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Romullo Baratto

Romullo Baratto is an architect and urban planner, with a Masters in architecture and cinema from FAU-USP. Apart from ArchDaily, he also works as an independent photographer and filmmaker at studio Flagrante trying to explore the relations between movement and space through images. He was part of the curatorial team for the 11th São Paulo Architecture Biennial in 2017.

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Social Inequality, As Seen From The Sky

08:00 - 12 August, 2018
Social Inequality, As Seen From The Sky, Kya Sands, Johannesburg, South Africa. Image © Johnny Miller / Unequal Scenes
Kya Sands, Johannesburg, South Africa. Image © Johnny Miller / Unequal Scenes

Across the world, urban clusters have -- to a greater or lesser extent -- social and economic differences. Reflected in space, these imbalances of income and access to education, health, sanitation, and infrastructure generate ruptures more or less visible - although drastically felt.

Although a daily reality for some, socio-spatial inequalities can often go unnoticed. Photographer Johnny Miller states, "Discrepancies in how people live are sometimes hard to see from the ground... Oftentimes, communities of extreme wealth and privilege will exist just meters from squalid conditions and shack dwellings." Miller's photo series 'Unequal Scenes' seeks "to portray the most 'Unequal Scenes' in [the world] as objectively as possible."

The Cartographies of the Brazilian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2018

18:00 - 30 July, 2018
The Cartographies of the Brazilian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2018, © Imagen Subliminal
© Imagen Subliminal

The concept and title Walls of Air was conceived as a response to the theme of Freespace proposed by curators Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara in order to provoke questions about: 1. the different sorts of walls that construct, on multiple scales, the Brazilian territory; 2. the borders of architecture itself in relation to other disciplines.

Therefore, a reflection began on how much Brazilian architecture and its urban developments are, in fact, free. Without the ambition of reaching an answer, but hoping to open the conversation to a large and diverse public, we chose to shed light on processes that often go unnoticed due to their nature or scale. The immaterial barriers built between people or neighborhoods, and the processes of urbanization in Brazil on a continental scale are examples of questions we considered.

© Imagen Subliminal © Imagen Subliminal © Imagen Subliminal © Riccardo Tosetto / Fundação Bienal + 43

The Capela do Monte Through the Lens of João Morgado

06:00 - 5 July, 2018
The Capela do Monte Through the Lens of João Morgado, © João Morgado
© João Morgado

Portuguese architectural photographer João Morgado shared with us a series of images from Álvaro Siza's latest project, the Capela do Monte. This chapel is located in Barão de São João, in the Algarve region of Portugal. Part of the Monte da Charneca complex, Capela do Monte was commissioned in 2016 by a Swiss-American couple residing there.

Inaugurated in March of this year, the sandy colored, 10.34 x 6.34-meter structure was built at the highest point of a hill and can only be accessed by foot. Its monolithic geometry suggests, from outside, a serenity from the inner space. The wooden furniture within the chapel were all designed by Siza and manufactured by Serafim Pereira Simões Successors of Porto.

Brazilian Artist Ernesto Neto Creates Giant Installation in Zurich's Central Station

16:00 - 2 July, 2018
Brazilian Artist Ernesto Neto Creates Giant Installation in Zurich's Central Station, ERNESTO NETO, GAIAMOTHERTREE, 2018, Zurich Main Station, Fondation Beyeler. Image © Mark Niedermann
ERNESTO NETO, GAIAMOTHERTREE, 2018, Zurich Main Station, Fondation Beyeler. Image © Mark Niedermann

Brazilian contemporary artist Ernesto Neto recently realized a colorful sculpture made of hand-knotted cotton strips in the atrium of Zurich's Central Station. Titled Gaia Mother Tree, the installation resembles a giant tree and extends from the station's roof to its floor.

Exhibited by the Fondation Beyeler, Neto's sculpture is an immersive work of art, a space that one can enter into and walk around or remain and meditate.  The Gaia Mother Tree will be on display until July 29th. A series of activities for adults and children, including musical concerts, workshops and debates, is scheduled to take place under the net of cotton.

Adobe Recreates Lost Typography from the Masters of the Bauhaus

06:00 - 22 June, 2018
Adobe Recreates Lost Typography from the Masters of the Bauhaus, Bauhaus Dessau. Image © Nate Robert via Flickr Licença CC BY-SA 2.0
Bauhaus Dessau. Image © Nate Robert via Flickr Licença CC BY-SA 2.0

The idea of a total work of art - Gesamtkunstwerk - guided several schools and movements in the 19th century, including the Bauhaus, which brought the term into the modern era. With the school's unstructured architecture and avant-garde furniture design came new ways of designing clothing, graphics and painting, etc. In the Bauhaus different fields influenced each other, diluting the border between art and industry as they evolved together. When the school was closed 1933 many projects were left unfinished.

