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Janet Echelman Suspends Net Sculpture Over London's Oxford Circus

12:00 - 15 January, 2016
Janet Echelman Suspends Net Sculpture Over London's Oxford Circus, 1.8 London, Janet Echelman, Lumiere London 2016, produced by Artichoke, supported by the Mayor of London. Image © Ema Peter
1.8 London, Janet Echelman, Lumiere London 2016, produced by Artichoke, supported by the Mayor of London. Image © Ema Peter

London is the latest city to host one of Janet Echelman's stunning net sculptures. Suspended 180 feet above Oxford Circus, the city's busiest intersections, the colorful floating form was inspired by 1.8 - "the length of time in microseconds that the earth’s day was shortened" as a result of Japan's devastating 2011 earthquake and tsunami. 

"The sculpture’s form was inspired by data sets of the tsunami’s wave heights rippling across the entire Pacific Ocean," says the studio. "The artwork delves into content related to our complex interdependencies with larger cycles of time and our physical world. The sculpture’s net structure is a physical manifestation of interconnectedness – when any one element moves, every other element is affected."

Janet Echelman Suspends Massive Aerial Sculpture Over Boston's Greenway

18:30 - 4 May, 2015
Janet Echelman Suspends Massive Aerial Sculpture Over Boston's Greenway, © Peter Vanderwarker
© Peter Vanderwarker

Janet Echelman's latest aerial sculpture has been suspended 365 feet above Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. On view through October 2015, the monumental installation spans 600 feet, occupying a void where an elevated highway once divided the city's downtown from its waterfront. 

"The sculpture’s form echoes the history of its location," describes Echelman. "The three voids recall the 'Tri-Mountain' which was razed in the 18th-century to create land from the harbor. The colored banding is a nod to the six traffic lanes that once overwhelmed the neighborhood, before the Big Dig buried them and enabled the space to be reclaimed for urban pedestrian life."

© Peter Vanderwarker © Melissa Henry © Melissa Henry © Melissa Henry +14

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Unveils Janet Echelman's Latest Work: "Impatient Optimist” in Seattle

00:00 - 12 February, 2015
The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Unveils Janet Echelman's Latest Work: "Impatient Optimist” in Seattle, Janet Echelman / Impatient Optimist. Image © Ema Peter
Janet Echelman / Impatient Optimist. Image © Ema Peter

A new aerial sculpture by renowned artist Janet Echelman has been installed at the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation campus in Seattle. Entitled "Impatient Optimist," the sculpture consists of a custom net structure suspended above the courtyard, resulting in an ethereal floating surface which seems to defy gravity. The award-winning artist's piece hovers above the city as a symbol of connectivity and stands as a testament to the impact an individual can have on a broader scale. 

Janet Echelman / Impatient Optimist. Image © Ema Peter Janet Echelman / Impatient Optimist. Image © Ema Peter Janet Echelman / Impatient Optimist. Image © Ema Peter Janet Echelman / Impatient Optimist. Image © Ema Peter +7

Janet Echelman's Largest Aerial Sculpture To Premiere in Vancouver

01:00 - 15 March, 2014
Janet Echelman's Largest Aerial Sculpture To Premiere in Vancouver, © Ema Peter / Studio Echelman
© Ema Peter / Studio Echelman

American Artist Janet Echelman is to premiere her latest, and largest, sculpture in Vancouver. Widely known for her artistic ability to reshape urban airspace, Echelman's sophisticated mixture of ancient craft and modern technology has led to collaborations with aeronautical and mechanical engineers, architects, lighting designers, landscape architects, and fabricators to "transform urban environments world wide with her net sculptures." Using a light weight fibre to elevate her monumental "breathing" forms above the streets of urban centres, Echelman's new sculpture will be of a size and scale never before attempted.

Courtesy of Studio Echelman © Ema Peter / Studio Echelman © Ema Peter / Studio Echelman © Ema Peter / Studio Echelman +22