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Resilience: The Latest Architecture and News

GLV Gossamer Merge Resilience and Urbanism in Xi'an, China

07:30 - 16 July, 2019
GLV Gossamer Merge Resilience and Urbanism in Xi'an, China, © GVL Gossamer
© GVL Gossamer

GLV Gossamer has released images of their design for a 19 kilometer stretch of waterfront along the Jing River in Xi’an, China. The proposal, a finalist in an international design competition, celebrates the site’s history at the origin of the Silk Road through strategies that tap into ancient and enduring histories of traditional architecture, merchant trade, and agricultural innovation. These enduring histories are woven with contemporary influences such as responses to major climatic and environmental challenges.

© GVL Gossamer © GVL Gossamer © GVL Gossamer © GVL Gossamer + 14

ArchDaily Topics - July: Resilience in Architecture

02:30 - 7 July, 2019
ArchDaily Topics - July: Resilience in Architecture

Resilience has become increasingly common in our vocabulary when we talk about people, buildings, cities or even whole societies overcoming all kind of problems. In fact, Google searches related to resilience have continued to grow since 2004 in English, Spanish, and Portuguese.

3rd International Conference on Amphibious Architecture, Design and Engineering

15:00 - 21 May, 2019
3rd International Conference on Amphibious Architecture, Design and Engineering

The International Conference on Amphibious Architecture, Design and Engineering (ICAADE) 2019 will bring together researchers, practitioners, authorities, students, NGOs, communities, and investors to discuss amphibious construction. Amphibious construction allows otherwise-ordinary structures to temporarily float in-place when flooding occurs.

The Cutting-Edge Materials Science Making Hurricane-Proof Construction Possible

09:30 - 7 December, 2017
The Cutting-Edge Materials Science Making Hurricane-Proof Construction Possible, Perez Art Museum Miami, built with ultra-high-performance concrete, sustained no damage in Hurricane Irma. Image © Iwan Baan
Perez Art Museum Miami, built with ultra-high-performance concrete, sustained no damage in Hurricane Irma. Image © Iwan Baan

This article was originally published on Autodesk's Redshift publication as "Hurricane-Proof Construction Methods Can Prevent the Destruction of Communities."

The four hurricanes that slammed into heavily populated areas from the Caribbean to Texas this summer are inching toward a half-trillion-dollar price tag in damages—to say nothing of the work and wages missed by shutting down entire cities. Buildings are the most visible marker of a place’s resilience after a disaster strikes. Surveying the catastrophic damage forces a difficult question: How can it be rebuilt better?

Student Design Competition: Innovation 2030

19:30 - 31 August, 2017
Student Design Competition: Innovation 2030

Architects play a crucial role in addressing both the causes and effects of climate change through the design of the built environment. Innovative design thinking is key to producing architecture that meets human needs for both function and delight, adapts to climate change projections, continues to support the health and well being of inhabitants despite natural and human-caused disasters, and minimizes contributions to further climate change through greenhouse gas emissions.

reSITE 2017: In/visible City

21:55 - 12 April, 2017
reSITE 2017: In/visible City, reSITE 2017: Iv/isible City. Design © Studio Najbrt
reSITE 2017: Iv/isible City. Design © Studio Najbrt

reSITE brings the 6th annual architecture and urbanism event, reSITE 2017: In/visible City, back to Prague at the Ricardo Bofill-designed Forum Karlin.

How does invisible infrastructure shape the visible aspects of a city?

40 international thought leaders will discuss the intersections of design and infrastructure and the presence of these vital systems in the architecture and landscape of cities.

Resilience by Design Nepal 2016

17:00 - 22 June, 2016
Resilience by Design Nepal 2016, Resilience by Design Nepal 2016 - Reactivating traditional urban settlements through integrated design, planning and building strategies
Resilience by Design Nepal 2016 - Reactivating traditional urban settlements through integrated design, planning and building strategies

Resilience by Design Nepal 2016
Reactivating traditional urban settlements through integrated design, planning and building strategies.

Structures of Coastal Resilience Exhibition Opening

16:09 - 25 January, 2016
Structures of Coastal Resilience Exhibition Opening

Please join us for the opening of Structures of Coastal Resilience: Designing for Climate Change!

The devastation caused by Hurricane Sandy in October of 2012 has highlighted the vulnerability of urban coastal areas to the effects of catastrophic storms and climate change. Coastal communities must adapt planning strategies to mitigate the risk posed by these natural hazards.

Structures of Coastal Resilience (SCR) matches the latest science with urban and landscape design to propose actionable solutions for buffering against storms. Structures of Coastal Resilience (SCR) is a Rockefeller Foundation-supported project dedicated to studying and proposing resilient designs for urban coastal

5 Architectural Secrets of the Badjao: 21st Century Sea People

09:30 - 2 June, 2015
5 Architectural Secrets of the Badjao: 21st Century Sea People, Badjao children practicing rowing. Image © Mohd Khairil Majid via Shutterstock
Badjao children practicing rowing. Image © Mohd Khairil Majid via Shutterstock

Thousands of years ago, a small civilization of hunter gatherers migrated to the coastal regions of Southeast Asia. These people progressed into a widespread tribe of travelling sea dwellers. To this day, they remain a stateless people with no nationality and no consistent infrastructure, sometimes living miles away from land. Yet these people are one of the few civilizations whose collective life practices have survived so long through human history. They are called the Badjao, and they have a surprising amount to teach us about architecture.

Badjao community off the coast of Sabah, Malaysia. Image © Dolly MJ via Shutterstock Badjao woman rowing boat. Image © Dolly MJ via Shutterstock Temporary construction in Southeast Asian ocean. Image © asnida via Shutterstock Badjao child rowing near coast. Image © idome via Shutterstock + 9

NYC's Plan to Mitigate Future Storms

00:00 - 14 June, 2013
NYC's Plan to Mitigate Future Storms, East River Blueway Plan proposed by WXY Studios provides a natural waterfront along the existing and vulnerable FDR in NYC's Lower East Side
East River Blueway Plan proposed by WXY Studios provides a natural waterfront along the existing and vulnerable FDR in NYC's Lower East Side

Immediately after Hurricane Sandy hit the North American Eastern seaboard last October, NYC embarked on a debate on the ways in which the city could be protected from future storms that climate scientists predict will escalate in frequency. Engineers, architects, scientists from myriad disciplines came up with proposals, inspired by international solutions, to apply to this particular application. We were presented ideas of sea walls, floating barrier islands, reefs and wetlands. Diverse in scope, the ideas have gone through the ringer of feasibility. Should we build to defend or build to adapt?

On Tuesday, NYC Mayor Bloomberg announced a plan that includes $20 billion worth of both: a proposal of removable flood walls, levees, gates and other defenses that would be implemented with adaptive measures such as marshes and extensive flood-proofing of homes and hospitals. We have learned over the years that resilience must come with a measure of adaptability if we are to acknowledge that climatic and environmental conditions will continue to challenge the way in which our cities are currently being developed.

What does this plan entail and what can we imagine for the future of NYC? Find out after the break.