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Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST

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What Does the Future Hold for Coastal Cities Following the Aftermaths of Climate Change?

Coastal cities have always been a point of attraction for residents, tourists, and businesses. Alongside the aesthetic features, their proximity to the sea has made these cities a focal point for maritime transportation with the construction of ports, as well as hotspots for recreational and aquacultural activities. However, the past decades saw these particular regions threatened with a shortened lifespan; rising water levels, floods, and recurring cyclones, along with other natural disasters, have endangered coastal communities, putting their population, ecosystem, and built environment at risk. 

Aarhus Harbor Bath / BIG. Image © Rasmus Hjortshøj - COASTUNESCO Removes Liverpool’s World Heritage Status. Image Courtesy of Broadway Malyan, © webbaviation.co.ukUrban Requalification of the Colina Sagrada do Senhor do Bonfim / Sotero Arquitetos. Image © Leonardo FinottiChina's Sponge Cities. Image © Turenscape via Euronews+ 8

H.C.Andersen Hus Museum / Kengo Kuma & Associates

© Rasmus Hjortshøj- COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj- COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj- COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj- COAST+ 22

Odense, Denmark

Frederiksberg Allé 41 / Cobe

© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST
© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST

© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST+ 8

  • Architects: Cobe
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  3500
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2021
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Randers Tegl

Coastal Design: The New Waterfront Parks Making Waves

Between rising water levels and global migration to cities, architects and designers need to critically reimagine the relationship between coastal landscapes and public space. Cities are facing entirely new risks and environmental conditions. Resiliency, infrastructure, and ecology are increasingly common terms, reflecting the growing demand to address the spatial and formal challenges faced by cities worldwide. Rethinking boundaries and edges, designers have unique opportunities to help shape public understanding of these conditions through waterfront parks.

© Tianpei Zeng© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Benjamin BenschneiderCourtesy of David Lloyd, SWA+ 12

Thy National Park Visitor Center / LOOP Architects

© Rasmus Hjortshøj, COAST
© Rasmus Hjortshøj, COAST

© Rasmus Hjortshøj, COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj, COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj, COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj, COAST+ 23

Public Waterfront Pools : 10 Aquatics Facilities Bordering Rivers and Oceans

Piscinas en Leça de Palmeira / Alvaro Siza. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
Piscinas en Leça de Palmeira / Alvaro Siza. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

At first glance, building a pool right beside another body of water seems a little redundant. After all, why would someone choose to swim in a pool when they have a river or ocean to enjoy? However, for people with limited mobility and younger more inexperienced swimmers, natural bodies of water can prove both daunting and dangerous. Pools not only provide a controlled, secure space for them to enjoy aquatic activities, they also provide a connection with the surrounding landscape.

On World Bicycle Day: 22 Inspiring Architectural Cycling Projects

Nowadays bicycles are not only used for sports or as a recreational activity, as more and more people are choosing bicycles as their main means of transportation.

Architecture plays a fundamental role in promoting the use of bicycles, as a properly equipped city with safe bicycle lanes, plentiful bicycle parking spots, and open areas to ride freely will encourage people to use their cars much less.

© Russ FlattCourtesy of Sergey Kuznetsov© Iwan Baan© Jesús Granada+ 32

The Silo / Cobe

© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Maria Gonzalez© Maria Gonzalez+ 37

The Author’s House / SLETH architects

© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST+ 41

  • Architects: SLETH architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  90
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Dinesen

Endless “Sustainable” Growth is an Oxymoron

This article was originally published on Common Edge

In a Common Edge article, I briefly discussed a concept that I call the “Triple Bottom Lie,” which posits that more people, plus more consumption by each person, plus an economic system completely dependent on the aforementioned items, can just keep working forever, without consequences. Historically, the United States has accepted the economic shibboleth of endless growth because it reduced class conflict; a rising tide (supposedly) lifted all boats, rafts and yachts included. We are, however, approaching the limits of growth, from both a resource standpoint (we’re running out of raw materials) and a technological standpoint (our inventions are progressively less revolutionary).

Cubic Houses / ADEPT

© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST+ 19

Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Architects: ADEPT
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  125000 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2017
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Randers Tegl, Dalton, Unoform

Fabers Factories / Arcgency

© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST+ 23

  • Architects: Arcgency
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  500
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2020

Braunstein Taphouse / ADEPT

© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST© Rasmus Hjortshøj - COAST+ 42

Køge, Denmark
  • Architects: ADEPT
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  1000
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2020

Vestre Fjord Park / ADEPT

© Rasmus Hjortshøj© Rasmus Hjortshøj© Rasmus Hjortshøj© Rasmus Hjortshøj+ 22

  • Architects: ADEPT
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  2000
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2017