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How WeWork Experiments On Itself to Advance the Field of Office Design

10:23 - 12 July, 2016
How WeWork Experiments On Itself to Advance the Field of Office Design, The potted plants, images of trees on the giant light fixtures from Alex Allen Studio, and even a show tree help people make a connection to nature at work, which creative director Devin Vermeulen says is “proven to make people more creative, less stressed”. Image © Lauren Kallen
The potted plants, images of trees on the giant light fixtures from Alex Allen Studio, and even a show tree help people make a connection to nature at work, which creative director Devin Vermeulen says is “proven to make people more creative, less stressed”. Image © Lauren Kallen

In this article, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Redefining (and Redesigning) The Way WeWork," Anne Quito visits WeWork's offices in New York to discover how the company is using its own headquarters as the test bed for its future product offering.

In a nondescript building in New York’s Chelsea neighborhood, the global headquarters of WeWork buzzes with creative energy. In just a little over six years, the start-up at the forefront of the coworking-space rental boom has created a $16 billion operation with 50,000 members in 28 cities, with 96 locations announced for this year.

Spread across two and a half floors, the 50,000-square-foot headquarters is the home base for WeWork’s almost-700-strong New York–based staff and serves as a laboratory for its designers.

WeWork’s designers think of the giant staircase that connects three floors of its headquarters as a series of occasional meeting spaces, but also as a kind of indoor park. Image © Lauren Kallen Gathering spaces at WeWork’s headquarters offer a wide range of options in terms of informality and noise levels. The café tends to be fairly energetic. Image © Lauren Kallen The in-house recording studio has a contemporary flair. Image © Lauren Kallen Every WeWork location has some local element; the headquarters has a mural featuring a timeline of New York musicians—from rock and roll to hip-hop—along a narrow corridor. Image © Lauren Kallen +7

AD Classics: The Barbican Estate / Chamberlin, Powell and Bon Architects

04:00 - 12 July, 2016
AD Classics: The Barbican Estate / Chamberlin, Powell and Bon Architects, © Joas Souza
© Joas Souza

On the 29th December, 1940, at the height of the Second World War, an air raid by the Luftwaffe razed a 35-acre site in the heart of the City of London to the ground. The site was known as the Barbican (a Middle English word meaning fortification), so-called for the Roman wall which once stood in the area. Following the war, the City of London Corporation—the municipal governing body for the area—started to explore possibilities to bring this historic site into the twentieth century.

© Joas Souza © Joas Souza Gilbert House piloti. Image © Joas Souza Defoe House. Image © Joas Souza +28

Have You Found Any Pokémon Near Famous Landmarks in Pokémon GO? Show Us!

12:16 - 11 July, 2016

Unless you've been living under a Geodude for the past few days, you'll have heard about the launch of Pokémon GO, the latest release from the world-conquering Pokémon franchise and Niantic, the people behind the groundbreaking 2013 game Ingress. The game's central premise is that, using augmented reality, the classic creature-capturing game that we've known for the past 20 years can be overlaid onto the real world, requiring players to get out and explore their surroundings to find the Pokémon lurking in the streets and parks of their neighborhood.

Of course, the game's augmented reality element allows for some interesting juxtapositions between the real world and the game world, and opens up a new kind of "wildlife photography"—as exemplified by the above image of a Krabby at Sydney Harbor, captured on a mass "Pokémon GO walk" that was organized in the city over the weekend. We'd like to see our readers' best snaps of Pokémon alongside famous landmarks. Have you seen a Staryu at the Statue of Liberty? A Grimer at the Golden Gate Bridge? A Weepinbell at the Washington Memorial? We want to see it!

Upload your very best shots in the comments, and we'll feature our favorites in an upcoming article.

INTERIORS: Mr. Robot

09:30 - 11 July, 2016
Courtesy of INTERIORS Journal
Courtesy of INTERIORS Journal

Interiors is an online film and architecture publication, published by Mehruss Jon Ahi and Armen Karaoghlanian. Interiors runs an exclusive column for ArchDaily that analyzes and diagrams films in terms of space. Their Official Store will carry exclusive prints from these posts.

