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This Photoseries Captures the State of China’s Renowned Architectural Icons

06:00 - 20 April, 2017
This Photoseries Captures the State of China’s Renowned Architectural Icons, © Kris Provoost
© Kris Provoost

A simultaneous celebration of their cultural iconicity and distillation from their various contexts, Beautified China is a photographic essay by Kris Provoost (one-half of the vlogging duo behind #donotsettle) that tracks the evolution of Chinese architectural landmarks over the course of the past 7 years. Beginning his investigation with the 2010 World Expo in Shanghai, Provoost considers a decade of architecture proposed for China by the profession’s biggest names, many of which have been built now with monumental reputations in rising cities. 

“Most ‘starchitects’ had their chance to build, or to fulfill their wildest dreams,” explains Provoost. “Some of them became landmarks: CCTV headquarters by Rem Koolhaas and Ole Scheeren or the Bird’s Nest/National Stadium by Herzog and de Meuron for example. Others have turned a suburb into a new center, or have established a new city on its own.”

International Youth Centre / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Kris Provoost China Pavilion / JingTang. Image © Kris Provoost British Pavilion / Heatherwick Studio. Image © Kris Provoost Galaxy SOHO / Zaha Hadid Architects. Image © Kris Provoost +22

Call for Entries: Hong Kong Young Architects & Designers Competition

19:30 - 13 April, 2017
Call for Entries: Hong Kong Young Architects & Designers Competition, Courtesy of West Kowloon Cultural District
Courtesy of West Kowloon Cultural District

The West Kowloon Cultural District Authority (WKCDA) announces the launch of its very first Hong Kong Young Architects & Designers Competition. Envisaged to provide a platform for emerging architects and designers to showcase their creativity and potential, as well as gain valuable experience, the competition invites young professionals to participate in an innovative challenge to design a Temporary Pavilion, to be built inside the Nursery Park at the West Kowloon Cultural District.  

The Singularity of the Skyscraper: Studies in Form and Façade

04:00 - 11 April, 2017
The Singularity of the Skyscraper: Studies in Form and Façade, New York. Image © Florian W. Mueller
New York. Image © Florian W. Mueller

Florian W. Mueller's Singularity series is, in the photographer's own words, "just the building – reduced to the max." These deceptively simple shots of the summits of skyscrapers from around Europe and North America, each set against in infinite gradient of sky, are symbols of architecture's effort to reach ever higher in evermore unique ways. For Mueller, who is based in Cologne, they are an attempt at abstraction. In isolation—and especially when viewed together—they are remarkably revealing as studies of form and façade.

Cologne. Image © Florian W. Mueller Hong Kong. Image © Florian W. Mueller Hamburg. Image © Florian W. Mueller London. Image © Florian W. Mueller +21

Call for Participants: urbanactionsHK - International Symposium and Workshop

09:35 - 23 March, 2017
Call for Participants: urbanactionsHK - International Symposium and Workshop, urbanactionsHK Poster
urbanactionsHK Poster

The inadequate provision of open spaces in urban areas is one of the most recurrent challenges for the Hong Kong government. High-quality open public spaces can significantly increase a city’s attractiveness by encouraging business investment and improving living conditions.

The Leadenhall Building In London Acquired By Chinese Investors in Record-Breaking Sale

08:00 - 5 March, 2017
The Leadenhall Building In London Acquired By Chinese Investors in Record-Breaking Sale, © Richard Bryant
© Richard Bryant

The Leadenhall Building, designed by Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, has been sold to a Chinese property magnate for a price of £1.15 billion, in what has become the second-biggest sale of a UK building in history, as well as one of China’s largest acquisitions of UK real estate. The transaction involved developer British Land and its partner Oxford Properties, who sold the tower to CC Land, a Hong Kong based company.

Tim Roberts, head of offices and residential at British Land, said: “British Land and Oxford Properties took a bold step at the early stages of the UK’s economic recovery to develop the Leadenhall Building to generate a high-quality, long-term income stream,” said Tim Roberts, head of offices and residential at British Land. “This sale shows continued investor appetite for best-in-class, well-located property in London.”

