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How to Adopt BIM: 3 Ways to Approach Your Firm’s Pilot Project

09:30 - 25 June, 2016
How to Adopt BIM: 3 Ways to Approach Your Firm’s Pilot Project, Courtesy of Autodesk
Courtesy of Autodesk

These days, BIM is becoming standard practice. Most people involved in the construction sector—from the architects and engineers who use BIM to the governments that are implementing mandates for BIM in certain project types—are well and truly sold on the benefits it brings, including efficiency, collaboration, cost-savings, and improved communication. As a result, many practices these days that haven’t yet switched to BIM give the same reason: the dreaded transitional period.

Of course, these fears of transition are not entirely unfounded, as new software, staff training and teething problems are an inevitable part of upending your existing workflow. These initial costs create a barrier for many busy practices who simply can’t afford the time or money right now that would enable them to unlock BIM’s benefits down the line. The key to solving this conundrum of course is to minimize the initial costs—and one way of doing this that many experts recommend is to start your firm’s transition to BIM with a single pilot project, in which you will be able to establish a workflow and define standards that suit your practice, and transfer these lessons onto later projects.

But what is the best way to select this pilot project? Should you work on a large or small building? A complex work or a simple one? Here, three early adopters of BIM share what they learned from their own pilot projects, each with very different characteristics.

Monocle 24's 'Section D' Reports from 2016 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 24 June, 2016

In the latest edition of Section DMonocle 24's weekly review of design, architecture and craft, Chiara Rimella reports from the Veneto in northern Italy for a report on the best at the 15th International Architecture Biennale – La Biennale di Venezia. Covering Aravena's central exhibitions, Reporting From the Front, and the designers and curators of the 61 national pavilions, the show seeks to understand how architecture can tackle some of the pressing social and political concerns of our time.

AMO's Stratified Scenography for Prada's 2017 S/S Collection is Presented as "Total Space"

12:30 - 20 June, 2016
AMO's Stratified Scenography for Prada's 2017 S/S Collection is Presented as "Total Space", © Agostino Osio
© Agostino Osio

In the latest scenographic set for Prada's fashion collections, AMO have created a set "conceived as a stratification of architectures" – Total Space. Remnants from previous shows sit around the periphery of the room creating a foundation and aesthetic background for the house's 2017 Spring/Summer collection. A linear structure, which sits centrally and divides the room, is designed to "amplify its perceived proportions."

© Agostino Osio © Agostino Osio © Agostino Osio © Alberto Moncada +9

Project of the Month: San Bernardo Chapel

17:00 - 13 June, 2016

Stereotomic architecture is characterized by two strong themes: the continuity of the forces of gravity to the ground, into the soil; and the search for natural light, which drills through the massive, solid walls to illuminate and allow habitation by the human being. It’s from these themes that this project takes its power.

Courtesy of Nicolás Campodónico
Courtesy of Nicolás Campodónico

Today we present to you May’s Project of the Month, the San Bernardo Chapel, which in its search to transform ecclesiastic symbolism uses nature as a way of ritual expression. The client required a place in a remote location that accommodated religious acts and rituals, in a context in which time is reflected by the use of recycled materials—materials that have been a part of the place for more than 100 years. This established construction criteria based on ancient masonry techniques. However, the project also involved the use of new materials in the interior of the work, creating an interesting play of textures.

Norman Foster on the Boeing 747 "Jumbo Jet"

07:00 - 10 June, 2016
Norman Foster on the Boeing 747 "Jumbo Jet", The first public display of the Boeing 747 (30 September 1968). Image © SAS Scandinavian Airlines
The first public display of the Boeing 747 (30 September 1968). Image © SAS Scandinavian Airlines

In an article for Reading Design, Norman Foster—a passionate aeronaut—describes how the groundbreaking design of the Boeing 747 "Jumbo Jet," the iconic airplane envisioned by engineer Joseph "Joe" Sutter in the 1960s, remains timeless. Likening both its method of construction and means of operation to that of a typical building, Foster asserts that it speaks of "the international hotel style," which he supposes as appropriate: "people come and go, it does not have a great deal of character and it could be almost anywhere."

