Eyes on Boston: Urban Photo Walk

19:30 - 9 July, 2015
Image: Daniel Catt, Creative Commons License.
Image: Daniel Catt, Creative Commons License.

Explore how architectural photographers see the cityscape in this dynamic session suitable for beginner and intermediate photographers alike. During this intimate exploration of Boston’s Fort Point and Financial District neighborhoods, you will learn to produce memorable images that convey a sense of place, an expression of the architect’s ideas, and a connection to landscape and surroundings. Professional photographer Emily O’Brien will help you and other enthusiastic photographers see Boston in a whole new way. Take your photography to new heights!

How "Heroic: Concrete Architecture and the New Boston" Hopes to Reclaim America's Concrete Heritage

08:30 - 26 June, 2015
Paul Rudolph, Government Service Center (1962-71). Image © Mark Pasnik
Paul Rudolph, Government Service Center (1962-71). Image © Mark Pasnik

In 2007, when the late Mayor Thomas Menino announced his intentions to demolish Kallmann, McKinnell and Knowles' iconic Boston City Hall, he gave voice to a tragic but all-too-common popular discomfort with midcentury concrete architecture. Concerned that this threat was only the latest symptom of a pervasive misunderstanding of the significance of the concrete tradition, three architects - Mark Pasnik, Chris Grimley, and Michael Kubo - joined forces shortly thereafter to launch "The Heroic Project" and share their appreciation for this unfairly maligned chapter of architectural history. In addition to creating an internet web archive, Pasnik, Grimley, and Kubo jointly authored a forthcoming historical survey, Heroic: Concrete Architecture and the New Boston, scheduled to be released by The Monacelli Press in October 2015, which recasts the cultural and political story behind America's concrete heritage.

I.M. Pei & Partners and Araldo Cossutta, Associated Architects, Christian Science Center (1964-73). Image © Mark Pasnik Kallmann, McKinnell, & Knowles, Boston City Hall (1962-69). Image © Mark Pasnik Paul Rudolph, Government Service Center (1962-71). Image © Mark Pasnik Marcel Breuer & Associates, Madison Park High School (1966-77). Image © Mark Pasnik +12

Exhibition: Bigger Than a Breadbox, Smaller Than a Building

21:00 - 25 June, 2015
 Detail, The Pulp Canopy by Katie Donahue, Mason Limke, and Yandy Cheng of MYKA. Photo: Mike Lawrie.
Detail, The Pulp Canopy by Katie Donahue, Mason Limke, and Yandy Cheng of MYKA. Photo: Mike Lawrie.

BSA Space explores the power of architectural installations by featuring works by architects and designers who use this medium to test new technologies and building techniques, while executing pieces that are both sculptural and visually arresting. Curated by Rob Trumbour AIA and Aaron Willette of the design/research practice Khôra LLC., the exhibition presents more than 10 physical examples of the medium by an array of Boston-based and international designers.

E+ / Interface Studio Architects

15:00 - 25 May, 2015
© Sam Oberter Photography
© Sam Oberter Photography

© Sam Oberter Photography Courtesy of Urbanica Courtesy of Urbanica © Sam Oberter Photography +18

Janet Echelman Suspends Massive Aerial Sculpture Over Boston's Greenway

18:30 - 4 May, 2015
© Peter Vanderwarker
© Peter Vanderwarker

Janet Echelman's latest aerial sculpture has been suspended 365 feet above Boston's Rose Kennedy Greenway. On view through October 2015, the monumental installation spans 600 feet, occupying a void where an elevated highway once divided the city's downtown from its waterfront. 

"The sculpture’s form echoes the history of its location," describes Echelman. "The three voids recall the 'Tri-Mountain' which was razed in the 18th-century to create land from the harbor. The colored banding is a nod to the six traffic lanes that once overwhelmed the neighborhood, before the Big Dig buried them and enabled the space to be reclaimed for urban pedestrian life."

© Peter Vanderwarker © Melissa Henry © Melissa Henry © Melissa Henry +14

Apply Now: Safdie Architects Announces 2015 Research Fellowship

19:00 - 29 April, 2015
Artscience Museum and Marina Bay Sands in Singapore / Safdie Architects. Image © MBS Digital Media
Artscience Museum and Marina Bay Sands in Singapore / Safdie Architects. Image © MBS Digital Media

Safdie Architects’ 2015 Research Fellowship will center on the theme of “dense urbanism,” and the ways in which the field of architecture can rethink its approach to vital issues such as materiality, construction, environmental conditions, and the demographic realities of rapidly growing populations. This year, Moshe Safdie and his team invite exceptional individuals to attack the challenges of the contemporary urban landscape head-on by proposing new tools and solutions to create a better functioning and humane city. Accepted candidates will spend one year in residence at Safdie Architects’ Boston office, during which they will receive support from the practice and have access to the firm’s resources and consultants. 

Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building / Mecanoo + Sasaki Associates

10:00 - 29 April, 2015
Courtesy of Mecanoo
Courtesy of Mecanoo

Courtesy of Mecanoo Courtesy of Mecanoo Courtesy of Mecanoo Courtesy of Mecanoo +29

From Prisons to Parks: How the US Can Capitalize On Its Declining Prison Populations

10:30 - 24 April, 2015
The Former Bangalore jail in India, now Freedom Park . Image © Flickr CC user abhisheksundaram
The Former Bangalore jail in India, now Freedom Park . Image © Flickr CC user abhisheksundaram

Prisons are often seen as problematic for their local communities. After centuries of correctional facilities discouraging economic growth and occupying valuable real estate as a necessary component of towns and cities, many of these institutions have been relocated away from city centers and their abandoned vestiges are left as unpleasant reminders of their former use. In fact, the majority of prisons built in the United States since 1980 have been placed in non-metropolitan areas and once served as a substantial economic development strategy in depressed rural communities. [1] However, a new pressure is about to emerge on the US prison systems: beginning in 2010, America's prison population declined for the first time in decades, suggesting that in the near future repurposing these structures will become a particularly relevant endeavor for both community development and economic sustainability. These abandoned shells offer architects valuable opportunities to reimagine programmatic functions and transform an otherwise problematic location into an integral neighborhood space.

Why repurpose prisons rather than starting fresh? The answer to this question lies in the inherent architectural features of the prison typology, namely the fact that these structures are built to last. People also often forget that prison buildings are not limited to low-rise secure housing units - in fact, prisons feature an array of spaces that have great potential for reuse including buildings for light industrial activity, training or office buildings, low-security housing, and large outdoor spaces. These elements offer a wide variety of real estate for new programmatic uses, and cities around the world have begun to discover their potential. What could the US learn from these examples, at home and overseas?

The Former Bangalore jail in India, now Freedom Park . Image © Flickr CC user abhisheksundaram Boston's Liberty Hotel Interior. Image © Flickr CC user adewale_oshineye Aerial view of the former Lorton Prison. Image via Bing Maps Freedom Park in Lagos, Nigeria. Image via lagosfreedompark.com +9

Boston Living with Water Competition Names 9 Finalists

09:00 - 14 March, 2015
The Hydrokinetic Canal. Image Courtesy of Boston Living with Water
The Hydrokinetic Canal. Image Courtesy of Boston Living with Water

Nine finalists have emerged in the Boston Living with Water design competition. The ongoing initiative challenges competitors to address shifting climate conditions and sea level rise at one of three Boston sites anticipated to be affected by 2100. Although the 50 participating teams took different approaches to designing for climate change, all the submissions treated the rising sea level as a positive design force in Boston's built environment.

Check out the finalists, after the break.

Total Resilient Approach. Image Courtesy of Boston Living with Water Resilient Linkages. Image Courtesy of Boston Living with Water Water FUN(d). Image Courtesy of Boston Living with Water The Omega Chain. Image Courtesy of Boston Living with Water +10

Pei Cobb Freed Breaks Ground on Boston’s Tallest Residential Tower

00:00 - 27 January, 2015
© Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, Cambridge Seven Associates
© Pei Cobb Freed & Partners, Cambridge Seven Associates

Construction has commenced on Pei Cobb Freed & Partners’ 61-story condominium tower in Boston’s historic Back Bay. The $700 million development will be the tallest residential building in the city, and the tallest tower to rise since the 1976 John Hancock Tower, also designed by Pei Cobb Freed. 

“The project allows us to consider once again how a tall building, together with the open space it frames, can respond creatively to the need for growth while showing appropriate respect for its historic urban setting,” says Henry Cobb of Pei Cobb Freed & Partners.

Code of Context: The Uneasy Excitement of Global Practice

01:00 - 21 January, 2015
Safdie Architects. Marina Bay Sands. Singapore
Safdie Architects. Marina Bay Sands. Singapore

Global, the Winter 2014 issue of ArchitectureBoston magazine, out now, is an examination of the challenges and opportunities facing architects working abroad, from the Middle East to Africa to Asia. The topics explored in this issue include how to value resource-constrained approaches, honor local vernacular, and learn from the urbanization precedents set in other parts of the world. In this article, Jay Wickersham FAIA examines how in a globalized market, architecture firms can take steps to ensure that their designs act in the best interests of the foreign communities they affect.

The signs of architecture’s globalization are all around us. Foreign students flock to Boston to study architecture, prominent buildings are designed by foreign architects, American firms build practices around international projects. Globalization has allowed architects to work outside their own regions and cultures, at a scale and with a freedom of design they might never enjoy at home. But beneath the excitement and glamour of international practice, I sense an unease. Are we creating vital and original new architectures, or are we homogenizing cities and landscapes and obliterating regional differences? Are architects helping to strengthen and develop the economies of host communities, or are they acting as unwitting tools of inequality and repression?

