrage, censorship, accusations of socialism, anarchism, nihilism. Today’s risks are different. The new rebels might be artists willing to risk the yawn, the rolled eyes, the cool smile, the nudged ribs, the parody of gifted ironists, the ‘Oh how banal.'"

Architecture, ever in debt to the styles and ideas of other art forms, could learn a thing or two now from the resuscitation of American fiction at the turn of the millennium. It too is enduring an identity crisis, mired by pessimism and uncertainty - a reality made painfully clear this past January when a New York Times Op-Ed by Steven Bingler and Martin C. Pedersen, How to Rebuild Architecture, divided camps and made the design world fume. In the editorial, the authors spoke vehemently of an architectural profession that has become mired by egos and been disconnected from public needs. Things quickly got ugly, critics wrestled with critics and subsequently the public got involved. What no one seemed to take into account is that this type of hounding is at the core of the problem. In its current landscape the discipline has struggled with its past, been deferential to its present, and wrestled with the uncertainty of its future. In a moment when we have become addicted to despondency, can anyone win?