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Workplace Design: The Latest Architecture and News

London’s Largest Co-Working Space Set to Open in 2020

London's largest co-working space is officially set to open in the summer of 2020. Designed as part of Victoria House in Bloomsbury Square by LABS Collective, the 150,000 square foot project combines office, retail and leisure space. With access to both the West End and The City, the co-working space will feature a range of rooms and layouts, from small private offices to entire floors.

Courtesy of LABS Collective Courtesy of LABS Collective Courtesy of LABS Collective Courtesy of LABS Collective + 6

Airbnb Environments Principal Designer Rachael Harvey Talks Interior Design and the Future of Workplace

Airbnb is changing the way we experience buildings and cities. Founded in 2008, the digital platform utilizes technology to enable real-world experiences, and in turn, aims to create a world where you can feel at home anywhere. With its own in-house design teams like Samara and Airbnb Environments, the company has begun shaping the future of how we live and work.

Courtesy of Airbnb Courtesy of Airbnb Courtesy of Airbnb Courtesy of Airbnb + 7

Workspace Architecture: 15 Projects from Brasil

This month ArchDaily is exploring the topic of work, demonstrating how businesses can benefit from a good quality space: employee comfort, creativity stimulation, rest areas, brand image improvements, new talents attraction. Inspired by these topics, we selected fifteen contemporary Brazilian projects that illustrate different scales and ways of working to inspire this type of program.

Rios Clementi Hale Studios Address Gentrification Through New L.A. Office

The Los Angeles-based firm, Rios Clementi Hale Studios, a transdisciplinary practice engaging in design from urban planning to product design, opened their new offices in the city's Crenshaw neighborhood. A recent article by Metropolis Magazine outlines the firm's design process in creating their new office layout to emphasize their aspirations as an established practice.

COOKFOX Reimagines Former High Line Freight Terminal as Workplace of the Future

COOKFOX Architects and Oxford Properties have reimagined New York's St. John’s Terminal as a workplace of the future. The 1.3 million square foot proposal aims to connect the Hudson Square neighborhood to the waterfront at the end of The High Line. Combining outdoor space and greenery with 100,000 square-foot floor plates, the project reinterprets the industrial past of the former freight terminal. The project was created to shape how businesses innovate and create between Lower Manhattan and the waterfront.

St. John’s Terminal. Image Courtesy of COOKFOX Architects St. John’s Terminal. Image Courtesy of COOKFOX Architects St. John’s Terminal. Image Courtesy of COOKFOX Architects St. John’s Terminal. Image Courtesy of COOKFOX Architects + 4

"Pixel Facade" System Combines a Love for Nature With Next-Generation Workspaces

Recently shortlisted for the 2018 Design Challenge "Design the Next-Generation Facade" by Metals in Construction Magazine, this "Pixel Facade" system is an adaptive, scalable and repeatable building system that can be applied to various building typologies. The system draws inspiration from our innate desire for nature, also known as "biophilia." The "Pixel Facade" system merges a contemporary office environment with biophilic environments to create the next generation of office design.

Firms Like Zaha Hadid Architects Are Revolutionizing Office Design Using Big Data

This article was originially published by Metropolis Magazine as "Architects, Armed with Data, Are Seeing the Workplace Like Never Before."

A workplace that improves employee productivity and efficiency has been a white whale of corporate managers for decades. But even before the office as we know it today was born, designers and innovators were already studying sites of labor, such as the factory, to devise strategies to boost worker performance. By the 1960s, Robert Propst, the inventor behind Herman Miller’s Action Office line of workplace furniture, and others were conducting workspace research that would ultimately lead to the creation of the modern cubicle.

These developments relied largely on observation and intuition to organize office workers in purportedly effective ways. Now, advances in technology allow designers to take a more sophisticated approach, using sensors, internet-connected furniture and fixtures, and data analytics to study offices in real time. “You can take into account every single employee, and people are very different,” says London architect Uli Blum. “It’s about solving the fundamental problems of getting people the environment they need. And the easiest way is to ask them,” he adds. But finding out the needs of hundreds, sometimes thousands, of workers can quickly become an exercise in futility.

Peek Into This Contemporary Office Environment Through the "Eye" of this New Business Center Facade

The contemporary work environment is evolving. This new office building from Cloud Architects captures the essence of this evolution through multiple green terraces, a large atrium, and elegant materiality. The U219 Business Center in Vilnius, Lithuania, provides 15,000 square meters of rentable area into two horizontal volumes.

Most Architects Prefer Working in Organized Spaces, But Some Opt for "Organized Chaos"

When we say "most" architects, we're basing our conclusion on the responses to our first AD Discussion of 2018. Even though Tim Harford, author of the book Messy, contends that disorder and a bit of confusion can be linked to spaces that inspire more creativity, our readers tend to disagree. In our review of comments on our article, the majority of respondents explained that workspaces with out-of-place objects negatively affected their ability to concentrate. Many responses alluded to their more efficient and prolific results gained by working in an organized space. But that doesn't mean that all ArchDaily readers agreed; there are still ardent defenders of "control chaos" who insist that their best work emerges from working beneath piles of papers or supplies.

