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Indiegogo: The Latest Architecture and News

This Compact "Rolling Ruler" Seeks to Change how Architects Measure

09:00 - 12 February, 2019

US-based innovators HOZO Design C.O. have launched an Indiegogo campaign for the “first compact digital rolling ruler.” The “ROLLOVA” seeks to replace traditional measuring tapes with a compact gadget that measures curves and lines. The pocket-sized stainless steel body contains a 10000:1 high-contrast ratio OLED screen, displaying measurements of flat surfaces and curved objects.

With a maximum tolerance of +-0.4%, the rolling device is capable of measuring to a distance of 10 meters (32 feet). When measuring distances between corner to corner, such as window sills, the device’s offset mode adds either the radius or diameter of itself into the measurements, similar to conventional laser measures.

Fundraiser Launched for Giant Burning Man Installation Made from 3000 NASA Space Blankets

12:00 - 30 July, 2018
Fundraiser Launched for Giant Burning Man Installation Made from 3000 NASA Space Blankets, Courtesy of Alex Shtanuk via Indiegogo
Courtesy of Alex Shtanuk via Indiegogo

Moscow-based designer Alex Shtanuk has launched an Indiegogo campaign for his 107,000-square-foot (10,000-square-meter) blanket woven from over 3000 NASA Space blankets, to feature at this year’s Burning Man festival at Black Rock City, Nevada.

“The Blanket” seeks to “bring the waves of the ancient Lake Lahontan back to Playa,” influenced by wind conditions to mirror surreal forms such as waves, mountains, or giant sculptures. With an exterior metallic coating, the blanket will reflect 97% of radiated heat, creating a cool, refreshing environment underneath for those seeking shelter from the hot Playa sun.

Courtesy of Alex Shtanuk via Indiegogo Courtesy of Alex Shtanuk via Indiegogo Courtesy of Alex Shtanuk via Indiegogo Courtesy of Alex Shtanuk via Indiegogo + 8

This 3D Printer, Designed Specifically for Architects, Is Surprisingly Easy to Use

10:15 - 16 October, 2017

Have you ever spent hours calibrating the nozzle of a 3D printer or preparing a print-ready file – only to find that the model has failed because of a missed zero-thickness wall? With this in mind, the Platonics Arka 3D printer currently being developed in Helsinki, Finland—has one simple goal: to remove all unnecessary set-up and technical processes by means of intelligent automation and, as a result, almost entirely eliminate the wasted time that architects and designers spend calibrating printers, or working up print-ready files.

© Platonics © Platonics © Platonics © Platonics + 9

This LEGO-Compatible Tape Will Allow You to Build Structures on Almost Any Surface

12:00 - 15 March, 2017

As any architect who has played with LEGO can tell you (which, let’s face it, is nearly all of us), one of the most exciting yet struggling steps is just starting off on that tabula rasa of the standard, flat LEGO base. But for anyone looking to build something within the context of their environment, you were flat out of luck. Now, that all may be changing, thanks to a new LEGO-compatible tape, currently being funded on Indiegogo.

Socialist Modernism on Your Smartphone: This Research Group is Raising Funds for a Crowdsourcing Mobile App

07:10 - 25 September, 2016
Slovak Radio building, Bratislava, Slovakia. Built 1967-83. Architect: Štefan Svetko, Štefan Ďurkovič, Barnabáš Kissling. Photo by Dumitru Rusu. Image © BACU
Slovak Radio building, Bratislava, Slovakia. Built 1967-83. Architect: Štefan Svetko, Štefan Ďurkovič, Barnabáš Kissling. Photo by Dumitru Rusu. Image © BACU

Recent years have seen a rapidly increasing interest in the architecture of the former Soviet Union. Thanks to the internet, enthusiasts of architectural history are now able to discover unknown buildings on a daily basis, and with the cultural and historical break caused by the collapse of the Soviet Union, each photograph of a neglected and decaying edifice can feel like an undiscovered gem. However, often it can be difficult to find more information about these buildings and to understand their place in the arc of architectural history.