The visual medium of film has meant that style has always played a significant role in cinema. It’s one of the reasons why film and architecture have gone hand in hand for the past hundred years. In some sense, both mediums display complementary qualities; film as photography captures the structural aspects of architecture, while architectural design dictates cinematic space.

The same can’t be said for television – because even though television has undergone an aesthetic transformation in the past few years, with shows like The Sopranos, Mad Men, Breaking Bad, True Detective, and The Knick, it’s still very much a character-based medium. The format itself allows for the close examination of characters over the course of many hours.

Bee Breeders Reveal Winning Designs for a LGBT Youth Asylum Center in Uganda

12:00 - 10 July, 2016
Bee Breeders Reveal Winning Designs for a LGBT Youth Asylum Center in Uganda, First Prize Winner "Ugandan LGBT Youth Asylum" by Enrico Chinellato and Jacopo Donato  . Image via Bee Breeders
First Prize Winner "Ugandan LGBT Youth Asylum" by Enrico Chinellato and Jacopo Donato . Image via Bee Breeders

Bee Breeders, organizers of international architectural competitions, have announced this week the three winners and six honorable mentions of their Uganda LGBT Youth Asylum Center competition. Inspired by recent activism in Uganda, Bee Breeders sought the design of a community center to welcome those in the LGBT community who have been ostracized from their home environments. The judges said that they were looking for designs that focused on social integration, not isolation, celebrating those who created "a community center, not a prison."

First Prize Winner "Ugandan LGBT Youth Asylum" by Enrico Chinellato and Jacopo Donato  . Image via Bee Breeders First Prize Winner "Ugandan LGBT Youth Asylum" by Enrico Chinellato and Jacopo Donato  . Image via Bee Breeders Second Prize Winner "Ugandan LGBT Youth Asylum" by Marcelo Venzon, Julia Park, Guilherme Pardini and João Paulo Carrascoza. Image via Bee Breeders Third Prize Winner "Ugandan LGBT Youth Asylum" by Tatiana Ioannidou and Chariton Lazarides. Image via Bee Breeders +29

Watch Almost 6,000 Years of Human Urbanization Unfold Before Your Eyes in This Video

09:40 - 9 July, 2016

From the Cradle of Civilization in ancient Mesopotamia to the modern urban explosion in China, cities are among the most obvious and dramatic evidence of human existence. In a recent paper published in Scientific Data, a team led by Yale University researcher Meredith Reba mapped the emergence of cities between 3,700 BC and 2,000 AD based on when their populations were first recorded in historical accounts.

Taking the data from this study, Max Galka of Metrocosm has produced this fascinating animation showing the history of cities worldwide. "Most datasets available go back only a few years or decades at most. This is the first one I've seen that covers 6 millennia," Galka told CityLab. "I'm a big fan of history, so after reading the study, I thought it would be interesting to visualize the data and see if it offers some perspective." The steady flow of time may seem a little slow at first, but stick with it through the early BC years and the shifts in urban development start to get intriguing. And—spoiler alert—buckle up as you approach the 20th century.

This Ecological Cultural Center is Designed to Celebrate the Tradition of Marimba Music

16:10 - 8 July, 2016
This Ecological Cultural Center is Designed to Celebrate the Tradition of Marimba Music, Courtesy of Caá Porá Arquitectos
Courtesy of Caá Porá Arquitectos

The offices of Caá Porá, Siete86 and Ingeniera Alternativa have released designs for “Palenque Cultural Tambillo,” a cultural center dedicated to the artistic tradition of marimba music in the Afroecuadorean town of Tambillo, Ecuador. Consisting of a performance and meeting hall, two multi-use classrooms, rehearsal spaces, an artisanal instrument workshop and ecologically friendly public bathrooms, the project is planned to become one piece of a network of cultural centers to be built in the UNESCO heritage province of Esmeraldas.

