InBetween House / Koji Tsutsui Architect & Associates

© Iwan Baan

Designed by Koji Tsutsui Architect & Associates the InBetween House is a collection of small mountain cottages situated amongst Japanese larch trees in a mountainous region outside of Tokyo.  A retreat from their busy work in the city, the clients wanted a house that could seamlessly blend into the natural surrounding, topography and local culture.

Architects: Koji Tsutsui Architect & Associates
Location: , Nagano, Japan
Project Team: Koji Tsutsui, Satoshi Ohkami
Structural Engineers: ANARCHItects(CG), Hirotsugu Tsuboi
General Contractor: Sasazawa Construction, Inc.
Project Area: 178.43 sqm
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Iwan Baan

Living with Modernity: Brasilia—Chandigarh / Iwan Baan

When I first read John Adams by David McCullough a few years ago I could not decide if I liked Mr. Adams for Mr. Adams or if I liked him for Mr. McCullough’s writing. After viewing ’s newest book, Living with Modernity, I have the same ambiguous feeling about Brasilia and Chandigarh. Baan’s photography of these controversial cities is both subtle and disarming. “[The photographs in this book] do not show how Le Corbusier and Niemeyer thought their cities would look; they show what the cities look like now, fifty to sixty years later.” Without arguing any particular point, Baan documents “what happens when the chilly, impersonal drawing from the past is populated by real, live human beings.” Some discomforting images are reminiscent of what happens when a child places his Tonka Trunk in the middle of an anthill; life follows in and out of structures that relate very little to the realities of daily life. Spaces are simply co-opted for purposes that stand in stark contrast to the intended purpose of the structures. At the same time Baan captures fascinating and brilliant moments of beauty that Niemeyer and Le Corbusier never could have planned for–or the did. As difficult as it is to put stunning photography into words, the short accompanying essay by Cees Nooteboom certainly comes close and is well worth a read. The book closes with a succinct but informative piece by Martino Stierli. Stierli gives the background, historical context, and controversy surrounding the two cities. In the end, I am still ambivalent on whether or not I admire such a ambitious/hubris top-down approach to design, but after seeing the cities in Baan’s book I am certainly fascinated by them—perhaps enough so that I will travel there some day in the future.

‘Concrete Islands’, a photography and video exhibition

Concrete Islands is a group exhibition of photography and video exploring contemporary experiences of utopian architectural projects. For many architects modernism was a physical manifestation of human progress and, as architectural historian Colin Rowe wrote in The Architecture of Good Intentions, “The architect could stipulate an intrinsic connection between the form of his buildings and the condition of society.”

The works in Concrete Islands, by a selection of international contemporary artists, document, celebrate and critique architectural projects designed with inherent social and political values that now exist in various stages of inhabitation, dereliction and destruction.

The exhibition, curated by Elias Redstone for Analix Forever, will feature the works of Andreas Angelidakis, Iwan Baan, Frédéric Chaubin, Mounir Fatmi, and Niklas Goldbach. For more information, please click here.

Guangzhou Opera House / Zaha Hadid Architects

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Architects: Zaha Hadid Architects
Location: Guangzhou, China
Project Director: Woody K.T. Yao, Patrik Schumacher
Project Leader: Simon Yu
Project Team: Jason Guo, Yang Jingwen, Long Jiang, Ta-Kang Hsu, Yi- Ching Liu, Zhi Wang, Christine Chow, Cyril Shing, Filippo Innocenti, Lourdes Sanchez, Hinki Kwong, Junkai Jiang
Local Design Institute: Guangzhou Pearl River Foreign Investment Architectural Designing Institute (Guangzhou, China)
Structural Engineering: SHTK (, China); Guangzhou Pearl River Foreign Investment Architectural Designing Institute
Façade Engineering: KGE Engineering (Zhuhai, China)
Building Services: Guangzhou Pearl River Foreign Investment Architectural Designing Institute (Guangzhou, China)
Acoustic Consultants: Marshall Day Acoustics (Melbourne, Australia)
Theater Consultants: ENFI (Beijing, China)
Lighting Consultant: Beijing Light & View (Beijing, China)
Project Management: Guangzhou Municipal Construction Group Co. Ltd. (Guangzhou, China)
Construction Management: Guangzhou Construction Engineering Supervision Co. Ltd. (Guangzhou, China)
Main Contractor: China Construction Third Engineering Bureau Co. Ltd. (Guangdong, China)
Project Area: 70,000 sqm
Project Year: 2003-2010
Photographs: Iwan Baan

Giant Interactive Group Corporate Headquarters / Morphosis Architects

© Iwan Baan

Architects: Morphosis Architects
Location: Shanghai,
Client: Giant Interactive Group
Project area: 253,300 sqm
Project year: 2006 – 2010
Photographs: Iwan Baan

Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, Brown University / Diller Scofidio + Renfro

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The Perry and Marty Granoff Center for the Creative Arts, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro, recently opened for spring semester classes at Brown University. Providing performance space, exhibitions, installations, and an outdoor amphitheater, the Center’s long structural spans, high ceilings, and large floor plates stimulate a necessary collaborative environment with flexibility. Seeking certification, the exterior venetian blind system and green roof are just a few of the sustainable features for the Granoff Center.