That was the reason behind the creation of Socialist Modernism, a research platform started by BACU - Birou pentru Artă şi Cercetare Urbană (Bureau for Art and Urban Research) which "focuses on those modernist trends from Central and Eastern Europe which are insufficiently explored in the broader context of global architecture." Socialist Modernism already consists of a website on which BACU has cataloged a number of remarkable and little-known buildings. However, now the team is raising funds on Indiegogo's Generosity platform for the next step in their research project. With this money they hope to create an app on which users can add new sites and buildings to the database.

Bus stop in Tajikistan, built in the late 70s. Photo by Dumitru Rusu. Image © BACU 25 May Sportcenter, now the Sportsko rekreativno poslovni centar, Belgrade, Serbia. Built 1973-75. Architect: Ivan Antic. Photo by Dumitru Rusu. Image © BACU Housing complex, Manhattan, Wroclaw, Poland. Built 1968-1973. Architect: Jadwiga Hawrylak-Grabowska. Photo Dumitru Rusu. Image © BACU Public utilities building for telephone and postal services, Cluj-Napoca, Romania. Built 1966-69. Architect: Vasile Mitreaphoto. Photo by Dumitru Rusu. Image © BACU + 43

ArchDaily Readers on the Role of Crowdfunding in Architecture

08:30 - 3 October, 2015
ArchDaily Readers on the Role of Crowdfunding in Architecture, Courtesy of BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group
Courtesy of BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group

Over time, people have found many different ways to fund the construction of a building. Museums for example have long benefited from the support of deep-pocketed patrons, with The Broad Museum, a permanent public home for the renowned contemporary art collection of philanthropists Edythe and Eli Broad, being the newest example in a long history of such practices. However in our ever-more-connected world - and against a backdrop of reduced government support for creative endeavors - the onus of funding seems to be shifting once again, away from the individual and towards the crowd.

As crowdfunding makes strides in all realms of innovative enterprise, including architecture, we wanted to hear from our readers about what they thought of this new opportunity for a publicly held stake in what has historically been the realm of singular, well-heeled organizations in the form of the state or private capital. Writing about the history and current trajectories of public funding, alongside a more pointed discussion of BIG’s Kickstarter for “the world’s first steam ring generator,” we posed the question: does public funding have a place in architecture, and if so, is there a line that should be drawn?

Read on for some of the best replies.

What Role Does Crowdfunding Have in Architecture?

08:00 - 24 August, 2015
What Role Does Crowdfunding Have in Architecture?, The Pedestal at the Statue of Liberty is an early example of an architecture crowdfunding campaign. Image © Flickr CC user Joao Carlos Medau
The Pedestal at the Statue of Liberty is an early example of an architecture crowdfunding campaign. Image © Flickr CC user Joao Carlos Medau

In 1885, with only $3,000 in the bank, the "American Committee" in charge of building a pedestal for the Statue of Liberty ceased work, after both president Grover Cleveland and the US Congress declined to provide funds for the project. The project was saved by a certain Joseph Pulitzer, publisher of the New York World, who used his newspaper to spark a $100,000 fundraising campaign with the promise that everyone who donated would have their name printed the paper.

The base of the Statue of Liberty is perhaps the first ever example of crowdfunding in architecture as we might recognize it today, with a popular media campaign and some form of minor reward. But in recent years, crowdfunding has taken on a whole new complexion. Last week, we asked our readers to tell us their thoughts about a specific example of crowdfunding in architecture: BIG's attempt to raise funds for the prototyping of the steam ring generator on their waste-to-energy plant in Copenhagen. But there are many more examples of fundraising in architecture, and each of them deserves attention.

Crowdfunding Campaign Begins for Homeless Shelter Pods

08:00 - 23 August, 2015
Crowdfunding Campaign Begins for Homeless Shelter Pods, Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of James Furzer
Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of James Furzer

After winning the 6th annual Space for New Visions competition by FAKRO last month, James Furzer of Spatial Design Architects has begun a crowdfunding campaign on Indigogo for his project, “Homes for the Homeless”. The project proposes a series of modular pods which attach to existing buildings, providing a safe space for a night’s rest for the homeless. Extending beyond mere habitation, James Furzer hopes to change the way that the public sees the homeless – of which there are over 750 on any given night in London alone.

