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Housing

New Drone Footage Shows Construction of the Largest Residential Development in Bushwick, New York

06:00 - 20 September, 2017

ODA New York’s design for Bushwick II, a high-end residential complex on the former site of Brooklyn’s Rheingold Brewery, is coming to life in the fast-growing neighborhood of Bushwick, New York. Developed by All Year Management, 123 Melrose is already being clad. Meanwhile, Rabksy Group’s development, 10 Montieth, recently topped out. 

Together, the projects will cover three full city blocks, totaling 1.35 million gross square feet. Bushwick II will be the largest housing increase this neighborhood of Brooklyn has ever seen.

New Drone Footage Shows Construction of the Largest Residential Development in Bushwick, New York Courtesy of ODA New York Courtesy of ODA New York Courtesy of ODA New York + 24

Call for Submissions: Indigenous Housing Canada 2017

15:00 - 22 August, 2017
Call for Submissions: Indigenous Housing Canada 2017, Indigenous Housing Completion; Credit: AWB Canada
Indigenous Housing Completion; Credit: AWB Canada

The Indigenous Housing Competition Canada invites everyone, students and professionals, to submit ideas for remote access Indigenous Community housing in Canada.

House W / Atelier About Architecture

22:00 - 3 August, 2017
House W / Atelier About Architecture, Courtesy of Atelier About Architecture
Courtesy of Atelier About Architecture

Courtesy of Atelier About Architecture Courtesy of Atelier About Architecture Courtesy of Atelier About Architecture Courtesy of Atelier About Architecture + 35

The Origins of Half-Timbering: 2000 Years of Non-Stop Nostalgia

04:00 - 2 August, 2017
The Origins of Half-Timbering: 2000 Years of Non-Stop Nostalgia, Sam Jacob Studio's "Half Timbered" T-Shirt. Image © Sam Jacob Studio
Sam Jacob Studio's "Half Timbered" T-Shirt. Image © Sam Jacob Studio

Sam Jacob Studio harbours a long-held fascination with Half-Timbering. In this essay, Jacob examines the historical, cultural, and aesthetic roots of the style.

It’s fair to say that “Mock Tudor”—that black and white facade treatment—has a less than glowing reputation. Take these sneering lines from John Betjeman’s Slough, for instance:

It’s not their fault they often go / To Maidenhead / And talk of sports and makes of cars / In various bogus Tudor bars.

(Perhaps those very same bars that Martin Freeman’s character in The Office notes have “a sign in the toilet saying: Don’t get your Hampton Court”.) “Mock Tudor” is often accused of “bogus”-ness, of lacking authenticity, of fakeness, and many other types of architectural sin.

"Moe's Tavern" from "The Simpsons". Image via "The Simpsons" / Fandom Little Moreton Hall, England. © <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_Moreton_Hall#/media/File:LittleMoretonHall.jpg">Wikimedia Commons user Christine-Ann Martin</a> licensed under <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/">CC BY 3.0</a>. Image Courtesy of Christine-Ann Martin Anne Hathaway's Cottage, England. © <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tudor_architecture#/media/File:Anne_Hathaways_Cottage_1_(5662418953).jpg">Wikimedia Commons user Tony Hisgett</a> licensed under <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/">CC BY 2.0</a>. Image Courtesy of Tony Hisgett Death of Harold (detail from the Bayeux Tapestry). © <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Bayeux_Tapestry_scene57_Harold_death.jpg">Wikimedia Commons user Myrabella</a> available in the Public Domain. Image Courtesy of Myrabella + 6

a+u 2017:07: Melancholy & Dwelling, Contemporary Houses in Denmark

04:00 - 10 July, 2017
a+u 2017:07: Melancholy & Dwelling, Contemporary Houses in Denmark

The July 2017 issue of a+u invites Lise Juel, Danish architect and collaborator of Jørn Utzon, to discover "melancholic" quality of contemporary houses located in the Nordic countries.

