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The Berkeley [IN]STITUTES in Environmental Design

The College of Environmental Design at the University of California, Berkeley, is offering three summer programs that introduce the study of architecture, landscape architecture, and sustainable city planning. These Berkeley STITUTES in Environmental Design are designed for post-baccalaureate students or senior-level undergraduates with majors in other fields who are interested in testing their enthusiasm for the material and culture of environmental design. The curriculum emphasizes the preparation of materials for application to graduate study in one of its disciplines. The STITUTES give students the opportunity to:

Monterey Residence / Forward Design Office

California-based Forward Design Office shared with us their design for a Monterey Residence in California. More images and architect’s description after the break.

Leading Edge Student Design Competition

The Leading Edge Student Design Competition seeks to support and enhance the study of sustainable and energy-efficient building practices in Architectural Education. We invite students and instructors of Architecture and Design to use the competition as a framework to explore the use of new materials and strategies for building and the integration of aesthetics and technology for high-performing, cutting edge architecture.

"Safe Trestles": Coalition Launches Two-Stage Design Competition

Access to Trestles, one of North America’s most celebrated waves, is under threat due to safety and environmental concerns. Currently, over 100,000 people each year follow informal trails through marshlands and over active train tracks to gain access to the surf breaks at Trestles. These impromptu manmade paths present a safety hazard with passing trains and threaten the fragile ecosystem of Trestles.

In response, a coalition of concerned groups organized by the volunteer non-profit organization Architecture for Humanity, are launching “Safe Trestles,” an open-to-all, two-stage design competition to create a safe pathway to serve surfers, the local coastal community and day visitors to San Onofre State Beach.

For more information on submission and requirements, click here. Watch a video after the break.

Tafoni Floating Home

The Tafoni Floating Home is a conceptual project from designer Joanna Borek-Clement.  The primary goal is to change the attitude towards living on a houseboat and promote a lifestyle that limits disruption of the environment. Tafoni is spacious, yet compact. Typical houseboats have low ceilings and often feel cramped, which can detract from comfort many residents desire of their homes. In contrast, even though Tafoni has a relatively small floor plate, it is spacious because of the high ceiling and the minimal amount of full-height interior partitions.

The partial-height sculptural walls divide the space visually and increase the interaction between people without limiting views. Tafoni is a multi-purpose living pavilion that serves as a permanent house, a weekend retreat, a relaxing summer destination or a place to entertain friends and hold business parties. In the current era of overpopulation and decreasing greenfields, building houseboats is a solution we should consider. More after the break.

Art Bridge / wHY Architecture

wHY Architecture has shown us their expertise on cultural projects at different scales: the Grand Rapids Art Museum (the first LEED Gold certified museum) on the large scale in one side and the Royal/T Gallery on a smaller scale, among other cultural projects shown on their website.

And now they share with us a cultural project on the infrastructure scale that I had the chance to see when I visited their office early this year, which got green light and enters construction phase in 2010: the Art Bridge.

The project is located over the Los Angeles river and it’s very related to it, as most of its structure will be built from trash salvaged from the river itself.  This project will achieve what many have been looking for, and that is to reconnect with the river that crosses LA. And I think that it will make it.

You can also watch our interview with Yo-ichiro Hakomori from whY Architecture, filmed at Postopolis! LA earlier this year.

Project description and more images after the break:

Deegan Day Design

Deegan Day Design, an architectural installation at the SCI-Arc Gallery in Los Angeles started on October 23 and will be available to everyone till December 13 with changing visual media throughout and public discussions with artists, architects and critics, including: An Te Liu, Bettina Korek, Andrea Fraser, Rhea Anastas, Bennett Simpson, Josh Melnick, Lauri Firstenberg, Sarah Morris Richard Massey, Eric Owen Moss, and Joe Day.

You can learn more at the exhibition’s official website. Watch a video after the break.

Prism Gallery / PATTERNS

PATTERNS has designed a new three story cultural center for West Hollywood, California.  The center, known as Prism, will become a cornerstone of artistic experimentation, carving a new niche for the arts in Southern California.   The facade will be the first in the nation to be constructed entirely out of a resin based composite polycarbonate. Inspired by automotive design supple forms, streamlined detailing and plastic finishes; the façade has a dual aesthetic performance associated to its plastic materiality and responsive to the lively energy of its context: it behaves as a reflectively glossy surface during daylight and as a translucent skin at night.

