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Confórmi: How Visual References Echo Through the Ages

04:00 - 27 February, 2017
Confórmi: How Visual References Echo Through the Ages, Alvaro Siza Vieira, Wohnhaus Schlesisches Tor (Bonjour Tristesse), Berlin, 1980-1984 — Alvar Aalto, MIT Baker House Dormitory, Cambridge, MA, USA, 1947-1948. Image © Davide Trabucco
Alvaro Siza Vieira, Wohnhaus Schlesisches Tor (Bonjour Tristesse), Berlin, 1980-1984 — Alvar Aalto, MIT Baker House Dormitory, Cambridge, MA, USA, 1947-1948. Image © Davide Trabucco

Confórmi (also on Instagram) is a project which began two years ago as a way to manage its curator's visual references. Bologna-based Davide Trabucco, the curator in question, describes the archive as "a personal work-instrument" that positions apparently dichotic elements into a visual relationship with each other. All of these images, Trabucco believes, "are already present in our collective imagery and in visual culture." Their visual impact is clear: formally and aesthetically, each visual pairing "is immediately understandable – even to the uninitiated."

Alvar Aalto, Silo, Toppila | Oulu, Finland, 1931 — Herzog & De Meuron, Feltrinelli Porta Volta, Milano, Italy, 2008-2016. Image © Davide Trabucco Ludwig Mies Van Der Rohe, Bürohaus Friedrichstraße, Berlin, 1929 — Herzog & De Meuron, Elbphilharmonie, Hamburg, 2003-2016. Image © Davide Trabucco Louis Kahn, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California, USA, 1959-1965 — Bas Princen, Ringroad (Ceuta-Fnideq), 2007. Image © Davide Trabucco Le Corbusier, Tower of Shadows, Chandigarh, India, 1957 — “Ecomostro” | Blot on the Landscape, Ostuni, Italy, 1980. Image © Davide Trabucco +19

Introducing GSAPP Conversations' Inaugural Episode: "Exhibition Models"

08:30 - 24 February, 2017
Introducing GSAPP Conversations' Inaugural Episode: "Exhibition Models"

We are pleased to announce a new content partnership between ArchDaily and Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation (GSAPP) in New York City.

GSAPP Conversations is a podcast series designed to offer a window onto the expanding field of contemporary architectural practice. Each episode pivots around discussions on current projects, research, and obsessions of a diverse group of invited guests at Columbia, from both emerging and well-established practices. Usually hosted by the Dean of the GSAPP, Amale Andraos, the conversations also feature the school’s influential faculty and alumni and give students the opportunity to engage architects on issues of concern to the next generation.

Instagram's Newest Feature Allows You to Make a Photoset of Your Favorite Buildings

14:00 - 23 February, 2017

Architecture lovers, rejoice! First, there was the zoom feature that we all love, now Instagram has rolled out a new feature that will make documenting and sharing your favorite buildings even easier. Just released this week, the update to the iOS app will now allow you to create photosets (with videos included) in one single post.

2.8 Million-square-foot Apple Campus to Open in April... And It Looks Incredible

10:30 - 22 February, 2017

Apple today announced that Apple Park (also referred to as Apple Campus 2) will be ready to occupy beginning in April. Envisioned by Steve Jobs as a “center for creativity and collaboration,” the 175-acre campus will serve as a new home for more than 12,000 employees, who will be moved-in over a six month period. Construction on outer buildings and park spaces will continue through the summer.

© Apple © Apple © Apple © Apple via screenshot from video +6

Paper Models of the Most Controversial Buildings Erected Behind the Iron Curtain

07:50 - 22 February, 2017
Paper Models of the Most Controversial Buildings Erected Behind the Iron Curtain, Brutal East. Image Courtesy of Zupagrafika
Brutal East. Image Courtesy of Zupagrafika

Zupagrafika, creators of make-your-own-paper-model sets of "brut-iful" architecture in London, Paris, Warsaw, and Katowice, have released their newest set, Brutal East

The creators' selection captures the "certainly brutal" charm of the "functionalist panelák estates and otherworldly concrete grand designs" of the Eastern Bloc. With Brutal East you can build your own...

Francis Kéré to Design 2017 Serpentine Pavilion

07:30 - 21 February, 2017
Francis Kéré to Design 2017 Serpentine Pavilion, Serpentine Pavilion 2017, Designed by Francis Kéré, Design Render, Interior. Image © Kéré Architecture
Serpentine Pavilion 2017, Designed by Francis Kéré, Design Render, Interior. Image © Kéré Architecture

The Serpentine Galleries have announced that the 2017 Serpentine Pavilion will be designed by Diébédo Francis Kéré (Kéré Architecture), an African architect based between Berlin, Germany, and his home town of Gando in Burkino Faso. The design for the proposal, which will be built this summer in London's Kensington Gardens, comprises an expansive roof supported by a steel frame, mimicking the canopy of a tree. According to Kéré, the design for the roof stems from a tree that serves as the central meeting point for life in Gando. In line with the criteria for the selection of the Serpentine Pavilion architect Kéré has yet to have realised a permanent building in England.