The World's Most Expensive Cities in 2017 (And Why They Are So Expensive)

09:30 - 3 July, 2017
The World's Most Expensive Cities in 2017 (And Why They Are So Expensive)

As anyone who has recently attempted apartment-hunting in a major urban area will know, reasonably-priced housing can be difficult to come by for many and salaries don’t always seem to match the cost of living. This gap is contributing to housing crises in developed and developing countries worldwide. People are simply being priced out of cities, where housing has become a commodity instead of a basic human right. Financial speculation and states’ support of financial markets in a way that makes housing unaffordable has created an unsustainable global housing crisis. 

Earlier this year the 13th Annual Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey was released for 2017, revealing that the number of “severely unaffordable” major housing markets rose from 26 to 29 this year; the problem is getting worse. The study evaluates 406 metropolitan housing markets in nine of the world's major economies and uses the “median multiple” approach to determine affordability. By dividing the median house price by the median household income of an area, this method is meant to be a summary of “middle-income housing affordability.”

UK's First "Naked House" Proposal Aims to Bring Affordability to London's Housing Market

12:45 - 24 April, 2017
Elevation. Image Courtesy of OMMX
Elevation. Image Courtesy of OMMX

The average cost of a home in London has now reached over £500,000 ($640,000), a figure far beyond the reach of the large majority of individuals or families on or below the average UK income (£34,473, or just under $45,000, per year). It’s a story which has been told time and again in recent years; the “housing crisis” of affordability continues to exacerbate the lives of a generation.

For Naked House, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to “stripping affordable housing back to the bare essentials,” crisis necessitates a creative response. With support and funding from the GLA (Greater London Authority) and the incumbent Mayor of London, who has awarded a £500,000 grant to the development, they—in collaboration with OMMX—have now made an important step closer to realizing their vision.

Site model. Image Courtesy of OMMX Interior space. Image Courtesy of OMMX Sectional model. Image Courtesy of OMMX Perspective based on the urban typology of a "Mews". Image Courtesy of OMMX + 5

The Economics Behind New York's Micro-Apartment Experiment

09:30 - 4 April, 2017
Are micro-apartments a revolutionary trend? Or are developers exploiting an out-of-control market? Carmel Place, located in Manhattan's Kips Bay, features 55 units that range from 260 to 360 square feet. Image Courtesy of Cameron Blayock
Are micro-apartments a revolutionary trend? Or are developers exploiting an out-of-control market? Carmel Place, located in Manhattan's Kips Bay, features 55 units that range from 260 to 360 square feet. Image Courtesy of Cameron Blayock

This article was originally published by The Architect's Newspaper as "Are micro-apartments a revolutionary trend? Or are developers exploiting an out-of-control market?"

The situation was dire: People were flocking to cities for work, but scarce land and lack of new construction were driving up rent prices. Middle-income residents couldn’t afford the high-end housing stock, nor did they want to enter cramped—sometimes illegally so—apartments. Luckily, a new housing solution appeared: In exchange for small, single-occupancy units, residents could share amenities—like a restaurant-kitchen, dining area, lounge, and cleaning services—that were possible thanks to economies of scale. Sound familiar?

It should: It’s the basic premise behind Carmel Place, a micro-apartment development in Manhattan’s Kips Bay that recently started leasing. The development—whose 55 units range from 260 to 360 square feet—was the result of Mayor Bloomberg’s 2012 adAPT NYC Competition to find housing solutions for the city’s shortage of one- and two-person apartments. Back then, Carmel Place needed special legal exceptions to be built, but last March the city removed the 400-square-foot minimum on individual units. While density controls mean another all-micro-apartment building is unlikely, only building codes will provide a de facto minimum unit size (somewhere in the upper 200 square foot range). What does this deregulation mean for New York City’s always-turbulent housing market? Will New Yorkers get new, sorely needed housing options or a raw deal?