Courtesy of Caá Porá Arquitectos Courtesy of Caá Porá Arquitectos Courtesy of Caá Porá Arquitectos Courtesy of Caá Porá Arquitectos +7

How the AIA's Committee on the Environment Can Ensure Its Own Obsolescence

10:30 - 8 July, 2016
How the AIA's Committee on the Environment Can Ensure Its Own Obsolescence, The Edith Green – Wendell Wyatt Federal Building, designed by SERA Architects with Cutler Anderson Architects, the 2016 AIA/Cote Top Ten Plus Winner. Image © Nic Lehoux
The Edith Green – Wendell Wyatt Federal Building, designed by SERA Architects with Cutler Anderson Architects, the 2016 AIA/Cote Top Ten Plus Winner. Image © Nic Lehoux

This article by Kira Gould was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "The Case for COTE's Obsolescence."

Recently the American Institute of Architects Committee on the Environment published, for the first time, a comprehensive report about the winners from the debut year (1997) through 2015: “Lessons from the Leading Edge.” Its lead author, a current COTE advisory board member, Lance Hosey, set out to review two decades of Top Ten winners as a group to see how performance is changing over time, how the winners size up (scale, cost, type), and more.

The result is a compelling report. It reveals that these high-performing projects skew small. That performance gains and metrics, particularly real-time performance metrics, are improving each year. That the leading projects tend to be expensive. On average, they come in at $537 per square foot. “The cost data shows us that we need more compelling examples of lower-cost, higher performance projects,” Hosey says. Clearly, more exemplars at greater scale, type, and cost variation would be beneficial to both the profession and the market.

6 Castle Fortresses Across Europe, as Selected by Sketchfab

09:30 - 7 July, 2016
6 Castle Fortresses Across Europe, as Selected by Sketchfab

Today, thanks to our partnership with Sketchfab, we take you on a virtual tour of some of the most breathtaking historic fortresses across Europe. The design of castles and fortress complexes are particularly interesting because of their strategic siting and defense mechanisms. As strongholds of territorial claim, fortress complexes are meant to be self-sustaining in times of conflict and contain not only defense fortifications but a suite of supporting structures such as chapels, schools, and housing. This effectively turns fortress complexes into a village within a village. These richly detailed scans hosted on Sketchfab allow us to see in detail the urban planning strategies of different historic periods and places.

For a more immersive experience, all of these models can be viewed on a virtual reality headset such as Google Cardboard.

Project of the Month: Estonian National Museum

06:00 - 7 July, 2016
Project of the Month: Estonian National Museum, © Takuji Shimmura
© Takuji Shimmura

For the last three centuries, museums -as an architectural typology- have transitioned from being an important node in the city to becoming an icon of identity for a whole culture. Museums have transformed into a civic landmark in a local and international scale.

This month we highlight the Estonian National Museum which not only proposes a strategy for meeting spaces and exhibition, but also stands as a cultural, historic and territorial recognition of the country. Placed as an extension of the ruins of an old aeronautical field used during the Soviet occupation, the museum contrasts it’s historic context with a new building that rises as the projection to a new reality and a national future.

C.F. Møller Designs New Headquarters for LEGO

12:00 - 6 July, 2016
C.F. Møller Designs New Headquarters for LEGO, Courtesy of C.F. Møller
Courtesy of C.F. Møller

Danish firm CF Møller have been tapped by the LEGO Group to design a 52,000 square meter (560,000 square foot) global hub for the company’s headquarters in Billund, Denmark. The design, which draws inspiration from the colored modular bricks for which LEGO is known, will provide new flexible work arrangements and community spaces centered around a brightly lit 4-story atrium, as well as a new public park for the campus.