Sasaki Associates. Technologico de Monterrey. Monterrey, Mexico Machado and Silvetti Associates. Vietnamese-German University. Binh Duong, Vietnam Kyu Sung Woo Architects KAIST IT Convergence Building Daejeon, Korea Höweler + Yoon Architecture. Sky Courts. Chengdu, China +18

Boston to Represent US in 2024 Olympic Bid

00:00 - 9 January, 2015
Courtesy of Team USA
Courtesy of Team USA

The US Olympic Committee (USOC) has unanimously selected Boston as its applicant city for the 2024 Olympic and Paralympic Games. The culmination of a 22-month evaluation process, Boston was selected over Los Angeles, Washington and San Francisco

“This bid uniquely combines an exciting, athlete-focused concept for hosting the Olympic and Paralympic Games with Boston’s existing long-term vision,” says USOC CEO Scott Blackmun. “We look forward to working with Mayor Walsh and the Boston 2024 team to fully engage with the local community and identify ways we can make the bid even better.”

House Renovation in Boston / Intadesign

01:00 - 5 January, 2015
© Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo
© Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo

© Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo © Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo © Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo © Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo +22

District Hall, Boston’s Public Innovation Center / Hacin + Associates

01:00 - 5 January, 2015
© Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo
© Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo
  • Architects

  • Location

    75 Northern Avenue, Boston, MA 02210, USA
  • Landscape Architect

    Reed Hilderbrand Associates, Inc
  • Hacin + Associates team

    David Hacin, President; Scott Thomson, Project Architect; Matthew Arnold, Project Manager; Nicole Fichera, Designer
  • Reed Hilderbrand Team

    Gary Hilderbrand, Principal; Chris Moyles, Principal/Project Manager; Ryan Wampler, Associate; Leslie Carter, Designer
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

© Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo © Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo © Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo © Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo +12

Interested in Becoming a Guest Curator for the Boston Society of Architects?

01:00 - 8 November, 2014
http://www.archdaily.com/209493/bsa-boston-society-of-architects-space-howeler-yoon-architecture/. Image © Andy Ryan
http://www.archdaily.com/209493/bsa-boston-society-of-architects-space-howeler-yoon-architecture/. Image © Andy Ryan

BSA Space, home to the Boston Society of Architects and the BSA Foundation, is currently accepting proposals from all designers interested in becoming a guest curator. The selected curator would be responsible for conceiving, fabricating, executing, and installing all aspects of a major exhibit within the BSA's 5,000 square foot gallery space. Proposals should take into consideration a diverse audience and seek to capture the imagination of the public by conveying the power of design as an instrument of change within Boston. All major exhibitions will run four to six months and guest curators will receive a budget of $30-70K. The deadline for submissions is Friday, November 14 at 4:00PM. More details can be found, here.

Call for Proposals: Boston Living with Water

01:00 - 8 November, 2014
Courtesy of Boston Living with Water
Courtesy of Boston Living with Water

The Boston Harbor Association, City of Boston, Boston Redevelopment Authority, and Boston Society of Architects have teamed up to launch Boston Living with Water, “an international call for design solutions envisioning a more resilient, more sustainable, and more beautiful Boston adapted for end-of-the-century climate conditions and rising sea levels.” The two-phase competition, open to all leading planners, designers and thinkers, will award the best overall proposal $20,000; the second and third best will each receive $10,000. Submissions for the first phase are due December 2, 2014. Learn more, here

ULI Releases New Report on the Infrastructural Challenges of Rising Sea Levels

00:00 - 2 November, 2014
Innovation District Harborwalk . Image Courtesy of ULI Boston
Innovation District Harborwalk . Image Courtesy of ULI Boston

The Urban Implications of Living With Water, a recent report by the Urban Land Institute (ULI) Boston, opens with the clear assertion: "We are beginning to feel the effects of climate change." The result of a conversation amongst over seventy experts from the fields of architecture, engineering, public policy, real estate and more, the report covers the proposed integrated solutions for a future of living in a city that proactively meets the challenges accompanying rising water levels.

"We accept that the seas are rising, the weather is changing, and our communities are at risk; and we recognize that no solution can be all-encompassing. It is our hope that this report will spark conversation, shift our understanding of what is possible, and aid us in reframing challenges into opportunities as we move toward this new era of development."

Become part of the discussion and read more about the collective ideas, after the break.

Get Swinging in Boston on these Glowing LED Hoops

00:00 - 21 September, 2014
© Höweler + Yoon Architecture
© Höweler + Yoon Architecture

In Boston, playgrounds are no longer just for kids. Twenty LED-lit circular swings have been installed outdoors as a part of "Swing Time," Boston's first interactive sculpture installation. The hanging, glowing orbs are a twist on traditional rubber-and-rope swings, dangling from a minimal steel structure similar to those used in conventional playgrounds. LED lights embedded in the swings activate and change color as each swing moves, returning to a dim white light when static. The piece is designed to blend Boston's design community with its expanding technology sector while playfully engaging residents. 

Take a seat in "Swing Time" with more photos and info after the break.

© Höweler + Yoon Architecture © Höweler + Yoon Architecture © Höweler + Yoon Architecture © Höweler + Yoon Architecture +17