Charles Renfro, partner-in-charge for the project, stated the following about Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s design:

In creating the design for the Granoff Center, we needed structural elements that would stimulate the creative process from virtually every aspect of the building. The Granoff Center is a merger of architectural gesture and academic pedagogy. Our strategy was to encourage and illustrate collaboration across every level.

The six half-levels that make up the Granoff Center were derived from a stacked floor slab system. The three initial floors were divided in half down the length of the building and then offset. This intentional misalignement provided a unique connection between levels, therefore the landings were expanded, providing gathering space for breakout sessions for both students and faculty.

Architects: Diller Scofidio + Renfro
Location: Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Acoustician: JaffeHolden
Construction Management: Shawmut Design & Construction
Project Area: 38,815 sqf
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Iwan Baan

2010 Around the World, an exhibition on Iwan Baan

Mikimoto 2 (Tokyo, Japon) / architecte Toyo Ito / photo

In the wake of Rudy Ricciotti, Patrick Bouchain, Lacaton & Vassal, Luca Merlini, Lefèvre & Aubert, TYIN and Anna Heringer, the villa Noailles wishes to briefly halt an astonishing explorer who endlessly travels the planet in order to observe and capture the architecture of this period, along with the life which evolves within it.

Iwan Baan has been invited to the villa so that he may share his visions, which are like so many stopovers in his many endless trips around the world. He possesses a unique perspective on world architecture, because it is synchronous. But that which interests him is the life and interactions which evolve within and around these new structures, such as the large stadium by Herzog and de Meuron in Peking, or the Learning Center by SANAA in Lausanne, and also the Cultural Center of Medellín in Colombia, or the mud brick Ahmed Baba Library in Timbuktu, Africa.

The exhibition will run from February 20 to March 27. For more information, please click here. You can see Iwan Baan’s photography featured in ArchDaily here.

AIA Honor Awards 2011

© Scott Frances

The Honor Award recipients for 2011 were announced this week and will be honored at the AIA 2011 National Convention in New Orleans. Recognizing excellence in architecture, interior architecture, and regional and urban design, 27 recipients were chosen from over 700 submissions.

Awarded buildings, including links to features on ArchDaily, can be found after the break.

2011 AIA Honor Award / Horizontal Skyscraper / Steven Holl Architects

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There are some buildings that have the power to make one step back and simply enjoy being part of our profession.   For us, Steven Holl’s Horizontal Skyscraper does just that.  As we’ve been sharing with you, it is a project that gracefully hovers above the Shenzhen landscape, allowing both the ground and the elevated ground plane to be occupied.  The project balances the built with the natural as reflecting pools and lush greenery are interspersed with small restaurants and cafes, and as the “sunken cubes” of the main wings of the center – glass volumes offering 360 degree views – strengthen the connection with the landscape.

The building has recently been awarded a 2011 AIA Institute Honor Award for its architectural creativity and contextual thoughtfulness.    The jury commented, “This project skips along from mound to mound and manipulates the landscape – it builds it up and shapes it into a powerful form above the land with inventive manipulation. The building is shading the landscape and letting it breath – integrated sustainability. A reinvented building type with the building floating over the landscape – dancing on the landscape.”

More information, with more photographs from Iwan Baan, after the break.

Theatre Agora / UNStudio

© Christian Richters

Architects: UNStudio in collaboration with B + M, Den Haag
Location: Lelystad,
Project year: 2005-2007
Photographs: Christian Richters, Iwan Baan

New Yorkers top Architectural Events of 2010

© Iwan Baan

This years architectural events in New York are bound to have a meaningful effect on the years to come; the decision by to add another tower complementing I.M Pei’s existing Silver Towers complex (rather than their initial plan to demolish them), the opening of the first section of Brooklyn Bridge Park coupled with the completion of the High Line has re-established New York City as a key model to reference when it comes to designing urban public space, and finally construction began on Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, by , to name a few.

From transportation, urban planning, exhibitions, residential and office buildings follow the break to see the New Yorkers list of some of the most influential decisions surrounding architecture over the past year in New York.

Hypar Pavilion / Diller Scofidio + Renfro with FXFowle

© Iwan Baan

Construction is complete on Hypar Pavilion at Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, situated on the edge of Hearst Plaza and 65th Street, the new free standing structure is the home of a new public lawn and restaurant.

The dual requirements of a destination restaurant and a public green space located within the confines of the Plaza are satisfied with a single architectural gesture sited between the reflecting pool and the plaza’s north edge. Elizabeth Diller comments, “Hypar Pavilion’s moment of invention came when we discovered how to design a destination restaurant without consuming public space on the Lincoln Center campus. The roof became a new kind of interface between public and private, with an occupiable twisting grass canopy over a glass pavilion restaurant.”