Courtesy of Cameron Blayock Courtesy of Cameron Blayock A high-quality of life is central to Carmel Place’s sell to market-rate renters: Multiple personal services (like housekeeping) and space-saving furniture are included in the rent, and units boast nearly 10-foot-tall ceilings and 8-foot-tall windows to maximize natural light. Image Courtesy of Ollie Courtesy of Ollie + 19

"RRURBAN" Explores the Potential of Individualism in Collective Urban Housing

06:00 - 29 March, 2017
"RRURBAN" Explores the Potential of Individualism in Collective Urban Housing, Cortesía de MAPAA
Cortesía de MAPAA

Cortesía de MAPAA Cortesía de MAPAA Cortesía de MAPAA Cortesía de MAPAA + 13

In this article Marcos Parga, director of the Madrid-based office MAPAA, presents an exploratory essay on the possibilities of living in developed urban centers, taking as a case study a site between two existing party walls in Madrid. The objective of MAPAA's exercise is to seek ways to enjoy the benefits of rural life, such as close contact with nature, in the city.

"Corridors of Diversity": Showcasing the Secret of Singapore's Public Housing Success

09:30 - 15 March, 2017

Singapore’s first Housing and Development Board (HDB) housing blocks were erected in November of 1960, in response to a severe lack of adequate housing for the country's 1.6 million citizens. Fast forward to 2017, and over 80% of the Singaporean population live in HDBs, with over 90% of them owning the home they live in. Often painted in vibrant colors, HDBs have a focus on community social spaces, more often than not maintaining the ground floor of the apartment blocks as open public space, exclusively for public meeting areas. These can include hawker centers, benches, tables, grills and pavilions where residents can socialize under cover from the hot Singaporean sun.

Diversity in Connection. Image © Siyuan Ma Diversity in Common. Image © Siyuan Ma Diversity in Transit. Image © Siyuan Ma Diversity in Beliefs. Image © Siyuan Ma + 11

AD Classics: Park Hill Estate / Jack Lynn and Ivor Smith

04:00 - 27 January, 2017
AD Classics: Park Hill Estate / Jack Lynn and Ivor Smith, © Wikimedia user/Flickr user Paolo Margari (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0)
© Wikimedia user/Flickr user Paolo Margari (licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0)

From its hilltop vantage point in the east end of Sheffield, UK, the Park Hill Estate surveys the post-industrial city which sprawls westwards. Its prominent location makes the estate highly visible and it has, over time, become engrained in the popular consciousness – a part of the fabric of the city. Although today it divides opinion, following its completion in 1961 it was hailed as an exemplary model for social housing. Designed by architects Jack Lynn and Ivor Smith under the supervision of Sheffield’s visionary City Architect John Lewis Womersley, the estate now stands as testament to an era when young British architects were revolutionizing the field of residential architecture with radical housing programs.

The Park Hill Estate was part of Womersley’s strategy to introduce more high-density housing to Sheffield, which he believed would foster a stronger sense of community than the ubiquitous back-to-back terraces.[1] This policy went hand in hand with an urgent need for slum clearance; The Park, a slum so notorious for its high crime rate that it was known locally as ‘Little Chicago,’ was demolished to make way for the estate.

After renovation. Image © Paul Dobraszczyk © Paul Dobraszczyk © Paul Dobraszczyk © Paul Dobraszczyk + 17

Dongziguan Affordable Housing for Relocalized Farmers / gad

19:00 - 3 January, 2017
Dongziguan Affordable Housing for Relocalized Farmers / gad, Courtesy of gad
Courtesy of gad

Courtesy of gad Courtesy of gad Courtesy of gad. ImageBird's view © Li Yao, Chunle Liao + 30

Real Takes on Real(ly Successful) Housing Experiments

09:30 - 13 December, 2016
Real Takes on Real(ly Successful) Housing Experiments

The challenges associated with the provision of adequate and affordable housing around the world demand that architects respond with original solutions that challenge traditional building forms, typologies and methods of delivery.

