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Zaha Hadid Architects' Antwerp Port House Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

09:15 - 23 September, 2016
Zaha Hadid Architects' Antwerp Port House Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Zaha Hadid Architects' new Port House in the Belgian city of Antwerp, which has been almost a decade in planning and construction, officially opens this week. A monumental new structure sits above a repurposed and renovated (formerly derelict) fire station, providing a new headquarters for Europe's second largest shipping port. Housing 500 staff, who will now be under the same roof for the first time, the building represents a sustainable and future-proof workplace for its employees. Photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has visited to capture his unique perspective on this new addition to the city's crane-covered skyline.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +42

Experience the "Brutal Faith" of Gottfried Böhm's Pilgrimage Church in Neviges

04:00 - 23 September, 2016
Experience the "Brutal Faith" of Gottfried Böhm's Pilgrimage Church in Neviges, Courtesy LOBBY Magazine. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Courtesy LOBBY Magazine. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

This exclusive photo essay by Laurian Ghinitoiu was originally commissioned for the fifth issue of LOBBY. Available later this month, the latest issue of the London-based magazine—published in cooperation with the Bartlett School of Architecture—examines the theme of Faith as "a fervent drive, a dangerous doctrine, a beautifully fragile yet enduring construct, an unapologetic excuse, a desperate call for attention and a timely consideration on architectural responsibility."

In 1986 the Pritzker Architecture Prize announced their first German laureate. In a speech at the ceremony in London’s Goldsmiths’ Hall, the Duke of Gloucester suggested that the prize “may not guarantee immorality,” inferring, perhaps, that not even the most prestigious award in architecture could compete with an œuvre so compact, focussed and enduring as that of Gottfried Böhm – a “son, grandson, husband, and father of architects.”

Courtesy LOBBY Magazine. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Courtesy LOBBY Magazine. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Courtesy LOBBY Magazine. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Courtesy LOBBY Magazine. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu +24

Johnston Marklee Named Artistic Directors of the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial

08:10 - 21 September, 2016
© Eric Staudenmaier Courtesy Chicago Architecture Biennial
© Eric Staudenmaier Courtesy Chicago Architecture Biennial

The Chicago Architecture Biennial (CAB) has announced that Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee, of the Los Angeles-based firm Johnston Marklee, have been named Artistic Directors for the 2017 event. Following a successful inaugural run in 2015, the second edition of the biennial will take place from September 16 - December 31, 2017.

Speaking exclusively to ArchDaily, Artistic Directors Sharon Johnston and Mark Lee said:

We are thrilled with the invitation to be the Artistic Directors for the second edition of the largest exhibition of contemporary architecture in North America. To have a global platform to address current ideas and showcase the talent in the field of architecture in a city with such an extraordinary architectural pedigree is a once in a lifetime opportunity.

Sauerbruch Hutton Invite Reflection On How We Perceive, Discuss, and Produce Architecture

04:00 - 20 September, 2016
Sauerbruch Hutton Invite Reflection On How We Perceive, Discuss, and Produce Architecture, Archive 2 / Sauerbruch Hutton. Image Courtesy of Lars Müller Publishers
Archive 2 / Sauerbruch Hutton. Image Courtesy of Lars Müller Publishers

Louisa Hutton and Matthias Sauerbruch, of Berlin-based practice Sauerbruch Hutton, have recently published Archive 2 – a second series of monographic volumes dedicated to the work of their practice between 2006 and 2015. In the nine years between two sets of books, the architects have observed that "the expansion of the digital realm has had a profound effect on the way we perceive, discuss and produce architecture." As such, and on the occasion of their second volume, they are inviting people to share their thoughts "on the convergence of architecture in concrete, pixel and print."

