MIT Announce Ten Associated Installations at 2016 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 2 May, 2016
MIT Announce Ten Associated Installations at 2016 Venice Biennale, The Foodmet Market houses a wide variety of uses, including; meat industries, indoor markets, rooftop farms, retail and parking. The building applies the use of the platonic panels as the first architectural step towards the realization of the district wide masterplan which envisions the conversion of an industrial slaughterhouse to a mixed urban environment. Foodmet Abbatoir, Brussels (2016). Image © Filip Dujardin
The Foodmet Market houses a wide variety of uses, including; meat industries, indoor markets, rooftop farms, retail and parking. The building applies the use of the platonic panels as the first architectural step towards the realization of the district wide masterplan which envisions the conversion of an industrial slaughterhouse to a mixed urban environment. Foodmet Abbatoir, Brussels (2016). Image © Filip Dujardin

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have announced that eight full-time or visiting faculty members and four alumni spanning five continents will be responsible for ten separate installations at the upcoming 2016 Venice Biennale. The institution have said that their "worldview for meaningful impact [is] deeply aligned with this year’s theme of architecture in action."

Twin Creeks Linear Park Design Competition

03:45 - 29 April, 2016
Twin Creeks Linear Park Design Competition

The City of Kansas City is sponsoring a design competition to bring in new ideas, energy, and visions to the development of Twin Creeks. Individual and multi-disciplinary design teams from across the United States and beyond are invited to develop an inspiring design vision for a new linear park.

Cloud Urbanism: Towards a Redistribution of Spatial Value

04:00 - 21 March, 2016
Cloud Urbanism: Towards a Redistribution of Spatial Value, A billboard advertisement for Manhattan Mini-Storage. The green background and mention of “the cloud” is a direct reference to MakeSpace. Image via Business Insider, MakeSpace
A billboard advertisement for Manhattan Mini-Storage. The green background and mention of “the cloud” is a direct reference to MakeSpace. Image via Business Insider, MakeSpace

Volume Magazine in advance of their 47th issue, The System*.

Two recent trends have recently emerged from the United States’ real estate market that pick up on societal transformations in the way architecture and the city is inhabited. If synchronized, they stand to alter the principles under-riding contemporary logics of urban development. They do so by embodying an alternative system of values, framing its spatial articulation as a critical design project. The purpose of this short text is to present the two trends next to one another, evaluate the prospects of their synchronization, and speculate toward the future they potentiate in unison.

Open Call: Santa Monica LAGI 2016: Powering Places in Southern California

14:31 - 4 March, 2016
Open Call: Santa Monica LAGI 2016: Powering Places in Southern California

The Land Art Generator Initiative is delighted to announce that LAGI 2016 will be held in Southern California, with the City of Santa Monica as site partner. This free and open call ideas competition invites individuals or interdisciplinary teams to design a large-scale site-specific work of public art that also serves as clean energy and/or drinking water infrastructure for the City of Santa Monica.

The complete Design Guidelines along with CAD files, photos, and more will be available on January 1, 2016 at http://landartgenerator.org/designcomp

The design site includes the breakwater adjacent to the historic Santa Monica Pier and offers the opportunity to

Exhibition at Chicago's Graham Foundation to Examine African Modernism

07:00 - 21 January, 2016
Exhibition at Chicago's Graham Foundation to Examine African Modernism,  Rinaldo Olivieri, La Pyramide, 1973, Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire). Image © Iwan Baan
Rinaldo Olivieri, La Pyramide, 1973, Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire). Image © Iwan Baan

new exhibition opening later this month at Chicago's Graham Foundation seeks to explore the complex history and legacy of modernist architecture in sub-Saharan Africa during the 1960s and 1970s. Architecture of Independence: African Modernism will feature nearly eighty buildings in commissioned photographs by Iwan Baan, Alexia Webster, and Manuel Herz. Alongside archival material, the exhibition "imparts a new perspective on the intersection of architecture and nation-building in Ghana, Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire, Kenya, and Zambia and investigates some of the most compelling yet under-studied examples of 1960s and 1970s architecture worldwide."

Breaking Ground: Steven Holl Architects Celebrates 8 Projects Currently Under Construction

11:30 - 19 October, 2015
Breaking Ground: Steven Holl Architects Celebrates 8 Projects Currently Under Construction, Visual Arts Building, University of Iowa. Image © Chris McVoy
Visual Arts Building, University of Iowa. Image © Chris McVoy

It is no secret that, in the last 10 years, a majority of the big budget construction projects have been centered in newly emerging world markets like China. But now, the markets may be turning. Steven Holl Architects is a strong example of this trend: with the groundbreaking of the Glassell School of Art in Houston on the 15th, the firm now has 8 projects under construction in the western world - 7 in the United States, and one in the United Kingdom. Owing to the steady strengthening of the US dollar over recent years, clients seem to be investing in high ticket architecture once again. After completing projects abroad such as the Sliced Porosity Block in Chengdu, and Nanjing’s Sifang Art Museum, Holl will now be working in cities like Richmond, Iowa City, New York and London.

