All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

Derek Swalwell

BROWSE ALL FROM THIS PHOTOGRAPHER HERE

Concrete House / Matt Gibson Architecture

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell + 25

Melbourne, Australia

Best Houses of 2019

© Quang Tran © Simon Wilson with Amelia Holmes © Peter Eckert © Shigeo Ogawa + 51

More than 5.000 architecture projects were published in ArchDaily this year.  Year after year, we curate hundreds of residential projects, and as we know our readers love houses, we compiled a selection of the most visited residential projects published on the site. 

Set in various locations around the world, in urban, rural, mountain and beach landscapes; a variety of structural designs, from traditional masonry to the most technological prefabricated systems; from small dwellings to large houses and materials such as concrete, wood, and bricks as the most used. We also found their design and typology solutions were very much aligned with their specific settings and all of them share a strong dialogue between the house and nature, whether it is its direct surroundings or the introduction of green into a more condensed urban setting. 

This selection of 50 houses highlights the most visited examples during these twelve months and, according to our readers, were the most attractive in innovation, construction techniques, and design challenges. Check them out below:

Viewing Back House / HYLA Architects

© Derek Swalwell
© Derek Swalwell

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell + 27

  • Architects: HYLA Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 567.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

Verdant Verandahs House / HYLA Architects

© Derek Swalwell
© Derek Swalwell

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell + 18

  • Architects: HYLA Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 549.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

York St. House / Jackson Clements Burrows Architects

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell + 15

St Kilda, Australia

Concrete Light House / HYLA Architects

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell + 22

  • Architects: HYLA Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 491.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018

Oak House / Kennedy Nolan

© Derek Swalwell
© Derek Swalwell

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell + 21

Melbourne, Australia
  • Architects: Kennedy Nolan
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 354.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

Fitzroy Lane House / Kennedy Nolan

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell + 17

Fitzroy, Australia
  • Architects: Kennedy Nolan
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 305.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018

Point Nepean Residence / B.E Architecture

© Derek Swalwell
© Derek Swalwell

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell + 17

Portsea, Australia
  • Architects: B.E Architecture
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 455.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018

Terrazzo is Back: Production, Installation, and Samples in Architecture

Focal Length / RENESA Architecture Design Interiors Studio. Image © Suryan//Dang
Focal Length / RENESA Architecture Design Interiors Studio. Image © Suryan//Dang

Terrazzo is made by combining a cement base (sand, water, and cement) with a mixture of ground minerals - like marble, granite, and quartz - and can be applied to almost any surface, vertical or horizontal. The technique, produced using a completely hand-crafted method, was used worldwide in the construction of modern buildings and is noted for its durability, resistance (to water and abrasion), and easy maintenance. This made it a go-to material in the creation of flooring for houses and the common areas of residential and office buildings.  

Today, terrazzo is experiencing a revival as one of the key trends in contemporary architecture. Here, we will discuss the whats and hows of terrazzo and illustrate some of its uses in current projects. 

Focal Length / RENESA Architecture Design Interiors Studio. Image © Suryan//Dang Casa Salmen / Office S&M. Image © French + Tye Apartamento Copan / Sabiá Arquitetos. Image © Pedro Vannucchi Parisienne / Miriam Barrio Estudio. Image © Maria Pujol + 24

Ascot Veil House / Wolveridge Architects

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell + 59

Ascot Vale, Australia
  • Architects: Wolveridge Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 242.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2019

His & Her House / FMD Architects

© Derek Swalwell
© Derek Swalwell

© Peter Bennetts © Derek Swalwell © Peter Bennetts © Peter Bennetts + 23

Melbourne, Australia
  • Architects: FMD Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area: 158.0
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year: 2018

Resort House / Martin Friedrich Architects

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell + 28

Brighton, Australia

Béton Brut Bathrooms: The Beauty of Concrete in Intimate Spaces

© Peter Clarke Photography © BoysPlayNice © Relja Ivanic © Takumi Ota + 31

Why use concrete in bathrooms?

Béton brut or "raw concrete" is a naturally porous material that provides many advantages for the design and build of a bathroom. As a waterproof and pressure-resistant material, it is easy to clean, doesn't deteriorate, prevents bathroom fungus and is low maintenance. Attractive as it is functional, concrete is versatile for both on-site furniture and wall coatings, floors and even shower trays. In addition, due to its thermal mass, concrete is an excellent material for floor heating.

Pro Tip: There are a variety of concrete finishes, but for the safety of daily bathroom users, you must add a surface sealer and a certain percentage of traction to avoid slippage.

Below, we've compiled 26 concrete bathrooms that find intimacy in béton brut.

This collection is one of many interesting content groupings made by our registered users. Remember you can save and manage what inspires you on ArchDaily account. Create yours here.

Fifty Fifty House / Architecture Architecture

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell + 23

Murrumbeena, Australia

Grant House / Austin Maynard Architects

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell + 63

Fitzroy North, Australia

Ancona House / Steve Domoney Architecture

© Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell © Derek Swalwell + 59

Ancona, Australia