© Paul Raftery © Paul Raftery © Lee Mawdsley © Richard Bryant +7

Call for Ideas: Hong Kong Pixel Homes

08:00 - 24 February, 2017
Call for Ideas: Hong Kong Pixel Homes, Enter the Hong Kong Pixel Homes ‪#‎architecture‬ ‪#‎competition‬ now!  US $6,000 in prize money! Closing date for registration: APRIL 26, 2017
Enter the Hong Kong Pixel Homes ‪#‎architecture‬ ‪#‎competition‬ now! US $6,000 in prize money! Closing date for registration: APRIL 26, 2017

Hong Kong is one of the most expensive and densely populated cities on Earth. With over 7 million people living on an island just 1,102 square km in size, where the population is constantly struggling for space. Like other major cities around the world, Hong Kong is in the midst of an affordable housing crisis. The strict limitations on space mean that there is a capped supply of housing on the island. A limited supply, paired with an ever-growing demand, has caused Hong Kong housing prices to skyrocket.

Public Park Promotes Native Biodiversity in Hong Kong

16:00 - 29 January, 2017
Public Park Promotes Native Biodiversity in Hong Kong, © Gustafson Porter + Bowman
© Gustafson Porter + Bowman

Gustafson Porter + Bowman has unveiled plans for Taikoo Place, a new public space for Hong Kong that will include lush native vegetation and sculptural water features. Encompassing 69,000 square feet, the landscape project will feature a variety of spaces, from small, intimate areas for conversation, to larger open areas suitable for special events like concerts and outdoor markets.

© Gustafson Porter + Bowman © Gustafson Porter + Bowman © Gustafson Porter + Bowman © Kathryn Gustafson for Gustafson Porter + Bowman +8

Michael Wolf Explains the Vision Behind his Hong Kong Photo Series, “Architecture of Density”

16:10 - 3 January, 2017

I see it a bit as my mission to document things in Hong Kong which are vanishing, which are disappearing, primarily through urban renewal

In this short film from Yitiao Video, photographer Michael Wolf explains the vision behind his momentous photo series, “Architecture of Density,” in which he captures the immense scale and incredible intricacies of the city of Hong Kong.

After living in city for 9 years and travelling abroad to work, Wolf describes the somewhat unpleasant circumstances which led him to turn his attention to his own environment.

M CO Design Unveils Dragon-Inspired Infrastructural Designs for Hong Kong

16:00 - 3 December, 2016
M CO Design Unveils Dragon-Inspired Infrastructural Designs for Hong Kong, Courtesy of M CO Design
Courtesy of M CO Design

M CO Design has released its designs for “Dragon’s Link,” a new dragon-inspired, mixed-use infrastructure on the south side of Hong Kong Island “that will serve a large part of the community and will enhance a local historic monument,” the Tai Tam Dam, which will celebrate its 100th anniversary this coming February. 

Drawing inspiration from local traditions and the natural topography of Hong Kong, the project will create new connections within an existing network of roads and hiking trails in Tai Tam Country Park in “a juxtaposition of old and new,” in order to improve user experience and infrastructure.

Courtesy of Unknown Courtesy of M CO Design Courtesy of M CO Design Courtesy of M CO Design +17

Here's What Western Accounts of the Kowloon Walled City Don't Tell You

09:30 - 2 December, 2016
Here's What Western Accounts of the Kowloon Walled City Don't Tell You, Image © Greg Girard and Ian Lambot, authors of the books "City of Darkness" and "<a href='http://www.archdaily.com/493900/the-architecture-of-kowloon-walled-city-an-excerpt-from-city-of-darkness-revisited'>City of Darkness Revisited</a>"
Image © Greg Girard and Ian Lambot, authors of the books "City of Darkness" and "City of Darkness Revisited"

A longer version of this article, written by current ArchDaily intern Sharon Lam, was originally published in Salient, the magazine of the Victoria University of Wellington Students’ Association, titled "In the Shadow of the Kowloon Walled City."

