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Tamás Bujnovszky

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K4 Office Building / 3h architecture

  • Architects: 3h architecture
  • Location: Budapest, Hungary
  • Design Team: Andras Mark Bartha, Zsombor Feher, Lilla Kantor, Bence Kertesz, Anna Sara Kiss, Tamas Nemeth, Orsolya Pataj
  • Design Architects: Katalin Csillag, Zsolt Gunther
  • Project Architect: Tamas Bekesi
  • Area: 23330.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2015
  • Photographs: Tamas Bujnovszky

© Tamas Bujnovszky © Tamas Bujnovszky © Tamas Bujnovszky © Tamas Bujnovszky

Why Budapest's Contemporary Architects had to Go Underground to Find Success

This article by ArchDaily's former managing editor Vanessa Quirk first appeared on ArtsCultureBeat, the web magazine of Arts & Culture concentration at Columbia Journalism School’s MA program, titled "The Secret Life of Hungarian Contemporary Architecture."

This time last year, Hungarian Prime Minister Victor Orbán stood at a podium in a pristine new subway station. Raw concrete beams criss-crossed above him; state-of-the art, driverless trains stood silently beside him. It was the opening ceremony for Line 4, a subway line that due to delays, corruption, and disputes had been 40 years in the making.

“The people of Budapest began to accept the thought that only their grandchildren would use Budapest’s new Metro line, or not even them.” Orbán told the crowd. He recounted an old joke that embodied the cynicism that once surrounded the project: Chuck Norris had been on Metro Line 4.

Orbán credited the line’s completion, which occurred only a few weeks before the 2014 parliamentary elections, to “the solidarity and unity that was established in 2010 [when Orbán’s government took power] and has since been maintained.” He didn’t mention how, under his first government (1998 to 2002), he had withheld funds from the project, contributing significantly to its delay. Nor did he mention that his party had fought against the idea that the line, an expensive infrastructural project, needed architecture at all.

Today, though, the line’s stunning architecture is its most noticeable feature. Line 4 is not just a watershed achievement in Hungary’s history, but also a symbol of what it takes to make contemporary architecture in Hungary today. Both literally and figuratively, contemporary architecture had to go underground.

Fovam Station / sporaarchitects. Image © Tamás Bujnovszky Gellert Station / sporaarchitects. Image © Tamás Bujnovszky Kálvin tér Station / PALATIUM Studio. Image © Tamás Bujnovszky Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio. Image © Tamás Bujnovszky

Playing with Balance and the Balance of Play: Hello Wood's 2014 Camp

A shortened version of this article by ArchDaily's Managing Editor Rory Stott appears in HW 1-5, a book by the organizers of Hello Wood about the camp's first five years.

Arriving at Budapest’s international airport on a warm Saturday in July, I confess to being unprepared for my week ahead at Hello Wood 2014. Hungary was the third country and Budapest the fourth city I had been in in 72 hours, and thanks to this (uncharacteristically) chaotic week, I hadn’t had the chance to research anything about the camp. All I knew was what could be learned from the photos of the 2013 camp which I had published almost a year earlier: that is, that the camp is held in an idyllic rural setting, presumably a significant distance from Budapest; and that the quality of work seems unusually high for a week-long architecture workshop, presumably indicating a serious, focused atmosphere at the camp.

The first of these assumptions was absolutely right. But the second could hardly be more wrong. In fact the atmosphere at the camp was so far from being serious that by Tuesday, Gábor Betegh - a friend of the organizers and coincidentally Cambridge University’s new Laurence Professor of Ancient Philosophy - told me how fascinating it was to compare the “centripetal madness” of the philosophers he knows to the “very centrifugal madness” of the architects at the camp. This remark was made in response to one of the team leaders screeching like a monkey from the top of his team’s half-completed tower.

© Géza Talabér © Anna Vághy Playground / Architecture Uncomfortable Workshop. Image © Géza Talabér © Géza Talabér

Doboz Bar / Péter Szendrő

  • Architects: Péter Szendrő
  • Location: Budapest, Klauzál utca 10, 1072 Hungary
  • Collaborators: Dávid Loszmann, Gábor Korintus, Kristóf Pataricza
  • Area: 492.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2011
  • Photographs: Dániel Dömölky, Zsolt Batár, Tamas Bujnovszky

© Zsolt Batár © Dániel Dömölky © Tamas Bujnovszky © Zsolt Batár

New Visitor Entrance, Benedictine Archabbey Of Pannonhalma / CZITA Architects

  • Architects: CZITA Architects
  • Location: Pannonhalma, Hungary
  • Architects In Charge: Tamás Czigány, Anikó Páll, Györgyi Tóth
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Tamás Bujnovszky, Tamás Czigány

© Tamás Czigány © Tamás Czigány © Tamás Czigány © Tamás Bujnovszky

The 14 Stories Behind the 2015 Building of the Year Award Winners

With our annual Building of the Year Awards, over 30,000 readers narrowed down over 3,000 projects, selecting just 14 as the best examples of architecture that ArchDaily has published in the past year. The results have been celebrated and widely shared, of course, usually in the form of images of each project. But what is often forgotten in this flurry of image sharing is that every one of these 14 projects has a backstory of significance which adds to our understanding of their architectural quality.

Some of these projects are intelligent responses to pressing social issues, others are twists on a well-established typology. Others still are simply supreme examples of architectural dexterity. In order that we don't forget the tremendous amount of effort that goes into creating each of these architectural masterpieces, continue reading after the break for the 14 stories that defined this year's Building of the Year Awards.