Holl’s recent work also reflects a change in design scale. In projects such as the Linked Hybrid in Beijing and the Vanke Center/Horizontal Skyscraper in Shenzhen, design began at the urban level, resulting in inward-looking superstructures. In the firm’s return to the west, projects are usually designed as an object or extension of an existing environment, such as in their expansion project for the Kennedy Center. The reduced sense of scale is also evident in the square-footage in some of their recent designs, including a residence to be built at under 1000 square feet.

Visual Arts Building, University of Iowa. Image © Chris McVoy Maggie's Centre. Image © Steven Holl Architects Model of Hunter's Point Community Library. Image © Steven Holl Architects Hunter's Point Community Library. Exterior Concrete Mockup. Image © Steven Holl Architects +47

Knight Foundation Offers $5 Million to Realize Ideas to Improve Cities Across the US

16:00 - 17 October, 2015
Knight Foundation Offers $5 Million to Realize Ideas to Improve Cities Across the US, Courtesy of The Knight Foundation
Courtesy of The Knight Foundation

The Knight Foundation has announced their second Knight Cities Challenge – a grant with a pool of $5 million to be awarded for city-improving ideas. Applications can be submitted by anyone, professional, student or amateur. Projects must take place in, or benefit one or more of the 26 knight communities across the United States, and focus on one or all of three key drivers of city success: attracting and retaining talent, expanding economic opportunity, and creating a culture of robust civic engagement.

New Seattle Proposal Caps I-5 Freeway With a Two Mile Park

08:00 - 15 October, 2015
Courtesy of Patano Studio Architecture
Courtesy of Patano Studio Architecture

Patano Studio Architecture has created a proposal for a 45-acre, two-mile park spanning over the top of the Interstate-5 freeway in Seattle. Called C.A.P., the plan “proposes a city-wide architectural infrastructure solution to multiple issues facing the fast growing city.”

Proposals for Portland, New York Win US Tall Wood Building Prize

08:00 - 17 September, 2015
Proposals for Portland, New York Win US Tall Wood Building Prize, Framework; Portland, Oregon / Framework, LLC. Image Courtesy of LEVER Architecture
Framework; Portland, Oregon / Framework, LLC. Image Courtesy of LEVER Architecture

US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, in partnership with the Softwood Lumber Board and the Binational Softwood Lumber Council, has announced the winners of the US Tall Wood Building Prize Competition. The two winning projects—Framework, by Framework, LLC, and 475 West 18th, by 130-134 Holdings LLC—will each receive $1.5 million in funding for their development in Portland and New York, respectively. 

Each of the projects took a unique perspective on wood building systems, fulfilling the competition’s call “to showcase the safe application, practicality, and sustainability of a minimum 80-foot structure that uses mass timber, composite wood technologies, and innovative building techniques.”

A Future Vision for the 'American Dream'

04:00 - 9 September, 2015
A Future Vision for the 'American Dream', Assembling Suburbia. Image © Marcin Chmura
Assembling Suburbia. Image © Marcin Chmura

Marcin Chmura, a recent graduate from London's Bartlett School of Architecture, has developed a project which attempts to imagine a new future for the 'American Dream'. The United Suburbs of AmeriKa, named after Franz Kafka’s novel in which—despite never having visited America—he depicts the United States as a utopia offering eternal wealth and happiness for his foreign protagonist.

AIA Launches Campaign Against Unpaid Internships

08:00 - 7 August, 2015
AIA Launches Campaign Against Unpaid Internships , Courtesy of The American Institute of Architects
Courtesy of The American Institute of Architects

The American Institute of Architects’ Center for Emerging Professionals has announced its newest campaign, called Know Your Worth, which seeks to inform “all generations of architects about the value Emerging Professionals bring to the field, and the importance of getting paid for internship hours.”

While the issue of unpaid internships in the architecture field has gradually been improving, many students and emerging professionals are still faced with the dilemma. Thus, through the campaign, the AIA hopes that it will be able to inform students, architects, and others of federal compensation requirements, as well as to instill a sense of value for emerging professionals and the important work that they do. 

Chicago Architecture Biennial Announces Lakefront Kiosk Winners

08:00 - 5 August, 2015
Chicago Architecture Biennial Announces Lakefront Kiosk Winners, Finalist: Lakefront Kiosk / TRU Architekten. Image Courtesy of The Chicago Architecture Biennial
Finalist: Lakefront Kiosk / TRU Architekten. Image Courtesy of The Chicago Architecture Biennial

The Chicago Architecture Biennial, in partnership with the Chicago Park District and BP, has announced the winner of its Lakefront Kiosk Competition, which sought out designs for an innovative lakefront kiosk to be inaugurated on October 3 for the opening of the Biennial.