Chișinău Cast in Concrete: the Republic of Moldova's (Partially Abandoned) Soviet Legacy

04:00 - 16 September, 2016
Chișinău Cast in Concrete: the Republic of Moldova's (Partially Abandoned) Soviet Legacy, The Fashion Center (Centrul de Modă) by V. Zaharov, L. Gofman and G. Jinkin (1970s). Image © Roberto Conte
The Fashion Center (Centrul de Modă) by V. Zaharov, L. Gofman and G. Jinkin (1970s). Image © Roberto Conte

The Republic of Moldova, a landlocked country in the east of Europe bordered by Romania and Ukraine, declared independence from the USSR on the 27th August 1991 at the moment in which the Soviet Block was in the process of dissolution. As with many formerly Soviet cities, Chișinău—the capital of Moldova—continues to play host to a collection of built relics from this time. Roberto Conte, a Milan-based photographer, has captured a collection of the more magnificent abandoned architectural examples, along with those still in use, today.

The Fashion Center (Centrul de Modă) by V. Zaharov, L. Gofman and G. Jinkin (1970s). Image © Roberto Conte The "Romanita," or "Romashka," collective housing tower for small family units by Oleg Vronsky (1978-1986). Image © Roberto Conte Government parking (1978). Image © Roberto Conte The Cosmos Hotel by B. Banykin and Irina Kolbayeva (1983). Image © Roberto Conte +17

Atelier Bow-Wow, OMA, and Amale Andraos Live From the 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale

16:00 - 14 September, 2016
The After Belonging Agency: Carlos Minguez Carrasco, Ignacio Galán, Alejandra Navarrese Llopis, Lluís Alexandre Casanovas Blanco and Marina Otero Verzier. Image Courtesy of Oslo Architecture Triennale
The After Belonging Agency: Carlos Minguez Carrasco, Ignacio Galán, Alejandra Navarrese Llopis, Lluís Alexandre Casanovas Blanco and Marina Otero Verzier. Image Courtesy of Oslo Architecture Triennale

“Belonging,” the curatorial quintet of the 2016 Oslo Architecture Triennale, After Belonging, argue, “is no longer something bound to one’s own space of residence, or to the territory of a nation.” For this group of Spanish-born architects, academics and theorists—Lluís Alexandre Casanovas Blanco, Ignacio Galán, Carlos Minguez Carrasco, Alejandra Navarrese Llopis and Marina Otero Verzier—the very notion of our belongings and what it means to belong is becoming increasingly unstable.

After Belonging is the sixth incarnation of the Triennale and the first one in which a single curatorial thread has woven all of the festival’s activities together, including the international conference. The goal of the two primary exhibitions—On Residence and In Residence, including a series of Intervention Strategies—is to develop platforms with the aim of “rehearsing research strategies,” providing new ways for architects to engage with “contemporary changing realities."

Introducing Volume #49: Hello World!

04:30 - 13 September, 2016
Introducing Volume #49: Hello World!, © Volume
© Volume

Machines have long been integral to architectural discourse. Vitruvius concluded his ten books with a meditation on war machines, and Le Corbusier published on his industrial muses just over 100 years ago. Yet something is different today. We have always learned from machines—our societies are fundamentally shaped by their processes—but now, machines learn. We live in paradoxical times. Machinic processes, computational algorithms and artificial intelligence have never been so proximate, direct, and intimate to daily life, yet we are many steps removed from their practical operations.

This issue of Volume, the third in our Learning series, seeks to take one small step in the direction towards understanding the contemporary relevance of machines for architecture, and one giant leap for mankind. Volume #49: Hello World! also includes In Loving Support, a 32-page insert produced with Het Nieuwe Instituut on living and working with algorithms.

These Are the Best-Designed, Most Useful Architecture Firm Websites

07:00 - 12 September, 2016
These Are the Best-Designed, Most Useful Architecture Firm Websites

Our editors look at hundreds of websites per week. What do they admire and appreciate the most? Organization and simplicity. Sites that are not only clean, but fast. We actively search for projects to include on our platform, so it’s crucial that when we visit a website we not only know where to look, but how to access information. Filters and facets are our best friends. Typological differentiation is important, but perhaps not as important as distinguishing between built and un-built projects (“Is that a render?” is a question that comes up at least once a day).