Follow the break for more photographs of the new Hypar Pavilion.

Architects: Diller Scofidio + Renfro with FXFOWLE
Location: , New York, USA
Design Team Principals: Elizabeth Diller, Ricardo Scofidio and Charles Renfro
Design Senior Associate: Kevin Rice
Architecture Team: Zoe Small, Haruka Saito, Ann-Rachel Schiffman, Stefan Roeschert, Michael Hundsnurcher, Roman Loretan, Dan Sakai, Chris Andreacola, Anthony Saby, Mateo Antonio de Cardenas, Toshikatsu Kiuchi, Felipe Ferrer, Hallie Terzopolos
Core and Shell Design: Diller Scofidio + Renfro with
Kitchen Design: Yui Design
Lighting: Tillotson Design Associates
SMEP: Ove Arup & Partners
Acoustical: Jaffe Holden
Telephone and Data Consulting: Shen Milsom & Wilke
Construction: Turner Construction
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Iwan Baan

Labels Berlin 2 / HHF Architects

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In response to the large demand of the fashion industry for showroom space, the client conducted an external expert evaluation with an international architectural competition in the spring of 2007 for a new building Labels Berlin 2. In September 2007 the expert commission awarded first prize to the design by HHF Architects.

The new center for fashion, Labels Berlin 2, was conceived to provide showroom space for approximately thirty different international fashion labels. A large event area and small restaurant are located on the ground floor.  The design concept responds to the architecture of the adjacent building.  The interior spaces of this historical building are strongly characterized by the repetition of arched windows used in the façade. This motif became one of the starting points for the design of the project.

After the break you will find more photographs of Labels Berlin 2, along with a more detailed description about the design.

Architects: HHF Architects
Location: , Berlin
Client: Labels Projektmanagment GmbH & Co KG
Project Area: 1,537 sqm
Project Year: 2007-2010
Photographs: Iwan Baan

Iwan Baan receives Julius Shulman Photography Award

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Photographer Iwan Baan received the inaugural Julius Shulman Photography Award in on October 10th.  The Julius Shulman Institute at Woodbury University will honor the legacy of the renowned photographer during a series of events that coincide with the 100th anniversary of the day of his birth. The image.architecture.now exhibit is currently featuring Iwan Baan along with 9 photographers all whose work illuminates a range of explorations into documenting the experience of space.  This exhibit is at Ahmanson Main Space at Woodbury University until October 23rd.

Remez Arlozorov / Mayslits Kassif Architects

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Architects: Mayslits Kassif Architects
Location: Arlozorov Street, Tel Aviv,
Design Team: Udi Kassif, Ganit Mayslits Kassif, Maor Roytman
Program: A mixed use building containing kindergarten cluster and municipal welfare offices.
Client: The Tel Aviv-Yafo Economic Development Authority Ltd.
Site Area: 6,000 sqm
Built Area: 3,000 sqm
Budget: $5,000,000
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Iwan Baan, Yuval Tebol

Kanagawa Institute of Technology Workshop / Junya Ishigami

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Check out Junya Ishigami and Associates amazing studio + workspace where students of the Kanagawa Institute of Technology get to spend their days designing.  The studio is about the closest you can get to the feeling of working outside while being indoors.  The floor-to-ceiling makes the building appear weightless and elegant, and the open plan preserves the building’s sense of transparency as the viewer’s eye can shoot directly across the uninterrupted space.  305 columns of various sizes support the stripped roof of skylights, yet their white color keeps the focus on the space and the view, not the structure.    The columns, although seemingly random, as specifically placed to create the sensation of zoned spaces, but their nonrestrictive quality provides a flexible layout to suit the changing needs of students.

Inspiring place to design in, wouldn’t you agree?

More photographs by Iwan Baan after the break.

Update: Pole Dance / SO-IL, by Iwan Baan

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We are sure that SO-IL‘s PS1 installation, Pole Dance, will be a hit this summer.  On Friday we had a preview by Alan R Tansey and today, we found at Iwan Baan’s website another view on the installation.  We hope you’ll be able to visit the project in person sometime.

Complete photoset at Iwan’s website, some photos after the break:

Horizontal Skyscraper / Steven Holl

© Iwan Baan

Our friend and architecture photographer, Iwan Baan , just published on his website some of his recently shot images of Steven Holl’s Horizontal Skyscraper in Shenzhen, China .  The project is a long mixed-use complex which includes office spaces, apartments, a hotel and even a public landscape.  Baan’s photos illustrate Holl’s idea that the “building appears as if it were once floating on a higher sea that has now subsided; leaving the structure propped up high on eight legs.”

Complete photoset at Iwan’s website, more images and more about the project after the break.