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Namgoong Sun

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OSB Panels in Interiors: From a Humble Material to a Design Feature

From its outer skin to its structural framing system, a building is made out of many layers. Just like a human body, many of those layers – which tend to be the most crucial, functional components – remain unseen by the public, covered with aesthetic features. Among all the hidden elements, all buildings include sheathing, the outer casing that construction crews place to serve several key purposes: protect the floor, walls, roofs and ceilings, fortify the structure against internal and external forces, and cover the entire framework, giving the building a solid shape.

Wood is the most common material for sheathing, with Oriented strand board (OSB) panels usually being the top choice. Why? Made by compressing and gluing cross-oriented strands of wood together with heat-cured adhesives, OSB boards are lightweight, flexible, strong, versatile and fully recyclable. They also stand out by resisting deflection, warping and distortion, apart from offering some thermal and acoustic insulation. However, besides their good performance and mechanical properties, OSB is especially known for being cheaper than other alternatives, drastically saving both costs and time. In fact, this structural panel can be $3 to $5 less expensive than plywood, which explains why it is often considered its low-cost substitute.

Indoor Bleachers: From Offices to Homes

Sede da Unicred / Arquitetura Nacional. Image © Cristiano Bauce
Sede da Unicred / Arquitetura Nacional. Image © Cristiano Bauce

Circulation spaces are often challenging for designers as they are intended—as the name implies—for moving from one room to another. While many take advantage of these areas by using them as storage spaces, Mies van der Rohe at the Farnsworth house reduced circulation to a minimum, creating an open floor plan completely free of hallways. When faced with vertical circulation, the issue is similar. Stairs fulfill the purpose of overcoming the height between one floor and another, but rarely constitute indoor living spaces. Bleachers, in turn, play this role in several projects. Until recently, they were only found in sports spaces or amphitheaters; now the use of bleachers has become widespread and is seen in office spaces, public buildings, schools and even homes.

Imagination Circle / UnSangDong Architects

© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun+ 24

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  140
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2021

Ger House / AtelierJun

© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun+ 23

Kanghwa, South Korea
  • Architects: AtelierJun
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  99
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  AutoDesk, American Standard, LG Hausys, Hansem, Maxwell Render, +2

The Colors of Brick

Morovian Church / 70F Architecture. Image © Luuk KramerHVM House / M2.senos. Image © Ivo TavaresBlack Volcano / Urban Mesh Design. Image © Charles HoseaMaria Montessori Mazatlán School / EPArquitectos + Estudio Macías Peredo. Image © Onnis Luque+ 48

Brick is one of the most popular materials for architects designing with a vintage or rustic aesthetic: exposed brick walls are often touted as highly desirable for apartments, restaurants, and stores, and exterior brick facades can make a building or home feel warmer and more inviting. However, the color and cut of the brick can greatly influence the atmosphere it emanates, with white brick lending itself to more minimalist design and tan brick tending to feel more rustic and earthy. In this article, we will explore some of the most popular brick colors, ways to artificially color brick, and recent projects that use brick facades or interior brick elements effectively.

Old brick house / AtelierJun

© Namgoong Sun
© Namgoong Sun

© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun+ 29

Yeongdeungpo-gu, South Korea
  • Architects: AtelierJun
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  461
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2015
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  AutoDesk, American Standard, thyssenkrupp, D&Y, Hansem, +3
  • Professionals : Lims

Pino Familia / Moon Hoon

© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun+ 40

  • Architects: Moon Hoon
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  478
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2016

Bracing House / Atelier Jun

© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun+ 24

Yangcheon-gu, South Korea
  • Architects: Atelier Jun
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  646
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2015
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  American Standard, thyssenkrupp, D&Y, Hansem, Inoblock
  • Professionals : S&B

Two Moon / Moon Hoon

© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun+ 41

Ananti Penthouse Seoul / Ken Min Architects

© Ananti© Namgoong Sun© Shin Kyungsub© Ananti+ 25

Morse_d curve / Moon Hoon

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  • Architects: Moon Hoon
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  471
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  KCC, Eagon, HANGLAS, Hanhwa L&C, Luxteel

Erum Church / Lee Eunseok + Atelier KOMA

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Yongin-si, South Korea

Heavenly Gem Church / Lee Eunseok + Atelier KOMA

© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun+ 26

Dominique Perrault and Students Envision Underground Solutions for an Underused Gallery at the 2017 Seoul Biennale

Currently on display outside the Zaha Hadid-designed Dongdaemum Design Plaza as part of the 2017 Seoul Biennale, the Groundscape eXPerience Pavilion is a 30-meter-long steel grid structure featuring a sequence of 28 experiments of underground architecture by 60 university students from Swiss Institute of Technology (EPFL) and EWHA Women's University (Seoul, South Korea).

Led by professor Dominique Perrault, the installation is a scale model of the 2.7 kilometer Seoul city central Euljiro underground gallery, an underutilized market space in the city center. The 28 “urban fossils” explore possibilities for the revitalization of the gallery, reimagining the structure as an urban link that is part of a larger “network of urban substance and material.”

© Dominique Perrault SUBLABEPFL x EWHA© Dominique Perrault SUBLABEPFL x EWHA© Namgoong Sun© Dominique Perrault SUBLABEPFL x EWHA+ 23

Butterfly House / HH Architects

© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun+ 17

Yongin-si, South Korea

Parnas Tower / Chang-jo Architects

© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun© Namgoong Sun+ 35

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  219
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2016
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Alto, LG Hausys, Haewon MSC, Hankuk BM

12 Dynamic Buildings in South Korea Pushing the Brick Envelope

Bricks are as old as the hills. An enduring element of architectural construction, brick has been a material of choice as far back as 7000BC. Through the centuries, bricks have built ancient empires in Turkey, Egypt, Rome and Greece. Exposed stock brick came to define the Georgian era, with thousands of red brick terraces still lining the streets of cities such as London, Edinburgh and Dublin.

Today, brick is experiencing a Renaissance. Architectural landmarks across the world such as Frank Gehry’s Dr Chau Chak Wing Building in Sydney and the Tate Modern Switch House by Herzog & de Meuron are pushing the proverbial brick envelope, redefining how the material can be used and perceived.

South Korea presents an interesting case for the changing face of brick, with a preference for dark, grey masonry striking a heavy, brutalist, yet playful tone. Like many countries, South Korean brick architecture has questioned conformity, experimenting with stepped, perforated, permeable facades, and dynamic, curved, flowing walls. Below, we have rounded up 12 of their most interesting results.

Trio House / AXIS Architects

© Sun Namgoong© Sun Namgoong© Sun Namgoong© Sun Namgoong+ 13

Yongin-si, South Korea