Own a Pied-à-Terre in the Heart of Middle Earth with the "Realise Minas Tirith" Campaign

09:30 - 8 August, 2015
Own a Pied-à-Terre in the Heart of Middle Earth with the "Realise Minas Tirith" Campaign, via Indiegogo Realise Minas Tirith Campaign
via Indiegogo Realise Minas Tirith Campaign

Are you looking for the perfect walled city to lay down your roots? Look no further than Minas Tirith, J.R.R. Tolkien's fictional capital of Gondor, located in mountainous and remote Middle Earth. Except, if an ambitious group of British architects get their way, it might not be fictional for much longer. With their plans to construct a replica of Minas Tirith in the non-fictional hills of southern England, the Lord of the Rings-inspired community promises to be a bustling center of activity occupied by the most diehard Middle Earth supporters. This is only possible, of course, if the founders of Realise Minas Tirith are able to fundraise £1.85 Billion ($2.86bn USD) within 60 days on Indiegogo.

Emergency Floor: Help Refugees Worldwide "Get Off the Ground"

08:00 - 25 June, 2015
Emergency Floor: Help Refugees Worldwide "Get Off the Ground", Floor Module in Shelter. Image Courtesy of Emergency Floor
Floor Module in Shelter. Image Courtesy of Emergency Floor

Millions of refugees across the globe, due to global conflict or natural phenomena, are forced to leave their homes and live in low-quality, temporary housing. The majority of these shelters lack a fundamental component of safety and well-being: floors. Emergency Floor is an initiative developed by Sam Brisendine and Scott Key to solve this problem, and bring safety to refugee shelters and the people in them. With their new Indiegogo campaign, Emergency Floor is working to provide efficient, inexpensive flooring that is directly geared towards assisting relief agencies.

Learn more about Emergency Floor after the break.

Underutilized Wood Pallets. Image Courtesy of Emergency Floor Module on Wood Pallet. Image Courtesy of Emergency Floor Floor Module Connection. Image Courtesy of Emergency Floor Unsafe Living Conditions in Refugee Camp. Image Courtesy of Emergency Floor + 11

Help Rebuild a.gor.a Architects' Temporary Dormitories

14:30 - 2 April, 2015
Help Rebuild a.gor.a Architects' Temporary Dormitories, Courtesy of a.gor.a Architects
Courtesy of a.gor.a Architects

Last year on ArchDaily, we featured a.gor.a Architects' Temporary Dormitories in Mae Sot, a series of low-cost shelters that help this town on the Thai border accommodate the influx of Burmese refugees from neighboring Myanmar. But tragically, last month a fire from a nearby sugar cane plantation burned down all four dormitories, negating the generous funding from the Embassy of Luxembourg in Bangkok, preventing the plan to recoup money by recycling the dormitories when they were no longer needed, and of course destroying much-needed accommodation for refugees. To make the most of a bad situation, the architecture firm has turned to Indiegogo in an attempt to raise $5,500 and rebuild at least two of the dormitories. You can visit their Indiegogo page here to help.

The People's Architect: Dutch Residents Pay Tribute by Crowdfunding Future Piet Blom Museum

00:00 - 31 August, 2013
The People's Architect: Dutch Residents Pay Tribute by Crowdfunding Future Piet Blom Museum, Courtesy of Piet Blom Museum
Courtesy of Piet Blom Museum

"Architecture is more than creating a place to live," stated the late Dutch architect, Piet Blom, "you create a society." Till his death in 1999, Blom designed homes and urban schemes as if to reject the stern, coldness of post-war Modernism in light of a warmer, more human architecture. His drawings, diagrams and homes portray an affectionate commitment to reconcile elements of culture with the architecture around us. Characterized by his use of lively colors and equally expressive architectural geometries, project's such as the "Kasbah" and the cube houses in Rotterdam stand as testaments to his belief that architecture serves the people, not the other way around.

A true "People's Architect," Blom's work has endeared a growing number supporters, among these are residents who have lived in his houses and are hoping to garner donations to share these artifacts with the public. Ingeborg van der Aa, secretary of the Piet Blom Foundation, mentions that the initiative's mission is to promote recognition, new insight and appreciation with the hopes of encouraging a younger generation to be active creators of their society.

To learn more or contribute towards the Piet Blom Museum, visit there Indiegogo page here.

Follow us after the break for a rare collection of Blom's drawings.