ArchDaily Launches Top 100 Projects

16:17 - 9 June, 2016
ArchDaily Launches Top 100 Projects

This year ArchDaily celebrates 10 years since it was first launched in Spanish as Plataforma Arquitectura. To commemorate, we sorted through the thousands of projects that have been published over the years to highlight those that represented a milestone for their time.

We also reviewed the most popular projects from each one of our sites – those that our readers highlighted through their many visits. Afterwards, we asked each one of the architects to send along additional material for their project, taking advantage of new technologies that exist and that can help our readers better understand the works.

The compilation of this material allows us to present our selection of the Top 100 Projects. These 100 projects make up a list of interesting case studies and references for millions of architects, students and specialists who are in search of the most important and inspiring projects from around the world. This section will have greater visibility on our site, exponentially increasing the global impact and opportunities that these projects can create.

NLÉ's Makoko Floating School Reportedly Collapses Due to Heavy Rain

18:11 - 7 June, 2016
NLÉ's Makoko Floating School Reportedly Collapses Due to Heavy Rain, via NAIJ.com
via NAIJ.com

As reported by Nigerian news website NAIJ.com, the celebrated Makoko Floating School, designed by Nigerian architect Kunlé Adeyemi of NLÉ, has collapsed after heavy rain battered the city of Lagos. Photographs show the roof of the school still largely in tact, but sitting directly on top of the building's floating base of 256 plastic drums, as the lower levels and supporting structure appear to have failed completely.

This article has since been updated (June 8 2016) with a statement from NLÉ.

Prospect North: Inside Scotland's Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

08:00 - 7 June, 2016
Prospect North: Inside Scotland's Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale , Courtesy of Dualchas Architects
Courtesy of Dualchas Architects

As part of ArchDaily's coverage of the 2016 Venice Biennale, we are presenting a series of articles written by the curators of the exhibitions and installations on show.

People wearing the huge sculptural head of a unicorn has become one of the most surreal images to be seen at this year’s  15th Venice Architectural Biennale.

Part of the Prospect North exhibition at the Scottish Pavilion, which is jointly produced by Lateral NorthDualchas Architects and Soluis, a design-visualization studio from Glasgow, the heads of the unicorn, moose and polar bear allows you to enter an immersive virtual reality world of the Highlands past, present and future.

Courtesy of Dualchas Architects Courtesy of Dualchas Architects Courtesy of Dualchas Architects Courtesy of Dualchas Architects +11

Introducing Volume #48: The Research Turn

04:00 - 7 June, 2016
Introducing Volume #48: The Research Turn, © Volume
© Volume

Volume #48: The Research Turn is comprised entirely of interviews and conversations. We wanted to learn from those who have been instrumental in shifting the boundaries and shaping today’s landscape of creative knowledge production. The issue also includes the catalogue for BLUE: Architecture of UN Peacekeeping Missions by Malkit Shoshan, the Dutch contribution to the 15th Venice Architecture Biennale.

Over the coming weeks Volume will share a curated selection of essays from this issue on ArchDaily. This represents the continuation of a partnership between two platforms with global agendas: in the case of ArchDaily to provide inspiration, knowledge and tools to architects across the world and, in the case of Volume, "to voice architecture any way, anywhere, anytime [by] represent[ing] the expansion of architectural territories and the new mandate for design."

12 Things You Need to See at the 2016 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 6 June, 2016
"Reporting From the Front". Image © Italo Rondinella
"Reporting From the Front". Image © Italo Rondinella

There is an enormous intensity of information, knowledge and ideas on display at this year's Venice Architecture Biennale, Reporting From the Front. With all the Executive Editors and Editors-in-Chief of ArchDaily's platforms in English, Spanish and (Brazilian) Portuguese in Venice for the opening of the 2016 Venice Architecture Biennale—plus co-founder David Basulto and European Editor-at-Large James Taylor-Foster, who curated this year's Nordic Pavilion—we've pooled together twelve of our initial favourite exhibitions and must-see shows.