More about Prism after the break.

California Senior Housing Design Competition

Two San Francisco Bay Area housing non-profits, Suburban Alternatives Land Trust (SALT) and Northbay Family Homes (NFH) have, in the past 30 years, facilitated the building of 4,000 homes – half of them affordable to low-moderate income families. Together, SALT and NFH are sponsoring an open competition to develop ideas that optimize their site’s potential uses, including ideas that address the need for senior housing in a suburban setting.

Frontier Project / HMC Architects

The Frontier Project, located in Cucamonga, Southern California, is a 14,000 square foot demonstration building that will educate all in the community about the latest information, technologies and approaches regarding environmental friendliness.  The project will make resident consumers, commercial builders, and sustainable advocates aware and informed of the alternative building methods to encourage sustainability.  HMC Architects’ building will not just be something for visitors to look at and admire; rather, the building will become more of a learning experience as visitors are welcomed into its spaces and sustainable strategies are pointed out with their importance explained. “Everything from material and plant selection, the layout of space, and the maintenance regime will have a purpose, demonstrating the principle of green design for home owners, consumers, contractors, design professionals, sustainability advocates and the general public,” explained the Frontier Project founders.

More about the demonstration building, including a video and images, after the break.

Pine Mountain Road / Stanley Saitowitz Natoma Architects

When we shared our interview with Stanley Saitowitz, design principle of Natoma Architects Inc., earlier this week on AD, we promised to share his latest works. For his Pine Mountain Road weekend residence, Saitowitz creates “an elemental architecture of column and roof, a man made grove of habitation.”

Julius Shulman (1910-2009)

Case Study House #22, (playboy), 1960 Los Angeles, CA / Pierre Koenig, architect   © Julius Shulman
Case Study House #22, (playboy), 1960 Los Angeles, CA / Pierre Koenig, architect © Julius Shulman

Case Study Houses was a residential experiment sponsored by the Arts & Architecture magazine, introducing the modern movement ideas for affordable and efficient housing during the post-war years in the US. The result? Amazing houses by Richard Neutra, Raphael Soriano, Craig Ellwood, Charles and Ray Eames, Pierre Koenig and Eero Saarinen, built between 1945-1966 mostly in LA. Most of you already know about this… mostly due to the incredible photos that registered this houses, reflecting more than just pure architecture, a lifestyle. And the man (genius) behind the lens was Julius Shulman, who passed away yesterday July 16th, 2009. A selection of his photos after the break.

ARTIC / HOK

HOK‘s Los Angeles office, with Parsons Brinckerhoff, was just announced the winner for the ARTIC (Anaheim Regional Transportation Intermodal Center) in Anaheim, California.  This new transit center, featuring a high-speed rail network, will update Anaheim’s public transportation system and ignite further development in the city.  “We’re getting the critical infrastructure in place where you can actually envision a day in the future where you can reliably get around without a car,” added Todd Osborne, vice-president at HOK.

More about the ARTIC transit center after the break.

Big Blue Bus Redevelopment / LOHA + BMD

Further information after the break.

Sapphire Gallery / XTEN Architecture

Our friends from XTEN Architecture just sent us one of their latest projects. The Saphire Gallery is a residential gallery addition to a private residente in Los Angeles, California. It is designed to display a private collection of contemporary art while also providing for a home office with views to the sorrounding hills.

More images and architect’s description, after the break.

Multi-media Tower / Eric Owen Moss Architects

Eric Owen Moss Architects designed a multi-media tower which will sit at the primary entrance of the re-developed zone in Culver City, California.  The objective of the tower is to distribute art and other relevant content to the local and in-transit audiences passing by the site.

Further project description and more images after the break.

NBBJ presents design for UCLA's Pauley Pavilion

© NBBJ
© NBBJ

NBBJ just revealed their latest design for UCLA’s Pauley Pavilion, slated to begin February 2010 and be completed just in time for the 2012-2013 basketball season.   Upon UCLA’s decision to renovate the existing Pavilion due to its strong sentimental value, NBBJ’s design includes new lobby and concourse space, as well as new facilities for the athletes and additional seating for fans.

Project description and more images after the break.