In addition to the winner of the competition, the Biennial is also partnering with local schools—the Illinois Institute of Technology, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and the University of Illinois at Chicago—in order to build three more kiosks to be featured at the Biennial. View the grand prize design, as well as three competition finalists, honorable mentions, and the three architecture school designs after the break.

From Seville to San Francisco: 3 Pelli Clarke Pelli Projects in Progress

08:00 - 23 July, 2015
From Seville to San Francisco: 3 Pelli Clarke Pelli Projects in Progress , Hancher Under Construction. Image Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects
Hancher Under Construction. Image Courtesy of Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects

US firm Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects is renowned for their iconic and sustainable designs, having won numerous awards, including the AIA’s Firm Award. They currently have several projects under construction, ranging from a transit center in San Francisco to an office and retail tower in Seville, Spain. Read on after the break for an overview of three of their current projects, all in various states of completion.

NCARB's 2015 Report Projects Positive Future for the Architecture Profession

08:00 - 15 July, 2015
NCARB's 2015 Report Projects Positive Future for the Architecture Profession, Screenshot Taken from NCARB Report
Screenshot Taken from NCARB Report

The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) has released “NCARB by the Numbers,” their annual report featuring statistics important to the architecture profession in the US. NCARB’s research portrays a positive future for the profession, with statistics showing that diversity is growing, architects are becoming licensed at an earlier age and progressing through licensure paths more quickly than in previous years, and more architects are becoming licensed than ever before.

The 2015 report covers the causes and effects of the results, looking into the impact of location and education. A section entitled “Jurisdictions by the Numbers,” lays out standardized relevant information for viewers to investigate conditions in the architecture profession in each state. The report also includes an analysis of the role of NAAB-accredited programs in helping architects achieve licensure.

Learn more on the information in NCARB’s report after the break.

Travel Through 115 Years of U.S. Residential Architecture in this Interactive Infographic by iMove

16:00 - 28 June, 2015
Travel Through 115 Years of U.S. Residential Architecture in this Interactive Infographic by iMove, Screenshot from "115 Years of American Homes Scrolling Parallax Infographic"
Screenshot from "115 Years of American Homes Scrolling Parallax Infographic"

Moving specialists iMove have created 115 Years of American Homes, a Scrolling Parallax Infographic in which viewers can “drive” through a neighborhood of single-family homes that reflect the style of their respective decades. For each home, graphics detail “tell-tale architectural features, design trends, average home price, and the historical and cultural context” of each decade from the 1900s through the present. Test out the interactive timeline here, and let us know: which decade of residential architecture is your favorite?

AECOM's Basketball Training Facility Encases a Diverse Range of Program in LA

14:00 - 13 June, 2015
AECOM's Basketball Training Facility Encases a Diverse Range of Program in LA, Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio
Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio

AECOM has designed a $42,000,000 campus and training facility for a professional basketball organization in West Los Angeles. The building contains a basketball arena, corporate headquarters, a hall of fame, and gardens, among other programs. Despite the building’s varied uses, AECOM was determined to make it “basketball centric.”

Courtesy of AECOM Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio Interior Court Render / AECOM LA Design Studio Courtesy of AECOM LA Design Studio +13

Help the National Building Museum and Snarkitecture Bring a Beach to D.C.

14:00 - 7 June, 2015
Help the National Building Museum and Snarkitecture Bring a Beach to D.C., Courtesy of Snarkitecture
Courtesy of Snarkitecture

In partnership with Brooklyn-based Snarkitecture, the National Building Museum (NBM) in Washington, D.C. aims to once again create an interactive architectural exhibit as a part of its “Summer Block Party” programming. While last year’s exhibit included a life-sized maze by BIG, this summer, the museum will host a 10,000 square foot enclosure in its Great Hall called the BEACH.

NCARB Discards “Intern” Title

09:00 - 22 May, 2015
NCARB Discards “Intern” Title, © AstroStar via Shutterstock
© AstroStar via Shutterstock

The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), the governing body for much of the architectural profession in the US, is taking steps to take “intern” out of architectural vocabulary. In a press statement, NCARB president Dale McKinney, FAIA, NCARB, said that in the future, NCARB will only encourage regulatory language for post-licensure individuals

“Architects are those who have met all the requirements to become licensed in states and jurisdictions throughout the United States,” McKinney said. “Everyone else is not an architect. But their status also doesn’t need a regulatory title such as ‘intern’ or any similar reference. This has become a term that has been perceived as negative by many in the architecture community and a term that really does not fully value the work that aspiring architects bring to the profession.”