Louis Kahn's Indian Institute of Management in Ahmedabad Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

14:00 - 20 February, 2017
Louis Kahn's Indian Institute of Management in Ahmedabad Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

In celebration of the life of Louis Kahn, who would have celebrated his birthday on this day, photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has visited the Indian Institute of Management in Ahmedabad – one of the architect's seminal projects, which was only completed after his death in 1974.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +46

80 at 80 Exhibition to Celebrate the Architectural Career of Sir Peter Cook

12:00 - 17 February, 2017
Courtesy of Bartlett School of Architecture
Courtesy of Bartlett School of Architecture

The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, is celebrating the opening of its new building at 22 Gordon Street with an exhibition of work by visionary architect Sir Peter Cook. Running from 23 February to 10 March 2017, the exhibition marks Sir Peter’s 80th year with a celebration of 80 of his inspired and pioneering projects.

How Architects Realized the Curving, Twisted, Slanted Walls in Toyo Ito's Mexican Museum

06:00 - 17 February, 2017
How Architects Realized the Curving, Twisted, Slanted Walls in Toyo Ito's Mexican Museum, © Patrick Lopez Jaimes / Danstek
© Patrick Lopez Jaimes / Danstek

This article is part of our 'Innovative Materials' series where we ask architects about the creative process behind choosing the materials they use in their work.

The Museo Internacional del Barroco (International Baroque Museum) by Toyo Ito is located 7km from Puebla, Mexico. The place is noted for its easy access, not only for cars, but also for being connected to a network of bike paths and public transport. In this interview we spoke with Alejandro Bribiesca Ortega and Miriam Carrada.

Free Resume Templates for Architects

16:00 - 16 February, 2017
Free Resume Templates for Architects

What's a better way to follow up on one of our most popular posts (of all time) than by providing a key design tool: the mighty template. Many of you enjoyed seeing the examples of CVs and resumes submitted by ArchDaily readers, but you also asked for a simple, fast way to jump start inspiration for your own creations. 

Here are five hand-picked, well-organized, easy-to-use templates that have been downloaded and tested by our team of editors. 

Italo Calvino's 'Invisible Cities', Illustrated (Again)

04:00 - 16 February, 2017
Italo Calvino's 'Invisible Cities', Illustrated (Again), Zobeida. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen
Zobeida. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen

Lima-based architect Karina Puente has a personal project: to illustrate each and every "invisible" city from Italo Calvino's 1972 novel. Her initial collection, which ArchDaily published in 2016, traced Cities and Memories. This latest series of mixed media collages, drawn mainly using ink on paper, brings together another sequence of imagined places – each referencing a city imagined in the book.

Invisible Cities, which imagines fictional conversations between the (real-life) Venetian explorer Marco Polo and the aged Mongol ruler Kublai Khan, has been instrumental in framing approaches to urban discourse and the form of the city. According to Puente, "each illustration has a conceptual process, some of which take more time than others." Usually "I research, think, and ideate over each city for three weeks before making sketches." The final drawings and cut-outs take around a week to produce.

Zaira. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen Diomira. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen Dorotea. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen Fedora. Image © Karina Puente Frantzen +16

BIG Selected to Design San Pellegrino Factory and Headquarters in Northern Italy

08:10 - 15 February, 2017
BIG Selected to Design San Pellegrino Factory and Headquarters in Northern Italy, © BIG
© BIG

Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) have been revealed as the winners of a competition to conceptualize and design a new headquarters and bottling plant for San Pellegrino, located in the terme of the same name in the Alps of northern Italy. Finalists included MVRDV, Snøhetta, and aMDL, each of whom presented their proposals in October last year.

© BIG © BIG © BIG © BIG +49

Norbert Juhász's Portrait of Moroccan Berber Settlements

16:00 - 14 February, 2017
Norbert Juhász's Portrait of Moroccan Berber Settlements, © Norbert Juhász
© Norbert Juhász

In this photo-essay, Norbert Juhász—a Hungarian photographer based in Budapest—presents a study of the Moroccan Berber villages (around Imlil and the surrounding valleys). Located in the High Atlas Mountains, these remote settlements are increasingly connected to the "outside world." In the words of Juhász, "many are now connected to the electrical grid and have some sort of road access." That said, "mules are still a popular form of transport."

