Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST

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Gigantium Urban Space / JAJA Architects

Gigantium Urban Space / JAJA Architects - Exterior Photography, Recreation & Training, FacadeGigantium Urban Space / JAJA Architects - Exterior Photography, Recreation & Training, FacadeGigantium Urban Space / JAJA Architects - Interior Photography, Recreation & Training, Stairs, FacadeGigantium Urban Space / JAJA Architects - Interior Photography, Recreation & Training, Facade, DoorGigantium Urban Space / JAJA Architects - More Images+ 8

  • Architects: JAJA Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  3500
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2021

Gjuteriet Renovation / Kjellander Sjöberg

Gjuteriet Renovation / Kjellander Sjöberg - Exterior Photography, Cowork Interiors, FacadeGjuteriet Renovation / Kjellander Sjöberg - Exterior Photography, Cowork Interiors, Facade, Arch, ArcadeGjuteriet Renovation / Kjellander Sjöberg - Interior Photography, Cowork Interiors, Stairs, Facade, Handrail, BeamGjuteriet Renovation / Kjellander Sjöberg - Interior Photography, Cowork Interiors, Beam, Facade, HandrailGjuteriet Renovation / Kjellander Sjöberg - More Images+ 25

Feldballe School / Henning Larsen

Feldballe School / Henning Larsen - Exterior Photography, Elementary & Middle School, FacadeFeldballe School / Henning Larsen - Exterior Photography, Elementary & Middle School, Facade, DoorFeldballe School / Henning Larsen - Interior Photography, Elementary & Middle School, Kitchen, Beam, Table, ChairFeldballe School / Henning Larsen - Interior Photography, Elementary & Middle School, Door, Facade, BeamFeldballe School / Henning Larsen - More Images+ 31

Frederiksberg Allé 41 / Cobe

Frederiksberg Allé 41  / Cobe - Exterior Photography, Cultural Center, FacadeFrederiksberg Allé 41  / Cobe - Exterior Photography, Cultural CenterFrederiksberg Allé 41  / Cobe - Exterior Photography, Cultural Center, FacadeFrederiksberg Allé 41  / Cobe - Interior Photography, Cultural CenterFrederiksberg Allé 41  / Cobe - More Images+ 3

  • Architects: Cobe
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  3500
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2021
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers:  Randers Tegl

Sneglehusene Housing / BIG

Sneglehusene Housing / BIG - Exterior Photography, Apartments, Garden, FacadeSneglehusene Housing / BIG - Exterior Photography, Apartments, Facade, Door, BalconySneglehusene Housing / BIG - Exterior Photography, Apartments, Facade, DoorSneglehusene Housing / BIG - Interior Photography, Apartments, Kitchen, Beam, Table, ChairSneglehusene Housing / BIG - More Images+ 20

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  9500
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2022

Villa Kirk / SPOL Architects

Villa Kirk / SPOL Architects - Exterior Photography, Houses, Garden, Facade, ArchVilla Kirk / SPOL Architects - Interior Photography, Houses, Stairs, ArchVilla Kirk / SPOL Architects - Interior Photography, Houses, Stairs, Facade, Handrail, BeamVilla Kirk / SPOL Architects - Exterior Photography, Houses, FacadeVilla Kirk / SPOL Architects - More Images+ 35

Why Use Translucent Polycarbonate on Building Facades?

Whether blending in or standing out, embodying transparency or solidity, expressing coarseness or softness, a façade is the medium through which we engage with architecture. It tells a story and can often set the tone for the rest of the interior. But apart from defining a purely visual experience, a building’s envelope must also be practical, durable and have the ability to properly manage natural lighting and ventilation needs. After all, by being the point of contact with the outside, it is responsible for mitigating sounds and providing protection from climatic conditions, such as wind, rain, heat and humidity. Therefore, when designing a facade, it is important to consider a balance between performance and a beautiful aesthetic. Of course, many materials successfully meet these criteria. But when it comes to creating a comforting, light-filled ambiance while ensuring resistance, ease of installation and versatility, the properties of translucent polycarbonate panels seem to be unparalleled.

What Does the Future Hold for Coastal Cities Following the Aftermaths of Climate Change?

Coastal cities have always been a point of attraction for residents, tourists, and businesses. Alongside the aesthetic features, their proximity to the sea has made these cities a focal point for maritime transportation with the construction of ports, as well as hotspots for recreational and aquacultural activities. However, the past decades saw these particular regions threatened with a shortened lifespan; rising water levels, floods, and recurring cyclones, along with other natural disasters, have endangered coastal communities, putting their population, ecosystem, and built environment at risk. 