In order to revive some of the work begun at the Bauhaus, Adobe launched the Hidden Treasures project to revive five fonts inspired by the original designs of five of the school's masters: Joost Schmidt, Xanti Schawinsky, Reinhold Rossig, Carl Marx and Alfred Arndt.

SUMMARY Presents a Concrete Installation at the 2016 Venice Biennale

14:30 - 7 June, 2018

Text description from the architects. At the 15th edition of the Venice Biennale, Alejandro Aravena invited us to look at new fields of action, projects that intend to improve life quality and stories of success that are worth getting to know. Thus, Samuel Gonçalves, founder of the SUMMARY studio, the youngest studio invited, was selected to present his work “infrastructure-structure-architecture” with the purpose of showing the concept behind his project Gomos System.

Carla Juaçaba Presents Her Chapel Design for the Vatican at the 2018 Venice Biennale

06:00 - 25 May, 2018
Carla Juaçaba Presents Her Chapel Design for the Vatican at the 2018 Venice Biennale , View of the Chapel. Image © Carla Juaçaba
View of the Chapel. Image © Carla Juaçaba

Selected along with nine other architects by the VaticanCarla Juaçaba has shared images of her proposed chapel design as part of the Venice Architecture Biennial, which marks the city-state's first time participating in the largest architectural event in the world.

The proposed chapel design seeks a harmonious integration between the water and trees that surround Venice, with the nearby vegetation outlining the interior space of the chapel. The space between the treetops - which offers a view of the sky - functions as the ceiling of the chapel.

Celebrate International Museum Day With These Exceptional Museum Designs

00:00 - 18 May, 2018
Celebrate International Museum Day With These Exceptional Museum Designs

Not all architects get the opportunity to design a museum. Between budget, scale and factors external to the field of architecture, designing a museum--and actually getting it built-- may mark the pinnacle of one's professional trajectory.

These public buildings provide an invaluable service to the communities in which they are located; from education to commemoration and (occasionally) the provision of public space, museums are "shining lights" in which architecture plays a fundamental role. 

Portugal Announces the 12 Projects That Will be Part of Its Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2018

06:00 - 6 May, 2018
Portugal Announces the 12 Projects That Will be Part of Its Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2018, Arquipélago – Contemporary Arts Centre / João Mendes Ribeiro + Menos é Mais Arquitectos © José Campos
Arquipélago – Contemporary Arts Centre / João Mendes Ribeiro + Menos é Mais Arquitectos © José Campos

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage we present Public Without Rhetoric the proposal for the Portuguese Pavilion. Below, curators Nuno Brandão Costa and Sérgio Mah describe their contribution in their own words.

Public Without Rhetoric is the project selected to represent Portugal at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia. The curators Nuno Brandão Costa and Sérgio Mah propose a tour of the “Public Building” of Portuguese origin through 12 works created at a time when Western Europe is confronted with its limits and possibilities and as architecture manifests its nonconformist nature in reinforcing its role in political and social intervention.

Apparently, All Roads Do Lead to Rome

08:00 - 5 May, 2018
Apparently, All Roads Do Lead to Rome, via Roads to Rome
via Roads to Rome

The well-known saying “all roads lead to Rome” seems to be true--at least, that’s what Moovel Lab, a team from Stuttgart dedicated to urban mobility research, points out. Titled "Roads to Rome," the project has mapped out over-land routes across Europe that converge to the city. 

From a grid of 26,503,452 square kilometers covering all of Europe, the researchers defined 486,713 starting points that were superimposed on the continent's street map. Then an algorithm was developed for the project that calculated the shortest route between each of the points and the Italian capital. 

Mobile App Turns "Monotonous" Modernist Housing Blocks into a Game of Tetris

08:00 - 29 April, 2018
Mobile App Turns "Monotonous" Modernist Housing Blocks into a Game of Tetris, © Lukas Valiauga​
© Lukas Valiauga​

Modern architecture has had many faces and developments, ranging from post-war reconstruction strategies in Europe to the International Style in the United States. One of these facets - perhaps the least glorious - are the social housing buildings of the eastern part of Europe, the results of initiatives by the Soviet regime to offer low-cost housing to the population. 

Often associated with unsuccessful programs, these buildings were generally very similar to each other, presenting very simple prismatic geometries with little chromatic variation. Blocks, so to speak, that in the hands and imagination of designer Lukas Valiauga take on a ludic aspect that has never been natural to them. 