OMA Releases New Renderings of their Axel Springer Building in Berlin

OMA has released new images of their design for Axel Springer’s business and digital division, in Berlin, Germany. One of the largest digital publishing houses in Europe, Axel Springer officially launched the project to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the company’s publishing building.

OMA’s proposal was selected in a 2014 international design competition, beating out finalist entries from BIG and Büro Ole Scheeren. The brief called for a new modern work environment to house Axel Springer’s growing business and digital divisions.

Courtesy of OMA Courtesy of OMA Courtesy of OMA Courtesy of OMA + 4

Infographic: The Evolution of the Office

Learn about the evolution of the workplace, from the very first office developed by the De Medici family to today's open collaboration spaces, after the break!

Where You Work: The Offices of ArchDaily Readers

In 2009 we wanted to find out where our readers work and create. We asked, you responded, and the results gave us a fascinating insight into your daily lives. And so, a few weeks ago, we once again asked our readers to send us pictures of their workspaces. We received submissions from all over the world – from beachside desks to a stark warehouse space to a stunning gallery.

Take a look at these creative spaces - you may even recognize your own workplace, or one quite like it - and keep following and participating by using the #wherewework hashtag on Facebook or Twitter. Thanks for your help!

Courtesy of Atelier rzlbd Courtesy of Aparicio Arquitectos Courtesy of Equipoeme Estudio Courtesy of Mackay-Lyons Sweetapple Architects + 30

Where Do You Work? The Offices of ArchDaily Readers

In 2009 we reached out to our readers across the globe and asked "What does your office look like?" From transparent tubes (like Selgas Cano's popular studio) to wide-open spaces (like BIG's offices in Copenhagen), we learned that the projects we publish every day are produced in all kinds of settings. But has anything changed over these few years?

OMA Tops BIG, Büro Ole Scheeren to Design Axel Springer Campus in Berlin

After deliberating over the stellar proposals of three renowned firms, BIG, Büro Ole Scheeren, and OMA, Berlin-based media company AXEL SPRINGER SE has just announced that Rem Koolhaas' design is the winning proposal for their new office building.

The task of the competition was to create additional space for the media company, particularly its digital offers, and thus design a workplace fit for the future of online media. Koolhaas' design, which features a large 30-meter high atrium or "open valley" with interconnected terraces and public workspaces for both individual, collaborative, and mobile work, won favor with the jury for its forward-thinking concept. As Dr. Mathias Döpfner, Chief Executive Officer of Axel Springer SE, commented: “[Koolhaas] presented the conceptually and esthetically most radical model. The fundamental innovation of working environments will support the cultural transformation towards a digital publishing house."

For his part, Koolhaas had this to say: “It is a wonderful occasion to build in Berlin again, on this historical site of all places, for a client who has mobilized architecture to help perform a radical change…a workplace in all its dimensions.”

See more of OMA's winning proposal, after the break...

New Images of the Frank Gehry Facebook Campus Released

After Facebook assumed the former Sun Microsystems complex in Palo Alto in 2011, Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg set out to find an architect capable of handling a grand design for its main main headquarters building. Zuckerberg chose world famous architect Frank Gehry for the job (amid major concessions to the city of Palo Alto).

If he was looking for impact, Zuckerberg could have made no better choice. Gehry's past designs have become renowned tourist attractions, like the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain. They are considered some of the most important works of contemporary architecture on the planet.

Photos of the Gehry model that will become Facebook's new HQ have been floating around for a couple of years. But with the building slated for completion next year, Facebook provided these new, exclusive images to Business Insider of what the world can expect from Gehry's latest design:

The Indicator: Could Architecture Offices Abolish Hierarchy?

What can architecture learn from Zappos? Yes, we’ve all heard about vegan cafés, yoga rooms, playing commando games indoors, and wearing Crocs in the office, but - more importantly - Zappos is transforming office culture in a meaningful, far-reaching way: it’s put an end to staff hierarchy.

According to The Washington Post, Zappos is the largest company to have adopted the Holocracy principle, the brainchild of software entrepreneur-turned-management-guru Brian Roberston. Guru would be the right word because, at first glance, and maybe second or third glance, Holocracy does come off as somewhat of a cult, albeit a business management cult. It creeps me out just a little bit, but having pushed through their website, I feel a little better now, not in the least like I’ve been L. Ron Hubbarded.

In a Holocracy, authority and responsibility are distributed across an organization in a way that is more goal-centered. As they say, “Everyone becomes a leader of their roles and a follower of others.” Still not making any sense? Old hierarchies that rely on “leaders” at the top, “followers” at the bottom, and “managers” in the middle are done away with completely. So, no more “bosses.” No more “staff.” No more “junior designer” or “senior designer.” 

VIDEO: The Endless Table

When designing offices for creative companies, it's important to strike a balance between an efficient workplace, a fun space to be in, and an attention-grabbing signature for the company itself. That's exactly what Clive Wilkinson Architects did for the Barbarian Group, an advertising group in New York for whom they designed the Endless Table, a single desk which both seats all of their 125 staff members, but also defines spaces within the office, such as meeting rooms and cozy work nooks.