Call for Entries: RIBA Design Competition - 'The Wall'

11:10 - 8 September, 2016
Call for Entries: RIBA Design Competition - 'The Wall', via RIBA Competitions
via RIBA Competitions

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is pleased to announce the launch of an international open design competition for ‘The Wall’ - a structure made of a million bricks to represent answered prayer. The competition is being managed on behalf of the charity Network, The Evangelical Council for the Manchester Area Trust.

Is the New iPhone 7 The Best Cell Phone for Architects?

15:32 - 7 September, 2016
Is the New iPhone 7 The Best Cell Phone for Architects?, via Apple Special Event Streaming. September 7, 2016.
via Apple Special Event Streaming. September 7, 2016.

The iPhone 7 is here. Announced at Apple’s September Launch event today, the new device and its sibling, the iPhone 7 plus, have arrived after months of rumors, leaks and anticipation. The phones are loaded with a bevy of new components, including a new pressure-sensitive home button and bluetooth headphones, marking another step in the journey toward our wireless future.

Of course, in spite of the hype that the new iPhone will inevitably get—as it always does—it’s not the only smartphone on the market. Many will point to the fact that its expected RAM capabilities (2GB for the iPhone 7 and 3GB for the 7 Plus) still lag behind some competitors (for comparison the Samsung Galaxy S7 has 3GB and the S7 Edge 4GB), while the upgraded 32GB storage and newly-found water-resistance are no more than catching up with Apple’s competition. Nonetheless, Apple’s iPhone 7 also features a number of features that could make it a phone perfectly suited to architects. Read on to find out exactly why.

"Circus, Circus" Brings Architectural Interventions to the Bauhaus Dessau

16:00 - 5 September, 2016
"Circus, Circus" Brings Architectural Interventions to the Bauhaus Dessau, Bauhaus Festival 2016. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Bauhaus Festival 2016. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

This past weekend, the Bauhaus in Dessau was animated by the Bauhaus Festival. Titled “Circus, Circus – from Black to White,” the event was intended to present all the fun of the fair with a monochrome twist--in opposition to the wild colors usually associated with circuses--and in the words of the Bauhaus was a “kinetic explorations of bodies, objects, media, space and sound.” The event was also an opportunity to tap into the legacy of Bauhaus legend László Moholy-Nagy, whose experiments in film and media blend well with the performative nature of the circus. The event featured a number of performances by artists, while “Cybernetic Circus” by Anhalt University of Applied Sciences and the Initiative Neuer Zirkus turned the grounds of the Bauhaus into an “architectural landscape” of performance modules inspired by Maholy-Nagy. Also featured were installations by students at Burg Giebichenstein University of Art and Design Halle titled “Neo Luna Park.” Photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu traveled to the event to capture the festivities, showing their interaction with Walter Gropius’ famous building.

Bauhaus Festival 2016. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Bauhaus Festival 2016. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Bauhaus Festival 2016. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu Bauhaus Festival 2016. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu +36

The Best Student Design-Build Projects Worldwide 2016

09:30 - 5 September, 2016

Last year, we asked the graduating students among the ArchDaily community to show us the design-build projects which they may have completed as part of their studies. The response we received was astonishing, and we were so impressed with the results that we simply had to do it again this year. So, two months ago we once again teamed up with ArchDaily Brasil and all four ArchDaily en Español sites to put out another call for submissions, and once again the response was overwhelming. Across over 100 submissions, the quality of the projects we received was so high that this year's results are bigger and better, containing 36 projects from 20 different countries. So, read on for the best student-built work from around the world in 2016.