Against The Tide: Inside Chile's Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

12:00 - 5 June, 2016
Against The Tide: Inside Chile's Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale, Courtesy of Consejo Nacional de la Cultura y las Artes
Courtesy of Consejo Nacional de la Cultura y las Artes

As part of ArchDaily's coverage of the 2016 Venice Biennale, we are presenting a series of articles written by the curators of the exhibitions and installations on show.

Against the tide presents the efforts of a generation of young architects who have conceived, designed, and constructed works of architecture, while also arranging their financial and contractual aspects as part of the requirements for their professional degree in architecture. All they have in common is that they belong to the Central Valley of Chile, where they have returned following their academic training to contribute to their communities, creating architectural projects which connect to a set of places where the region’s campesinos and their families can live and work.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu Courtesy of Consejo Nacional de la Cultura y las Artes © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +15

AD Interviews: Golden Lion Winners Iñaqui Carnicero & Carlos Quintáns / 2016 Venice Biennale

11:00 - 4 June, 2016

At the opening of the 2016 Venice Biennale, ArchDaily and PLANE—SITE had the unique opportunity to interview Carlos Quintáns & Iñaqui Carnicero and ask them about "UNFINISHED"—an exhibition that uncovers design strategies that take an optimistic view of the built environment. This idea of exhibiting architecture that revels in the patina acquired through the passage of time and that shows how architects have learned from Spain's recent economic crisis earned the Pavilion the Golden Lion for Best National Participation. The jury cited Quintáns & Carnicero's "concisely curated selection of emerging architects whose work shows how creativity and commitment can transcend material constraints."

To see the video with subtitles, make sure that the "CC" button is selected.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +9

BLUE: Architecture of UN Peacekeeping Missions: Inside the Netherlands' Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

07:00 - 31 May, 2016

As part of ArchDaily's coverage of the 2016 Venice Biennale, we are presenting a series of articles written by the curators of the exhibitions and installations on show.

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, and increasingly since 9/11 and the “War on Terror” that followed, warfare has moved into the city.

While the wars of the 20th century were waged largely between nations, over territorial sovereignty and along disputed borders, the wars of the 21st century are internal and borderless. They are fought between large multinational coalitions and insurgent networks.

BLUE: Architecture of Peacekeeping Missions. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu BLUE: Architecture of Peacekeeping Missions. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu BLUE: Architecture of Peacekeeping Missions. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu BLUE: Architecture of Peacekeeping Missions. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu +14

Selfie Automaton: Inside Romania's Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

21:00 - 30 May, 2016
Selfie Automaton: Inside Romania's Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale, SELFIE AUTOMATON / curated by Tiberiu Bucșa, Gál Orsolya, Stathis Markopoulos, Adrian Aramă, Oana Matei, Andrei Durloi. Romanian Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
SELFIE AUTOMATON / curated by Tiberiu Bucșa, Gál Orsolya, Stathis Markopoulos, Adrian Aramă, Oana Matei, Andrei Durloi. Romanian Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

As part of ArchDaily's coverage of the 2016 Venice Biennale, we are presenting a series of articles written by the curators of the exhibitions and installations on show.

The Romanian Pavilion at the 15th International Architecture Exhibition — La Biennale di Venezia showcases “Selfie Automaton”, an exhibition by Tiberiu Bucșa, Gál Orsolya, Stathis Markopoulos, Adrian Aramă, Oana Matei, Andrei Durloi. The exhibition consists of 7 mechanical automata, featuring 42 built in marionetes — 37 human and 5 creatures. Three of the automata will be placed in the Romanian Pavilion in Giardini, another three in the New Gallery of the Romanian Institute of Culture and Humanistic Research, and one nomad that will wander through the streets of Venice.