Collages of Iconic Architecture Transformed Into Everyday Objects

08:00 - 22 April, 2018
Collages of Iconic Architecture Transformed Into Everyday Objects, © Filipe Vasconcelos
© Filipe Vasconcelos

It's not uncommon to happen upon works of architecture that resemble everyday objects. Sou Fujimoto even created an entire exhibition of "architecture" made of ashtrays, potato chips and matchboxes. Cheese graters, beehives and bottle openers appear to have been enlarged and given an architectural program (given the resemblance to their smaller counterparts). 

Architect Filipe Vasconcelos goes beyond obvious alikeness and explores, through digital collage, the similarity between architectures and objects. He creates scenes in which the works are reimagined in displaced situations, with nothing to do with original context or use.

Tishk Barzanji's Illustrations Envision Complex Universes Inspired By Surrealism And Modern Architecture

08:00 - 21 April, 2018
Tishk Barzanji's Illustrations Envision Complex Universes Inspired By Surrealism And Modern Architecture, © Tishk Barzanji
© Tishk Barzanji

It is rare to find artists who can instigate critical reflection on architecture by combining references such as 'The Red Wall' (La Muralla Roja) by Ricardo Boffil, with the complex illustrations of Giovanni Battista Piranesi and pop culture icons. But Tishk Barzanji, a London artist, is one who does.

Through his digital illustrations, he explores elements of modern architecture from a filtered view by using references that create a dreamlike and surreal universe, producing compositions that express an austere and somewhat disturbing atmosphere.

In Celebration of Our 10th Anniversary: 10 Buildings That Bring to Mind the AD Logo

08:00 - 17 April, 2018
In Celebration of Our 10th Anniversary: 10 Buildings That Bring to Mind the AD Logo

This year, ArchDaily marks our 10th anniversary as a global platform for architecture. In the past 10 years, we have democratized access to architecture and brought a daily dose of information, knowledge and inspiration to students and professionals.

To celebrate this important milestone, we have compiled a series of projects that recall our iconic logo: the blue three-story, prismatic house. We've curated over 33,543 built projects so far, including classics and flashbacks. We went through this enormous archive of projects and made a note of the ones that amused us and delighted us with their rectangular prism shapes and oddly occurring windows. They remind us of the beloved ArchDaily logo, and we're pleased to see that this shape can take on so many forms, all over the world. 

Bataan Chapel by Swiss Artist Not Vital Questions the Boundaries Between Art and Architecture

07:45 - 8 April, 2018
Bataan Chapel by Swiss Artist Not Vital Questions the Boundaries Between Art and Architecture, Interior of the Chapel, lit by the opening above "The Last Supper." Image © Eric Gregory Powell
Interior of the Chapel, lit by the opening above "The Last Supper." Image © Eric Gregory Powell

Art, in general, is produced to be seen or experienced by another, an interlocutor, who, in turn, establishes various relationships with the work. However, this does not appear to be the case with the Bataan Chapel, built by the Swiss artist Not Vital in the Philippines.

Punished by constant winds, the work rises on a hill in rural Bagac, a town of just under 30,000 inhabitants located about 50 kilometers west of Manilla. The remote location of the installation makes it difficult to access and makes the journey a task that takes on the air of pilgrimage—part of its grace lies precisely in its inaccessibility.

50 Housing Floor Plans: A Deck of Flashcards Featuring Desirable Collective Housing

22:00 - 24 March, 2018
50 Housing Floor Plans: A Deck of Flashcards Featuring Desirable Collective Housing, Courtesy of a+t architecture publishers
Courtesy of a+t architecture publishers

Following up on their series of urban block flashcards, Spanish publisher a+t architecture publishers recently launched a new deck of cards featuring architecture that "promote[s] the compact city and the desirable dwelling." Titled  50 Housing Floor Plans, this new version contains examples of recent collective living projects, featuring buildings constructed between 2000 and 20017. 

From Digital to Reality: A Comparison of FALA Atelier's Collages to the Actual Buildings

16:00 - 25 February, 2018

To avoid hyperrealistic renderings we have witnessed the emergence of other options for architectural representation which seduce the viewer, not for their overwhelming resemblance to reality but rather the opposite, its resemblance to everyday life's textures presented through unpretentious drawings inspired by collage, watercolor, and painting. Digital collage and other similar representation tools have gained more popularity when discussing how architecture can be communicated. 

12 Women in Architecture Photography (Part 2)

08:00 - 20 February, 2018
12 Women in Architecture Photography (Part 2), © Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

Is there an aspect, a recurring mark, that reveals a difference in the way that male and female architecture photographers see the world? This is, perhaps, one of those rhetorical questions often used as an argument to shed light on works produced by women and for which there is no precise answer.

Without claiming to offer an answer to this question—and in order to follow up on our first article that showcased a selection of women in architecture photography—we present here a new compilation of professionals who deserve attention for the quality of their photographic work. See our list below: