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Hiroyuki Oki

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F-Coffee / Wangstudio

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 14

tp. Đồng Hới, Vietnam
  • Architects: Wangstudio
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 217.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2014

Walk-in Showers Without Doors or Curtains: Design Tips and Examples

Because it doesn't include a bathtub, or require doors, screens, or curtains, the walk-in shower often makes bathrooms appear larger, cleaner, and more minimalist. 

However, some precautions must be taken when designing them. Most importantly, the shower cannot be left completely open, even if it appears to be at first glance. Most designs incorporate a tempered glass that prevents water from "bouncing" out of the shower space, subtly closing the area. When this transparent division doesn't have a frame, the appearance of fungi due to accumulation of water and moisture becomes less likely.

Casa de monte / TACO taller de arquitectura contextual. Image © Leo Espinosa Fagerstrom House / Claesson Koivisto Rune. Image © Åke E:son Lindman AUTOHAUS / Matt Fajkus Architecture. Image © Charles Davis Smith Pombal / AZO. Sequeira Arquitectos Associados. Image © Nelson Garrido + 28

Timber House / MM++ architects

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 33

Ciudad Ho Chi Minh (Saigón), Vietnam
  • Architects: MM++ architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 300.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018

Which Are The Most Used Materials in Social Housing?

Choice of building materials and the inherent continuous reflection about the reach and capabilities of architecture are an interesting alternative way to approach this issue. The materials used in social housing should address local and economic possibilities and the real needs for access to housing in the contemporary context.

In this article, we analyze different projects published on our site to identify some of the predominant materials used in social housing, both for the formation of structures or enclosures. The intentions of this are two-fold: firstly, to create a worldwide panorama of different case studies with different construction styles from a range of geographical locations, and secondly, to provide inspiration and tools to architects to make better social housing.

Below we present 15 social housing projects and their diverse materials and construction styles.

Green Peace Village / Ho Khue Architects

© Hiroyuki Oki
© Hiroyuki Oki

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 24

  • Architects: Ho Khue Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 815.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

Villa T House / Time Architects

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 26

Ciudad Ho Chi Minh (Saigón), Vietnam
  • Architects: Time Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 350.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

School and Daycare Projects for Different Climates

European children spend approximately 200 days a year at primary school. Even though the academic year in most parts of the world is not as long as in Europe, the place where children and adolescents spend the most time, following their own homes, is usually in educational institutions. These can be places for learning, playing and socializing, and as sad as it may be, they can also be safer places for children living in environments of abandonment, hunger, and violence, providing them with opportunities and even meals. A United Kingdom-wide survey found that the differences in physical characteristics of classrooms accounted for 16% of the variations in learning progress over the course of a year. In other words, the better a classroom is designed, the better children perform academically. According to the study, the factors that most affect children are sunlight, indoor air quality, acoustic environment, temperature, the design of the classroom itself and the stimulation within it.

The Nest / a21 studio

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 25

  • Architects: a21studio
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 40.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2013

Lien Thong House / 6717 Studio

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 35

An Phu, Vietnam
  • Architects: 6717 Studio
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 84.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018

D9 House / Group A architects

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 31

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Thuy Vien Coffee Shop / G+ Architects

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 29

Mỹ Tho, Vietnam
  • Architects: G+ Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 1280.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2017

House for Trees / VTN Architects

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 19

Tan Binh District, Vietnam
  • Architects: VTN Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 226.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2014

Viettel Academy Educational Center / VTN Architects

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 34

  • Architects: VTN Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 2651.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

Pattern House / MM++ architects

© Hiroyuki OKI
© Hiroyuki OKI

© Hiroyuki OKI © Hiroyuki OKI © Hiroyuki OKI © Hiroyuki OKI + 24

Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
  • Architects: MM++ architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 230.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

NGA House / Sanuki Daisuke architects

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 37

Ha House / VTN Architects

© Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki © Hiroyuki Oki + 29

Ho Chi Minh (Saigon), Vietnam
  • Architects: VTN Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 137.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

30 Plans, Sections and Details for Sustainable Projects

The dramatic improvement in recent decades in our understanding of sustainable design has shown that designing sustainably doesn't have to be a compromise—it can instead be a benefit. When done correctly, sustainable design results in higher-performing, healthier buildings which contribute to their inhabitants' physical and mental well-being.

The benefits of incorporating vegetation in façades and in roofs, as well as materials and construction systems that take energy use and pollution into account, demonstrate that sustainable design has the potential to create buildings that improve living conditions and respect the natural environment.

Below we have compiled 30 plans, sections and construction details of projects that stand out for their approach to sustainability.