In recognition of this demand, last month’s World Architecture Festival in Berlin chose housing as its thematic focus. The festival made headlines with Patrik Schumacher’s inflammatory keynote speech that called for cities to be turned over entirely to market forces, scrapping social housing and privatizing all public space. The controversy that followed belied the diversity of the discourse on housing at the Festival and the presentation of innovative architectural responses to housing challenges.

What Exactly is Matti Suuronen's Futuro House?

04:00 - 12 December, 2016
What Exactly is Matti Suuronen's Futuro House?, © Gili Merin
© Gili Merin

The Futuro House looks more like an alien spacecraft than a building. Designed by Finnish architect Matti Suuronen in 1968 as a ski chalet, the radical design was subsequently marketed to the public as a small prefabricated home, easily assembled and installed on virtually any topography. Its plastic construction and futurist aesthetic combined to create a product which is identifiable with both the future and the past.

© Gili Merin © Gili Merin © Gili Merin © Gili Merin + 10

London's Aylesbury Estate: A Housing Project Then and Now

04:00 - 9 December, 2016

Originally built to house over 7,000 people in the 1970s, the Aylesbury Estate in South East London was once one of largest housing projects in Europe. In recent years it has "fallen into rapid decline" and, according to British filmmaker Joe Gilbert, "perfectly encapsulates the growing housing crisis and problems caused by gentrification." With narration by Tom Dyckhoff, this short film aims to capture the reality of a housing utopia which has de-evolved into an uncomfortable reality.

See How New York’s Pilot Scheme of Modular Microhouses Was Built

09:30 - 26 November, 2016

[In New York] there’s this math problem: 1.8 million small households and only one million suitable apartments. – Mimi Hoang, principal of nArchitects

Last year, nArchitects released a trailer that teased the development of their winning adAPT NYC entry, Carmel Place (formerly known as My Micro NY). The competition sought to address the need for small household apartments in New York City. Now in a newly released video, the full story of the city’s tallest modular tower comes together in smooth timelapse to a dainty piano soundtrack.

© Pablo Enriquez © Pablo Enriquez © Pablo Enriquez © Pablo Enriquez + 26

COBE Designs Housing and Culinary Experiences to be Built on Top of Copenhagen Metro Station

12:00 - 22 November, 2016
COBE Designs Housing and Culinary Experiences to be Built on Top of Copenhagen Metro Station, Courtesy of COBE
Courtesy of COBE

The City of Frederiksberg, along with Real-dania By and Byg Foundation have selected a team led by Danish architects COBE to develop the "House of Food Culture." The project will be constructed on top of the new metro stations in Copenhagen's new Metro City Ring. The House of Food Culture and its townhouses will be built in brick, imitating the neighbouring facade lines and keeping with the style of the historic surroundings.

The House of Food Culture is to be built on top of the entrance to the forthcoming metro station that will host a daily flow of 10,000 people, while focusing on making it the focal point for urban life and a central meeting place. 

Courtesy of COBE Courtesy of COBE Courtesy of COBE Courtesy of COBE + 11

UNStudio + Heerim Win Competition for Resident-Driven Housing Development in Seoul

12:00 - 16 November, 2016
UNStudio + Heerim Win Competition for Resident-Driven Housing Development in Seoul, Courtesy of UNStudio
Courtesy of UNStudio

UNStudio, in collaboration with Korean firm Heerim Architects & Planners, has won the competition to design the 32 tower masterplan of Eunma Housing Development in the neighborhood of Daechi-Dong, Seoul. The unique project commission is being led by the residents of the Eunma Housing Development themselves, who have tasked the architects with redeveloping their current homes into a new, future-orientated eco-design that can be used as a blueprint for other resident-driven development projects.

Courtesy of UNStudio Masterplan. Image Courtesy of UNStudio Spatial Planning. Image Courtesy of UNStudio Landscape Planning. Image Courtesy of UNStudio + 6