Budapest Underground Line M4 - Bikás Park Station / PALATIUM Studio

  • Architects: PALATIUM Studio
  • Location: Budapest, Tétényi Way, Hungary
  • Architects In Charge: Zoltán Erő, Balázs Csapó, Dóra Brückner, Zsolt Kosztolányi, Máté Antal
  • Area: 6180.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Tamás Bujnovszky

© Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky

Budapest Underground Line M4 - Kálvin tér Station / PALATIUM Studio

  • Architects: PALATIUM Studio
  • Location: Budapest, Kálvin tér, 1092 Hungary
  • Architects In Charge: Zoltán Erő, Balázs Csapó, Dóra Brückner, Zsolt Kosztolányi, Máté Antal
  • Area: 6900.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Tamás Bujnovszky

© Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky

Benedetta Tagliabue Among Budapest Design Week's Special Guests

Featuring around 220 events spread out over 10 days, Budapest Design Week kicks off its 11th year on October 3rd. With exhibitions, workshops, lectures and a range of other events spread across all design disciplines, the program will suit all tastes - however, perhaps the highlight for architects will be the presence of Benedetta Tagliabue, Principle of EMBT, who will give a lecture on "Blending and Experimentation" on October 8th.

Read on after the break for more on Budapest Design Week.

Twin Stations / sporaarchitects

  • Architects: sporaarchitects
  • Location: Budapest, Hungary
  • Architects In Charge: Tibor Dékány, Sándor Finta, Ádám Hatvani, Orsolya Vadász
  • Design Team: Zsuzsa Balogh, Attila Korompay project architects, Bence Várhidi, Noémi Soltész, András Jánosi, Diána Molnár, Károly Stefkó
  • Area: 7100.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Tamás Bujnovszky

Fovam Station. Image © Tamás Bujnovszky Fovam Station. Image © Tamás Bujnovszky Gellert Station. Image © Tamás Bujnovszky Gellert Station. Image © Tamás Bujnovszky

Kocka Bar / MINUSPLUS

  • Architects: MINUSPLUS
  • Location: Budapest, Kazinczy Street 48, 1075 Hungary
  • Architect In Charge: Zsolt Alexa, Donát Rabb, Ákos Schreck, Ferenc Kis, Tímea Molnár, Szabina Pap, Balázs Turai
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Tamás Bujnovszky, Bertalan Soós

© Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky

Sauflon Centre of Innovation / Foldes Architects

© Tamas Bujnovszky © Tamas Bujnovszky © Tamas Bujnovszky © Tamas Bujnovszky

Wicker Man: An Interview with Salvador Gilabert of EMBT

As one of EMBT's Directors, Salvador Gilabert has helped guide the realization of some of the practice's biggest projects in recent years – including as project director of Spain's 2010 Shanghai Expo Pavilion and the recently completed Barajas Social Housing Block.

Last month, he took a week out of his schedule to lead a project at Hello Wood, where – with an energy and intensity that was almost out of place in the relaxing surroundings of the Hungarian countryside – he led a group of students to construct an ambitious, screw-free elevated platform that emerged from a cluster of trees and offered views of the setting sun. ArchDaily caught up with Salvador Gilabert during the week to find out more about his work.

Read on after the break for the full interview

Barajas Social Housing Blocks / EMBT. Image © Roland Halbe "Labyrinth," the project led by Gilabert at Hello Wood. Image © Tamás Bujnovszky "Labyrinth," the project led by Gilabert at Hello Wood. Image © Tamás Bujnovszky The Spanish Pavilion at the 2010 Shanghai Expo

Hello Wood 2014 Invites Student Teams to 'Play With Balance'

Set in the bucolic fields of Csórompuszta in the Hungarian countryside, the annual Hello Wood camp was recently back for its fifth year. Every year, students have one week to create wooden installations under the instruction of specially selected tutors, each of whom provide an outline idea of a project in response to a theme. This time around the challenge from the organizers was to "play with balance," which generated ideas that investigated the balance between opposing concepts - but also generated a whole lot of play, too. See all 14 of the weird and wonderful results after the break.

© Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky

Nagyerdo Football Stadium / BORD

© Tibor Olah
© Tibor Olah
  • Architects: BORD
  • Location: Debrecen, Hungary
  • Architect In Charge: Peter Bordas
  • Co Ordinating Architect: Robert Benke
  • Design Team: Robert Gulyas, Gabriella Gaspar, Annamaria Holovits, Tamas Mezey, Timea Szabo, Julia Szendroi,Tamas Tolvaj, Annamaria Toth, Kata Zih
  • Area: 7000.0 sqm
  • Project Year: 2014
  • Photographs: Tibor Olah, Tamas Bujnovszky

© Tibor Olah © Tamas Bujnovszky © Tamas Bujnovszky © Tamas Bujnovszky

Hideg House / Béres Architects

  • Architects: Béres Architects
  • Location: Koszeg, Hungary
  • Architect In Charge: Attila BÈres, Jusztina Bal•zs
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Tamás Bujnovszky

© Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky

Esterházy Etyeki Kúria Winery / BORD Architectural Studio

© Tamás Bujnovszky
© Tamás Bujnovszky
  • Architects: BORD Architectural Studio
  • Location: Öreghegy, Hungary
  • Head Architects: Péter Bordás
  • Assistant Architects: Róbert Benke, Annamária Holovits, Ildikó Pém, Júlia Szendrői, Tamás Tolvaj
  • Project Year: 2013
  • Photographs: Tamás Bujnovszky, Duong Li Eszter

© Duong Li Eszter © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky © Tamás Bujnovszky