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  1. ArchDaily
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  3. Janet Echelman's Railroad-Inspired Net Sculpture Premiers in North Carolina

Janet Echelman's Railroad-Inspired Net Sculpture Premiers in North Carolina

Janet Echelman's Railroad-Inspired Net Sculpture Premiers in North Carolina
Janet Echelman's Railroad-Inspired Net Sculpture Premiers in North Carolina, © Lynn Donovan/CFGG
© Lynn Donovan/CFGG

Janet Echelman has completed her most recent aerial net sculpture in downtown Greensboro, North Carolina. Made up of over 35 miles of technical twine woven into 242,800 knots, the sculptures adds a new ephemeral presence to the sky above the city’s new LeBauer Park. Entitled “Where We Met,” the sculpture’s form and composition were inspired by Greensboro’s history as a railroad and textile hub.

© Cecelia Thompson via The Public Art Endowment © Lynn Donovan/CFGG © Lynn Donovan/CFGG © Lynn Donovan/CFGG + 5

© Cecelia Thompson via The Public Art Endowment
© Cecelia Thompson via The Public Art Endowment

“When I was asked to give visual form to the history of Greensboro and the textile tradition of North Carolina, I began with research,” explains Echelman. “I discovered that Greensboro was nicknamed the “Gateway City” because six railroad lines intersected there, and I started tracing the railway lines and marking the historic textile mills that dotted the routes. These routes brought together people from diverse cultures and races, so I wove together lines of brilliant color that meet at the center, and titled it “Where We Met”.

© Lynn Donovan/CFGG
© Lynn Donovan/CFGG

The piece spans a 200 foot by 130 foot area between four 60-foot-tall masts, each capable of bearing up to 6 tons of force. Designed to withstand the effects of wind and sun, the fiber used to construct the net is fifteen times stronger than steel by weight, and has a 100 percent resistance to UV radiation.

Hoists built into the 30” diameter pylons allow the net to be raised and lowered, and a swiveling pulley at the top of each pylon allows the angle of the support cable to move as the sculpture sways in the wind.

© Lynn Donovan/CFGG
© Lynn Donovan/CFGG

“Where We Met” was commissioned through a $1 million grant to the Community Foundation’s Public Art Endowment, who selected Echelman to create a sculpture responding to Greensboro’s textile history. The project is part of a nearly $300 million masterplan centered around LeBauer park aimed at revitalizing downtown Greensboro and the surrounding community.

© Lynn Donovan/CFGG
© Lynn Donovan/CFGG

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About this author
Patrick Lynch
Author
Cite: Patrick Lynch. "Janet Echelman's Railroad-Inspired Net Sculpture Premiers in North Carolina" 16 Aug 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/793438/janet-echelmans-railroad-inspired-net-sculpture-premiers-in-north-carolina/> ISSN 0719-8884
© Lynn Donovan/CFGG

Janet Echelman在北卡罗来纳州受铁路启发的雕塑装置

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