It is the 1970s in Hong Kong, and you are eleven years old. Early one evening, you go out to a nearby neighborhood for dinner with your family. A five-minute walk from your primary school, it is also a place you frequent with your friends. The food here is good and especially renowned for its fishball noodle soup, which is what you always get. You’ve been here so often that navigating the subterranean corridors to the noodle stand is easy, and you know where to step to avoid the ceilings that drip the most. Your bowl of noodles arrives and you slurp them down, unaware of the fact that over the next couple of years this very neighborhood will peak in its population and its infamy, and remain even decades later as one of the most remarkable social anomalies in recent history.

At its peak, the Kowloon Walled City was home to 33,000 people in just two hectares of land—the size of about two rugby fields—making it the densest place on Earth at the time. It was a hastily put together conglomerate of tiny apartments, one on top of the other, caged balconies slapped onto the sides and connected through a labyrinth of damp, dark corridors. All the while, the rest of Hong Kong went about as normal, seemingly unaffected by the crime and squalor within the Walled City.

Aedas Wins Two International Competitions to Design Airports in Shenzhen and Hong Kong

16:00 - 23 November, 2016
Aedas Wins Two International Competitions to Design Airports in Shenzhen and Hong Kong, Shenzhen Airport Satellite Concourse, China, by Aedas. Image Courtesy of Aedas
Shenzhen Airport Satellite Concourse, China, by Aedas. Image Courtesy of Aedas

Aedas have recently won two international competitions to design international airport buildings: the Shenzhen Airport Satellite Concourse and Hong Kong International Airport Third Runway Passenger Building.

In recent years, Aedas have emerged as a leader in airport design, as they are also currently working on the Hong Kong International Airport Terminal 2 Expansion, and have previously worked on Hong Kong International Airport Midfield Concourse and North Satellite Concourse. With the two newly-won projects, Aedas hopes to reinforce their strength and growing influence in airport design.

URBANLOGIC Arts Factory Awarded Silver at 2016 American Architecture Prize

12:00 - 20 November, 2016
© URBANLOGIC
© URBANLOGIC

The annual AAP American Architecture Prize, which recognizes outstanding architectural design, interior design, and landscape architecture worldwide, has given URBANLOGIC's Sichuan Arts Factory and Innovation Center a Silver Award in the mixed-use category. The panel of judges included Troy C. Therrien of the Guggenheim Foundation and Museum, Peggy Deamer of Yale University, Ben Van Berkel of UNStudio and Harvard University Graduate School of Design, and Alan Ricks and Michael Murphy, founders of Mass Design Group. 

© URBANLOGIC © URBANLOGIC © URBANLOGIC © URBANLOGIC +15

Call for Submissions: WSBE17 Hong Kong (International Youth Competition)

18:15 - 3 November, 2016
Call for Submissions: WSBE17 Hong Kong (International Youth Competition), Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown

WSBE17 Hong Kong is the world conference of the 2015-2017 cycle of the renowned SBE Conference Series, it is the most influential and well-attended Sustainable Built Conference held every 3 years. With the theme of ‘Transforming Our Built Environment through Innovation and Integration: Putting Ideas into Action’, it is expected to attract over 1800 policy makers, industry practitioners and green-building advocates from over 50 countries.

The World's Most Creative Neighborhoods: Metropolis Names Mumbai, Lagos and Lisbon Among Top Ten

09:31 - 2 October, 2016
The World's Most Creative Neighborhoods: Metropolis Names Mumbai, Lagos and Lisbon Among Top Ten, Avenidas Novas in Lisbon. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lisboa_Avenida_Novas.jpg'>Wikimedia user Cruks</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
Avenidas Novas in Lisbon. Image © Wikimedia user Cruks licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0

From Yaba in Lagos to the suburb of Bandra in Mumbai, Metropolis Magazine provides a scenic tour around the world’s “most creative” neighborhoods. Spread across ten rapidly growing cities like Cape Town and Turin, the article provides a comprehensive glimpse into these lesser discussed hubs of creativity.