From Productivism to Scenography: The Relighting of Norman Foster's Hongkong and Shanghai Bank

10:30 - 6 July, 2016

Three decades ago the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank (HSBC) Headquarters by Norman Foster emerged onto the architectural seen as an exemplary product of industrial design. The open layout with its exposed steel structure generated a powerful corporate identity for the bank. But the restrained atmosphere of white architectural lighting and the lack of distinctive façade lighting has lost its attractiveness after sunset. Now the colorful and dynamic relighting presents a remarkable example of how an architectural icon has shifted from a productivist ideology towards a scenographic image. To the western observer the multicolored light language may give off a playful impression, but to the local culture the transformation evokes grandiosity.

Hongkong and Shanghai Bank Headquarters, Hong Kong, in 2015. Architects: Foster + Partners. Photographer: Simon McCartney. Image © illumination Physics Hongkong and Shanghai Bank Headquarters, Hong Kong, 1986. Architects: Foster + Partners. Lighting design: Claude and Danielle Engle Lighting. Photographer: Ian Lambot. Image © ERCO, www.erco.com Hongkong and Shanghai Bank Headquarters, Hong Kong, in 1986. Architects: Foster + Partners. Lighting design: Claude and Danielle Engle Lighting. Photographer: Ian Lambot. Image © ERCO, www.erco.com Hongkong and Shanghai Bank Headquarters, Hong Kong, in 2015. Architects: Foster + Partners. Photographer: Simon McCartney. Image © illumination Physics +12

How Migration Will Define the Future of Urbanism and Architecture

11:20 - 5 July, 2016
How Migration Will Define the Future of Urbanism and Architecture, The entrance to the Forum Karlín during reSITE 2016. Image © Dorota Velek
The entrance to the Forum Karlín during reSITE 2016. Image © Dorota Velek

When we started talking about migration [as a conference theme], everybody said ‘don’t do it, it’s too controversial.’ We said that’s exactly why we’re going to do it.

This defiant attitude was how Martin Barry, Chairman of reSITE, opened their 2016 Conference in Prague three weeks ago. Entitled “Cities in Migration,” the conference took place against a background of an almost uncountable number of challenging political issues related to migration. In Europe, the unfolding Syrian refugee crisis has strained both political and race relations across the continent; in America, Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump has led a populist knee-jerk reaction against both Mexicans and Muslims; and in the United Kingdom—a country only on the periphery of most attendees’ consciousness at the time—the decision in favor of “Brexit” that took place a week after the conference was largely predicated upon limiting the immigration of not only Syrians, but also of European citizens from other, less wealthy EU countries.

In architecture, such issues have been highlighted this year by Alejandro Aravena’s Venice Biennale, with architects “Reporting from the Front” in battles against, among other things, these migration-related challenges. From refugee camps to slums to housing crises in rich global cities, the message is clear: migration is a topic that architects must understand and respond to. As a result, the lessons shared during reSITE’s intensive two-day event will undoubtedly be invaluable to the architectural profession.

We're Collecting the Best Studio Projects from Universities Worldwide - Submit Your Work!

08:00 - 4 July, 2016
We're Collecting the Best Studio Projects from Universities Worldwide - Submit Your Work!, Some of the projects featured in last year's article
Some of the projects featured in last year's article

It's graduation time. As universities around the globe - or at least most in the Northern hemisphere, where over 80% of the world's universities are located - come to the end of the academic year, many university architecture studios have recently closed out the construction of pavilions, installations and other small educational projects. Last year at ArchDaily, with the help of our readers, we were able to round up some of the best pavilions, installations and experimental structures created by students from all over the world. The resulting article was among our most popular of the year, demonstrating people's huge appetite to see the work of the next generation of young architects.

That's why we're once again teaming up with all of ArchDaily en Español, ArchDaily Brasil, and ArchDaily China, asking our readers to submit their projects, so that we can present the best work from graduating students worldwide. Read on to find out how you can take part.