SELFIE AUTOMATON / curated by Tiberiu Bucșa, Gál Orsolya, Stathis Markopoulos, Adrian Aramă, Oana Matei, Andrei Durloi. Romanian Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu SELFIE AUTOMATON / curated by Tiberiu Bucșa, Gál Orsolya, Stathis Markopoulos, Adrian Aramă, Oana Matei, Andrei Durloi. Romanian Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu SELFIE AUTOMATON / curated by Tiberiu Bucșa, Gál Orsolya, Stathis Markopoulos, Adrian Aramă, Oana Matei, Andrei Durloi. Romanian Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu SELFIE AUTOMATON / curated by Tiberiu Bucșa, Gál Orsolya, Stathis Markopoulos, Adrian Aramă, Oana Matei, Andrei Durloi. Romanian Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu +20

Venice Biennale 2016 Winners: Spain, Japan, Peru, NLÉ & Gabinete de Arquitectura

05:49 - 28 May, 2016
Venice Biennale 2016 Winners: Spain, Japan, Peru, NLÉ & Gabinete de Arquitectura , UNFINISHED / curated by Carlos Quintáns & Iñaqui Carnicero. Spanish Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
UNFINISHED / curated by Carlos Quintáns & Iñaqui Carnicero. Spanish Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

Alejandro Aravena and the jury for the 15th International Architecture Exhibition at La Biennale di Venezia have just announced the winning participations.

The Golden Lion for Best National Participation went to Spain for UNFINISHED. The jury cited Carlos Quintáns & Iñaqui Carnicero's "concisely curated selection of emerging architects whose work shows how creativity and commitment can transcend material constraints."

Gabinete de Arquitectura. Image © Pola Mora NLÉ accepts their Silver Lion for a Promising Young Participant in the International Exhibition "Reporting from the Front". Image © Pola Mora Paulo Mendes da Rocha receives his Golden Lion for Lifetime Achievement. Image © Pola Mora Iñaqui Carnicero & Carlos Quintáns with their Golden Lion.. Image © Pola Mora +15

First Look: "Reporting from the Front" Arsenale Exhibition

13:01 - 26 May, 2016

"Architecture is about giving form to the places where we live. It is not more complicated than that, but also not easier than that." - Alejandro Aravena

On the first day of the vernissage 15th International Architecture Exhibition at La Biennale di Venezia, ArchDaily is pleased to show you a preview of the exhibitions and installations that were hand selected by Alejandro Aravena and his firm Elemental. Separate from (but in dialogue with) the National Pavilions, "Reporting From the Front" celebrates work that "address[es] a problem that matters and for which quality architecture made a difference."

In an exhibition whose aim is to share the "success stories" where architecture is making a difference, Alejandro Aravena has convened offices and practitioners from across the globe to show—"in the simplest possible terms (without trivializing)"—projects that demonstrate innovation, resolve and quality problem-solving abilities.  

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +44

Spotlight: Walter Gropius

11:30 - 18 May, 2016
Spotlight: Walter Gropius, Bauhaus, 1925. Image © Thomas Lewandovski
Bauhaus, 1925. Image © Thomas Lewandovski

One of the most highly regarded architects of the 20th century, Walter Gropius (18 May 1883 – 5 July 1969) was one of the founding fathers of Modernism, and the founder of the Bauhaus, the German "School of Building" that embraced elements of art, architecture, graphic design, interior design, industrial design, and typography in its design, development and production.

April's Project of the Month: Colorado Outward Bound Micro Cabins

09:30 - 11 May, 2016
April's Project of the Month: Colorado Outward Bound Micro Cabins, © Jesse Kuroiwa
© Jesse Kuroiwa

The process of carrying out a project from start to finish includes many different variables, from determining the users' needs to figuring out how best to set up the work site. The latter are an important part of determining the project logistics as well as its design criteria. Colorado Outward Bound Micro Cabins emphasize this process, using a planning logic that takes into account the design of a minimally-sized living unit under extreme conditions as well as the execution of the assembly in a short time and in a place of difficult access.