Watch How Bamboo Scaffolding Was Used to Build Hong Kong's Skyscrapers

14:45 - 15 August, 2016
© flickr user ahmcdowall. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0
© flickr user ahmcdowall. Licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

In the late 20th century, restricted by an a small landmass and extreme terrain, the Hong Kong urban area grew to become one of the densest and most vertical places on the planet, with more buildings taller than 500 feet than any other city in the world. But instead of the steel or aluminum structures used as scaffolding in Europe and the Western Hemisphere, the majority of skyscrapers built in Hong Kong and much of Asia used scaffolding systems constructed out of bamboo.

To create the structures, the high strength, lightweight material is strapped together with plastic ties by construction crews, who also use the structure as a ladder for scaling the building. Despite using few safety restraints, crews are able to construct up to 1,000 square feet of bamboo scaffolding in just one day. To protect the structure, nylon gauze is sometimes draped along the outside.

Check out a series of GIFs and images showing how it works after the break. And if you're interested in learning more about bamboo construction materials, check out our Materials catalog.

Golden Bubbles / People's Architecture Office

18:00 - 10 August, 2016
Golden Bubbles / People's Architecture Office, Courtesy of People's Architecture Office
Courtesy of People's Architecture Office

Courtesy of People's Architecture Office Courtesy of People's Architecture Office Courtesy of People's Architecture Office Courtesy of People's Architecture Office +20

  • Architects

  • Location

    K11, Hong Kong, China
  • Architect in Charge

    He Zhe, James Shen, Zang Feng
  • Design Team

    Cui Gangjian, Min Kyoung Kim, Xu Xi, Xiang Weixing, Jiang Hao, Zhang Zhen
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

    Courtesy of People's Architecture Office

From Productivism to Scenography: The Relighting of Norman Foster's Hongkong and Shanghai Bank

10:30 - 6 July, 2016

Three decades ago the Hongkong and Shanghai Bank (HSBC) Headquarters by Norman Foster emerged onto the architectural seen as an exemplary product of industrial design. The open layout with its exposed steel structure generated a powerful corporate identity for the bank. But the restrained atmosphere of white architectural lighting and the lack of distinctive façade lighting has lost its attractiveness after sunset. Now the colorful and dynamic relighting presents a remarkable example of how an architectural icon has shifted from a productivist ideology towards a scenographic image. To the western observer the multicolored light language may give off a playful impression, but to the local culture the transformation evokes grandiosity.

Hongkong and Shanghai Bank Headquarters, Hong Kong, in 2015. Architects: Foster + Partners. Photographer: Simon McCartney. Image © illumination Physics Hongkong and Shanghai Bank Headquarters, Hong Kong, 1986. Architects: Foster + Partners. Lighting design: Claude and Danielle Engle Lighting. Photographer: Ian Lambot. Image © ERCO, www.erco.com Hongkong and Shanghai Bank Headquarters, Hong Kong, in 1986. Architects: Foster + Partners. Lighting design: Claude and Danielle Engle Lighting. Photographer: Ian Lambot. Image © ERCO, www.erco.com Hongkong and Shanghai Bank Headquarters, Hong Kong, in 2015. Architects: Foster + Partners. Photographer: Simon McCartney. Image © illumination Physics +12

New Images, Video for Bing Thom Architects’ Xiqu Centre Revealed

16:00 - 24 June, 2016
New Images, Video for Bing Thom Architects’ Xiqu Centre Revealed, Courtesy of Bing Thom Architects
Courtesy of Bing Thom Architects

Bing Thom Architects have released new images for Hong Kong’s Xiqu Centre, designed in collaboration with Ronald Lu & Partners. Currently under construction, the building is scheduled for completion in 2017, becoming the first venue to open within the new West Kowloon Cultural District. The Xiqu Centre will serve as the home of the Chinese Opera, as well as play host to an array of cultural events.