Discover the Grit and Glory of New Belgrade's Communist Architecture

09:30 - 2 July, 2016
Discover the Grit and Glory of New Belgrade's Communist Architecture, © Piotr Bednarski
© Piotr Bednarski

In the autumn of 2014, Piotr Bednarski, a Warsaw-based architectural photographer, visited the municipality of Novi Beograd (New Belgrade), a planned city built in 1948 which constitutes one of Belgrade Serbia’s 17 municipalities. There, he quickly fell in love with the gritty Communist-era architecture of the area. He writes:

In Warsaw, where I'm from, most of the residential buildings from the Communist era [have been] turned into kitschy, colorful blocks… Seeing the dense, raw and, desolate modernist architecture, and rediscovering the atmosphere of my childhood made me fall in love with Novi's neighborhood. I saw people from different social backgrounds living peacefully in one place.

Since that initial trip, Piotr has made multiple return visits to capture the city in a variety of thought-provoking ways, showing long span views of the city, the streetscape, and even the view from inside people’s apartments. He believes that there is much to uncover in Novi Beograd, and that his story with New Belgrade is not yet finished.

© Piotr Bednarski © Piotr Bednarski © Piotr Bednarski © Piotr Bednarski +33

Barack Obama Presidential Center Selects Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects

13:26 - 30 June, 2016
Barack Obama Presidential Center Selects Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects, Previous work by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architecture. Images © Michael Moran, Norman McGrath and Tom Rossiter
Previous work by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architecture. Images © Michael Moran, Norman McGrath and Tom Rossiter

The Obama Foundation has selected Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects (TWBTA) with partner Interactive Design Architects (IDEA) to lead the design of the Obama Presidential Center for Chicago's South Side. Chosen from a shortlist including Diller Scofidio + Renfro, John Ronan Architects, Renzo Piano Building Workshop, SHoP Architects, Snøhetta and Adjaye Associates, TWBTA stood out for their “commitment to explore the best ways of creating an innovative center for action that inspires communities and individuals to take on our biggest challenges.”

AD Classics: Parish of the Holy Sacrifice / Leandro V. Locsin

04:00 - 30 June, 2016
AD Classics: Parish of the Holy Sacrifice / Leandro V. Locsin, Courtesy of Wikimedia user Allan Jay Quesada
Courtesy of Wikimedia user Allan Jay Quesada

Once dubbed a “flying saucer,” the Parish (Church) of the Holy Sacrifice is a Modernist expression which embodies the complex colonial history of the Philippines. Located on a university campus in Quezon City (formerly the capital of the nation, now a part of the Metro Manila National Capital Region), the domed concrete church was the product of Filipino architect Leandro Locsin, and of three other national artists who contributed to the building’s interior.[1] Locsin’s design, which combines elements of traditional Filipino architecture with postwar International aesthetics, is a potent symbol of a newly-independent nation following centuries of imperial control.

Courtesy of Wikimedia user Ramon FVelasquez Courtesy of Wikimedia user Ramon FVelasquez Courtesy of Wikimedia user Ramon FVelasquez Courtesy of Wikimedia user Ramon FVelasquez +7

Material Focus: The Great Wall of WA by Luigi Rosselli

10:00 - 29 June, 2016
Material Focus: The Great Wall of WA by Luigi Rosselli ,  The Great Wall of WA / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch
The Great Wall of WA / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch

This article is part of our new "Material Focus" series, which asks architects to elaborate on the thought process behind their material choices and sheds light on the steps required to get buildings actually built.

The Great Wall of WA, designed by the Australian firm Luigi Rosselli Architects, and selected as one of Archdaily’s Best Building of the Year 2016, provides a unique example of rammed earth construction. At 230 meters in length, the Great Wall of WA is the longest structure of its kind in Australia and possibly the South Hemisphere, according to its architects. Built in remote North Western Australia, the building is made from locally available materials whose thermal properties help it to endure a variable climate. We spoke with the architect Luigi Rosselli to learn more about his compelling choice of material and the determining role it played in his concept design.

 The Great Wall of WA / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch  The Great Wall of WA / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch  The Great Wall of WA / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch  The Great Wall of WA / Luigi Rosselli. Image © Edward Birch +13