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Gallery: Tour Chandigarh Through the Lens of Fernanda Antonio

08:00 - 26 August, 2015
Gallery: Tour Chandigarh Through the Lens of Fernanda Antonio, Palace of the Assembly. Le Corbusier. Image © Fernanda Antonio
Palace of the Assembly. Le Corbusier. Image © Fernanda Antonio

Gandhi Bhawan. Pierre Jeanneret. Image © Fernanda Antonio Chandigarh Architecture Museum. Le Corbusier. Image © Fernanda Antonio Open Hand Monument. Le Corbusier. Image © Fernanda Antonio Tower of Shadows. Le Corbusier. Image © Fernanda Antonio +61

Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret built sublime works amidst the unique landscape of Chandigarh, at the foothills of the Himalayas. They gave the city a new order, creating new axises, new perspectives and new landmarks. Built in the 1950s and early 1960s, the buildings form one of the most significant architectural complexes of the 20th century, offering a unique experience for visitors. 

Architect and photographer Fernanda Antonio has shared photos with us from her journey throughout the city, capturing eight buildings and monuments, with special attention given to Le Corbusier’s Capital Complex. View all of the images after the break.

Open Call: Chandigarh Unbuilt Competition to Complete Le Corbusier's Capitol

16:00 - 2 August, 2015
Open Call: Chandigarh Unbuilt Competition to Complete Le Corbusier's Capitol, Courtesy of archasm
Courtesy of archasm

Online international competition organizer archasm has launched its “Chandigarh Unbuilt: Completing the Capitol” ideas competition, which seeks designs to finalize and complement Le Corbusier’s Capitol Complex in ChandigarhIndia.

Three buildings at the complex have been built according to Le Corbusier’s plans—the Secretariat, Assembly Hall, and High Court—but the fourth and final building, called the Museum of Knowledge, has yet to be conceptualized.

6 Politically Motivated Cities Built From Scratch

10:30 - 31 March, 2015
6 Politically Motivated Cities Built From Scratch, Image of the planned new capital of Egypt, masterplanned by SOM. Image © SOM
Image of the planned new capital of Egypt, masterplanned by SOM. Image © SOM

Threatening to end Cairo’s 1,046 year dominance as the country’s capital, earlier this month the government of Egypt announced their intentions to create a new, yet-to-be-named capital city just east of New Cairo. The promise of the more than 270 square mile ‘new New Cairo’ has attracted headlines from around the world with its sheer scale; a $45 billion development of housing, shopping and landmarks designed to attract tourism from day one, including a theme park larger than Disneyland. And of course, the plans include the promise of homes - for at least 5 million residents in fact, with the vast number of schools, hospitals and religious and community buildings that a modern city requires - making the new capital of Egypt the largest planned city in history.

The idea of building a new capital city has appealed to governments across history; a way to wipe the slate clean, stimulate the economy and lay out your vision of the world in stone, concrete and parkland. Even old Cairo was founded as a purpose built capital, although admittedly urban planning has changed a little since then. It continues to change today; see the full list of different ways to build a totally new city after the break.

Image of the planned new capital of Egypt, masterplanned by SOM. Image © SOM Train station. Image © SOM Government District. Image © SOM Concept of Cairo's replacement by Skidmore, Owings and Merril. Image © SOM +44

Chandigarh Under Siege: Le Corbusier’s Capitol Complex Threatened by Housing Development

09:30 - 28 March, 2015
Chandigarh Under Siege: Le Corbusier’s Capitol Complex Threatened by Housing Development, Chandigarh's Palace of the Assembly in the foreground facing the High Court in the background. Image © Flickr CC user Eduardo Guiot
Chandigarh's Palace of the Assembly in the foreground facing the High Court in the background. Image © Flickr CC user Eduardo Guiot

Dr. Vikramāditya Prakāsh is a professor at the University of Washington and the founder of the Chandigarh Urban Lab. In the following article he discusses the past, present and future of Le Corbusier's vision for Chandigarh, explaining the reasons behind the petition he started against a new residential development to the North of the city.

Le Corbusier’s famous Capitol Complex in Chandigarh, India is about to be ruined by the construction of a gaggle of towers to its immediate north. The new project, called ‘TATA Camelot’, is being developed by TATA Housing, the real estate wing of TATA Group, a major multinational and one of India's largest industrial companies. TATA Camelot’s 27 proposed towers, each between 13 and 36 storys tall, will not only destroy the architectural and urban design integrity of the Capitol, they will also disrupt the fragile Himalayan ecology of the area. In the contest between development and preservation, it is the larger public good and the long term perspective of the ecological that must be prioritized.