What Does the Future Hold for Coastal Cities Following the Aftermaths of Climate Change? - Image 1 of 4What Does the Future Hold for Coastal Cities Following the Aftermaths of Climate Change? - Image 2 of 4What Does the Future Hold for Coastal Cities Following the Aftermaths of Climate Change? - Image 3 of 4What Does the Future Hold for Coastal Cities Following the Aftermaths of Climate Change? - Image 4 of 4What Does the Future Hold for Coastal Cities Following the Aftermaths of Climate Change? - More Images+ 3

H.C.Andersen Hus Museum / Kengo Kuma & Associates

H.C.Andersen Hus Museum / Kengo Kuma & Associates - Exterior Photography, Museum, Facade, DoorH.C.Andersen Hus Museum / Kengo Kuma & Associates - Interior Photography, Museum, Beam, Arch, Table, ChairH.C.Andersen Hus Museum / Kengo Kuma & Associates - Interior Photography, MuseumH.C.Andersen Hus Museum / Kengo Kuma & Associates - Exterior Photography, Museum, Courtyard, Facade, HandrailH.C.Andersen Hus Museum / Kengo Kuma & Associates - More Images+ 17

Odense, Denmark

Coastal Design: The New Waterfront Parks Making Waves

Between rising water levels and global migration to cities, architects and designers need to critically reimagine the relationship between coastal landscapes and public space. Cities are facing entirely new risks and environmental conditions. Resiliency, infrastructure, and ecology are increasingly common terms, reflecting the growing demand to address the spatial and formal challenges faced by cities worldwide. Rethinking boundaries and edges, designers have unique opportunities to help shape public understanding of these conditions through waterfront parks.

Coastal Design: The New Waterfront Parks Making Waves - Image 1 of 4Coastal Design: The New Waterfront Parks Making Waves - Image 2 of 4Coastal Design: The New Waterfront Parks Making Waves - Image 3 of 4Coastal Design: The New Waterfront Parks Making Waves - Image 4 of 4Coastal Design: The New Waterfront Parks Making Waves - More Images+ 7

Thy National Park Visitor Center / LOOP Architects

Thy National Park Visitor Center  / LOOP Architects - Exterior Photography, Park
© Rasmus Hjortshøj, COAST

Thy National Park Visitor Center  / LOOP Architects - Exterior Photography, ParkThy National Park Visitor Center  / LOOP Architects - Exterior Photography, ParkThy National Park Visitor Center  / LOOP Architects - Interior Photography, Park, KitchenThy National Park Visitor Center  / LOOP Architects - Exterior Photography, Park, FacadeThy National Park Visitor Center  / LOOP Architects - More Images+ 18

The Silo / Cobe

The Silo / Cobe - Refurbishment, Facade, BalconyThe Silo / Cobe - Refurbishment, Facade, CityscapeThe Silo / Cobe - Exterior Photography, Refurbishment, Facade, CityscapeThe Silo / Cobe - Exterior Photography, Refurbishment, Facade, StairsThe Silo / Cobe - More Images+ 32

  • Architects: Cobe
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  10000
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers:  &Tradition, Anker & Co, Ideal Work, Randi, Skandinaviska Glassystem, +1

The Author’s House / SLETH architects

The Author’s House / SLETH architects - Exterior Photography, Sustainability, Deck, Facade, Beam, BenchThe Author’s House / SLETH architects - Interior Photography, Sustainability, Bathroom, Stairs, Facade, Beam, HandrailThe Author’s House / SLETH architects - Interior Photography, Sustainability, Deck, Facade, Beam, Door, Column, LightingThe Author’s House / SLETH architects - Interior Photography, Sustainability, Bedroom, Beam, FacadeThe Author’s House / SLETH architects - More Images+ 36

  • Architects: SLETH architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  90
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers:  Dinesen

Endless “Sustainable” Growth is an Oxymoron

This article was originally published on Common Edge

In a Common Edge article, I briefly discussed a concept that I call the “Triple Bottom Lie,” which posits that more people, plus more consumption by each person, plus an economic system completely dependent on the aforementioned items, can just keep working forever, without consequences. Historically, the United States has accepted the economic shibboleth of endless growth because it reduced class conflict; a rising tide (supposedly) lifted all boats, rafts and yachts included. We are, however, approaching the limits of growth, from both a resource standpoint (we’re running out of raw materials) and a technological standpoint (our inventions are progressively less revolutionary).