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Cobogo: The Latest Architecture and News

How to Use Hollow Elements in Home Architecture

Visual permeability, ventilation and a strong identity appeal, the hollow elements have increasingly found their place in contemporary architecture. Whether in large buildings or small residences, they appear in different shapes, materials and compositions, helping to determine the degree of interaction between interior and exterior space. This artifice in a residential construction is an important tool to ensure privacy and intimacy, without losing the possibility of connections to the outside and natural ventilation.

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Clay or Concrete, Solid or Hollow: Different Types of Bricks and Their Uses

The term brick is often used as a synonym for common clay solid blocks, but there's more to it. Bricks are perhaps the most elementary of building materials and can be used to design modular, optimized, and most importantly, versatile buildings. This article explores the most popular types of bricks according to their use in construction.

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Cobogós and Tiles: Designer Affectively Maps the Architecture of Olinda, Brazil

In the Historic Center of Olinda, a Brazilian municipality in the state of Pernambuco, architecture borrows shapes and colors from nature; cobogós perforations on the balconies look like round leaves and fruits, while the railings spiral with a hint of twisted flowers. The colors of the earth and sky also reappear in the floors, backyards, kitchens, and rooms of colonial houses, coating them in shades of brown and blue.

Torto House / Taguá Arquitetura

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  • Architects: Taguá Arquitetura
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  2852 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2018
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Alumi, Ceramic Portinari, Guerdau, Roca, Samsung, +3

Cobogós: A Brief History and Its Uses

© Nelson Kon
© Nelson Kon

In the tropics, the sunlight falls generously. The leaked elements draw the shadow on floors and walls, an effect that transforms the entire environment for those who see it from the outside and inside. With the changing seasons and throughout the course of the day, natural light comes in different ways as it adds new components to architecture. In the course of the night, the artificial light passes through the small openings from the inside to the outside, making a sort of urban lamp that interacts with the shadows of its users and furniture. 

In addition to its function, the cobogó brings a certain poetic feel to any architectural project. Here, we have highlighted this Brazilian creation, to briefly shed light on its history and to present a selection of projects that adopt this element. 

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