Spatial Relations Take Centre Stage in MoMA’s Newest Architectural Exhibition

Herzog & de Meuron’s National Stadium, Beijing. 2008. Image ©

What influence do art and space have on the contemporary architectural design process? MoMA‘s most recent on architecture and design Conceptions of Space strives to answer this question. Themed under the umbrella of spatial relations, Curator Pedro Gadanho ruminates on the subject in a broad and philosophical sense. The exhibition delves into the topic using an interdisciplinary approach, incorporating research from French philosopher Michel Foucault on the subject of the expanded field. The exhibition aims to explore the relationship between the development of space and its deep-seated roots in the creative arts.

Roof & Mushrooms Pavilion / Ryue Nishizawa + Nendo

© Daici Ano

Architects: Ryue Nishizawa, Nendo
Location: Kyoto University of Art and Design, 2-116 北白川瓜生山 Sakyo Ward, Kyoto, Kyoto Prefecture 606-8271,
Year: 2013
Photographs: Daici Ano

Ochoalcubo: Japan + Chile

Sou Fujimoto and Yoshiharu Tsukamoto (Atelier Bow-Wow) at the Ochoquebradas site © Courtesy of Max Nuñez

In , a very special project is being developed.

Eduardo Godoy, a design impresario who started his business in Chile in the 80′s, has always been an advocate for design and architecture in the country. In Chile, more than 40 schools of architecture have flooded the market, but the ever growing number of professionals has had a relatively small impact on Chilean cities. Seeing the almost infinite landscape of cookie cutter housing in the suburbs, Godoy asked himself: why not break this model into smaller pieces, each designed by a particular architect, each an opportunity for a young professional? With this in mind, and to foster the appreciation for architects, Eduardo and his team at Interdesign started a project called “Ochoalcubo” (Eight-Cubed). His original idea was to make 8 projects, with 8 buildings designed each by 8 architects, to create developments where the singularity of each piece was key, in order to demonstrate how the individuality of the architect could result in good architecture.

Hiroshi Senju Museum / Ryue Nishizawa

© Iwan Baan

Iwan Baan, who has photographed many well-known architectural works, many which have been featured on ArchDaily, recently shot the Hiroshi Senju Museum, designed by Tokyo based architect Ryue Nishizawa who won the Pritzker Prize in 2010 and is known for his works of various scales throughout .. The museum opened in October 2011 and possesses around 100 works by Hiroshi, a Japanese painter known for his large scale waterfall paintings. More photos of the museum can be viewed after the break and the complete photoset in Iwan’s website.

Teshima Art Museum / Ryue Nishizawa

© Iwan Baan

The Teshima Art Museum designed by Tokyo-based architect Ryue Nishizawa and Japanese artist Rei Naito opened in 2010 for the Setouchi International Art Festival that was held in the Takamatsu Port area of .  The open gallery space features 25cm thick concrete shell with two elliptical openings that are open to elements.  Iwan Baan shows on his website a great photo set of the art museum which can be viewed here.

More of Iwan Baan’s photographs following the break, as well as a video of the Teshima Art Museum while under construction.