TATA Camelot Phase I The Secretariat and the Assembly and their relationship to the mountains as it exists today. Image © Vikramāditya Prakāsh The Secretariat and its relationship to the mountains as it exists today. Image © Vikramāditya Prakāsh The master-plan concept overlaid over an aerial view of the city today showing the integral relationship between the ecology of the site and the city. Image Courtesy of Chandigarh Urban Lab, University of Washington on Google Earth original +10

AJA Restaurant / Arch.Lab

01:00 - 26 January, 2015
AJA Restaurant / Arch.Lab, © Purnesh Dev Nikhanj
© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj
  • Architects

  • Location

    Sector 11, Chandigarh, Chandigarh, India
  • Design Team

    Harsimran Singh, Mohit Vij, Taruni Aggarwal, Jasnam Kaur
  • Area

    900.0 ft2
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj © Purnesh Dev Nikhanj © Purnesh Dev Nikhanj © Purnesh Dev Nikhanj +17

Video: JS Dorton Arena, the Fairground Pavilion That Was a Modernist Marvel

00:00 - 4 September, 2014

The JS Dorton Arena, originally designed as a livestock judging pavilion for the North Carolina fairgrounds, was a deliberate political statement for the North Carolina State University about the courage of progress and value of taking risks. The architect, Matthew Nowicki, imagined a symphonic spatial experience where design, material and construction are choreographed in a highly challenging and sweeping, ambitious vision. Foregoing interior columns, the building combines intersecting parabolic arches of reinforced concrete with a grid of draped tension cables inspired by the tension system of the Golden Gate Bridge to support the entire span of the roof - the first of its kind.

Twin Courtyard House / Charged Voids

01:00 - 24 December, 2012
Twin Courtyard House / Charged Voids , © Purnesh Dev Nikhanj
© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj
  • Architects

  • Location

    Chandigarh, India
  • Project Team

    Aman Aggarwal, Siddarth gaind,Rahul Vig, Sugandha Wadhawan, Saurabh Vashist
  • Area

    500.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2012
  • Photographs

© Purnesh Dev Nikhanj © Purnesh Dev Nikhanj © Purnesh Dev Nikhanj © Purnesh Dev Nikhanj +23

AD Classics: Chandigarh Secretariat / Le Corbusier

01:00 - 26 September, 2011
AD Classics: Chandigarh Secretariat / Le Corbusier
  • Architects

  • Location

    Chandigarh, India
  • Architect

    Le Corbusier
  • References

    MIMOA
  • Project Year

    1962

AD Classics: Chandigarh Secretariat / Le Corbusier AD Classics: Chandigarh Secretariat / Le Corbusier AD Classics: Chandigarh Secretariat / Le Corbusier AD Classics: Chandigarh Secretariat / Le Corbusier +13

AD Classics: Expo '58 + Philips Pavilion / Le Corbusier and Iannis Xenakis

21:00 - 25 August, 2011
© <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>Wikimedia</a> commons / wouter hagens
© Wikimedia commons / wouter hagens

In 1956, preparations had begun for the 1958 World’s Fair in Brussels. This was to be the first World’s Fair held since the end of World War II, the concept behind the Expo was to celebrate the rejuvenation of civilization from the destruction of war through the use of technology. This World Fair is best known for the musical advances that was combined with architecture, creating a gestalt through an experiential encounter where body meets sound and space.

© <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>Wikimedia</a> commons / wouter hagens © <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>Wikimedia</a> commons / wouter hagens AD Classics: Expo '58 + Philips Pavilion / Le Corbusier and Iannis Xenakis © <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/'>Wikimedia</a> commons / wouter hagens +68

AD Classics: AD Classics: Palace of the Assembly / Le Corbusier

01:00 - 10 August, 2011
AD Classics: AD Classics: Palace of the Assembly / Le Corbusier, © Nicholas Iyadurai
© Nicholas Iyadurai

© Nicholas Iyadurai © Nicholas Iyadurai © Nicholas Iyadurai © Nicholas Iyadurai +12

One of Le Corbusier's most prominent buildings from India, the Palace of the Assembly in Chandigarh boasts his major architectural philosophies and style. Le Corbusier's five points of architecture can be found within the design from its open plan to the view of the Himalayan landscape. The program features a circular assembly chamber, a forum for conversation and transactions, and stair-free circulation.