© Norbert Juhász © Norbert Juhász © Norbert Juhász © Norbert Juhász +10

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners Tipped to Extend London's Iconic British Library Complex

08:05 - 14 February, 2017
Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners Tipped to Extend London's Iconic British Library Complex, Courtesy of British Library
Courtesy of British Library

As reported by the Architects' Journal, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP)—the London-based practice led by Richard Rogers—have been selected, "following a developer-led competition," to expand the iconic British Library complex in London – designed by Colin St. John Wilson in 1962 and eventually completed in 1997. The national library is widely considered to be the largest public building ever constructed in the United Kingdom over the course of the 20th Century. In 2015, the buildings were awarded the highest level of Listed (protection) status.

105 Valentines for Architects (And Architecture Lovers)

07:00 - 13 February, 2017

If there was ever a time when the world needed a bit of extra love, that time is now. And even though Valentine's Day is a celebration of romantic love, we know these uplifting messages of affection will resonate with peers, friends, and family members, alike. 

ArchDaily's mission is to improve the quality of life of the world's inhabitants by publishing content for architects, designers, and decision-makers. We also realize how important tolerance, acceptance, and love are to the process of building a better world. So, from us to you, and from your fellow readers to the world, may you feel a wealth of love on this Valentine's Day.

Gif submitted by Vilma Picari

8 Projects Announced as Winners of 2017 Archiprix International / Hunter Douglas Awards

13:05 - 10 February, 2017
8 Projects Announced as Winners of 2017 Archiprix International / Hunter Douglas Awards, Courtesy of Archiprix International / Hunter Douglas Awards 2017
Courtesy of Archiprix International / Hunter Douglas Awards 2017

After announcing its 23 finalists in November 2016, the Archiprix International / Hunter Douglas Awards 2017 have selected 8 winning projects, which were announced on Friday, February 10 at the CEPT University Campus in Ahmedabad, India. Now in its 9th edition, Archiprix International is a biennial event which showcases the best graduation projects of students from all over the globe in Architecture, Urban Design and Landscape Architecture. 

Coming from Australia, Austria, Chile, the United States, New Zealand, Poland and Singapore, the winners are:

Why We're Removing Our Comments Section

08:15 - 9 February, 2017
Why We're Removing Our Comments Section

In both of ArchDaily's last two major website redesigns, one idea was central to our thinking: Mies van der Rohe's aphorism "less is more." These redesigns added new features, sure - but more importantly, they identified extraneous features on the site and removed them. Today, on February 9th 2017, we are removing one more feature that we no longer believe to be necessary on ArchDaily: comments on certain articles.

All comments previously left on our articles will still be visible, preserving the many positive contributions left by our readers over the years. But from today, we will be gradually shifting the discussion to social media, leaving comments open only on News and Editorial articles while the option to comment on Projects, Events, Competitions and Publications articles will be removed. Instead, we encourage readers to take part in the discussions happening on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, or to get in touch through our contact form for direct feedback or substantive comments about our articles. Read on to understand the reasons behind our decision.

Winners of the 2017 Building of the Year Awards

07:00 - 9 February, 2017
Winners of the 2017 Building of the Year Awards

With two weeks of nominations and voting now complete, we are happy to present the winners of the 2017 ArchDaily Building of the Year Awards. As a peer-based, crowdsourced architecture award, these winners were chosen by the collective intelligence of over 75,000 votes from ArchDaily readers around the world, filtering over 3,000 projects down to the 16 best works featured on ArchDaily in 2016.

The winners, as always, include a diversity of architectural output from around the globe. Alongside high-profile, perhaps even predictable winners—who would have bet against BIG's first completed project in New York or Herzog & de Meuron's long-awaited philharmonic hall in Hamburg?—are more niche and surprise winners, from Nicolás Campodonico's off-grid chapel in Argentina to ARCHSTUDIO's organic food factory in China. The list also features some returning favorites such as spaceworkers, whose Casa Cabo de Vila brings them their second win in the housing category, repeating their success from 2015.

In being published on ArchDaily, these 16 exemplary buildings have helped us to continue our mission, bringing inspiration, knowledge, and tools to architects around the world. This award wouldn't be possible without the hundreds of firms that choose to publish their projects with ArchDaily every year, or without those who take part in the voting process to become part of our thousands-strong awards jury. To everyone who took part—either by submitting a project in the past year, or by nominating and voting for candidates in the past weeks—thank you for giving strength to this award. And of course, congratulations to all the winners!

Read on to see the full list of winning projects.