Project O (Hongkong Baptist University). Image Courtesy of Frank Chan Tesis Uno en Uno. Image Courtesy of Stefania Torchio, Santiago Iribarne Wynne Universidade Federal de Goiás - UFG. Image Courtesy of Luccas Chaves DIA 3D Jewelry Pavilion (Dessau International Architecture Graduate School). Image © Pavel Babienko +182

Call for Submissions: Sketch Your Desk/Workspace

07:00 - 5 September, 2016
Call for Submissions: Sketch Your Desk/Workspace, ArchDaily's Newsroom. Image © Leandro Fuenzalida
ArchDaily's Newsroom. Image © Leandro Fuenzalida

A few years ago we asked our readers to submit photos of their offices so that we could celebrate the many different environments in which architecture is created. Now we're asking you to not only show us where you work but also how you work. We want to see your immaculately curated desks and your overflowing studio cubicles—but more importantly, we want to see those sketching skills! 

Spotlight: Kenzō Tange

08:00 - 4 September, 2016
Spotlight: Kenzō Tange, St. Mary Cathedral. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/9160678@N06/1351951533'>Flickr user scarletgreen</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
St. Mary Cathedral. Image © Flickr user scarletgreen licensed under CC BY 2.0

As one of the eldest in a long line of architects that have made Japan one of the most revered countries in architecture, Pritzker-Prize Winning architect Kenzō Tange (4 September 1913 - 22 March 2005) helped define Japan’s post-WWII emergence into Modernism. Though he was trained as an architect, Tange was equally as influential as an urban planner giving him significant influence in Japan and around the world at both large and small scales.

The Stories Behind 17 Skyscrapers & High-Rise Buildings That Changed Architecture

11:00 - 3 September, 2016

The skyscraper: representative of spatial economy and a symbol of power. This building typology has a storied, turbulent and even contested past. Here, we bring you a selection some of the skyscrapers and high-rise buildings featured in our AD Classics section. 

Video: Zaha Hadid Discusses the Influence of Kazimir Malevich on her Work

16:00 - 1 September, 2016

This video, presented by the BBC, takes a look at the work of Zaha Hadid as inspired by her favorite artist: the Russian Suprematist painter Kazimir Malevich. Featuring interviews with the dame herself, the narrative looks all the way back to Hadid’s origins, including her time at the Architectural Association School in London. It was there that she designed “Malevich’s Tektonik,” a hotel along the Thames River based upon the works of Malevich. Hadid believed that this work radically drove the architectural outlook she would employ for the remainder of her career:

“I was very fascinated by abstraction and how it really could lead to abstracting plans, moving away from certain dogmas about what architecture is. That project really liberated me, freed me from all these rules.”

Check out the video, currently on display as part of the Zaha Hadid retrospective at the Venice Biennale, for more on how Hadid drew inspiration from the Russian artist.

At 2016 Biennale Half-Point, We Celebrate Architects: "Spiral Travelers That Imagine Our Universe"

01:00 - 30 August, 2016

92 days into the 2016 Venice Biennale we have reached its exact midpoint, and the ArchDaily team, together with photographer Jesús Granada, bring you a video compilation from the opening days. With this video we want to thank the architects and talented teams that worked to produce invaluable exhibitions that were a joy to photograph and document. They showed patience, availability and attention to detail that made our job much easier. We also extend our thanks to architects in general—"viajeros en espiral que imaginan el universo" (spiral travelers that imagine our universe)—who inspire the work of all of us ArchDaily. 

OPA Envisions a Transcendental Cliffside Chapel with Lux Aeterna

16:00 - 26 August, 2016
OPA Envisions a Transcendental Cliffside Chapel with Lux Aeterna, Courtesy of OPA Open Platform for Architecture
Courtesy of OPA Open Platform for Architecture

Open Platform for Architecture (OPA) has released designs for the latest in their series of cliffside buildings: Lux Aeterna / Holy Cross Chapel. Similar to their previous project, Casa Brutale, the chapel employs a style referred to by OPA as “Transcendental Brutalism,” and has been embedded into the side of a cliff. The front profile of the building takes the shape of a cross, to be a seen as a spiritual beacon as it is approached from the water.

Courtesy of OPA Open Platform for Architecture Courtesy of OPA Open Platform for Architecture Courtesy of OPA Open Platform for Architecture Courtesy of OPA Open Platform for Architecture +30