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Artificial Lighting: The Latest Architecture and News

Artificial Lighting in Interior Design

Natural or artificial, lighting is one of the most important elements in architecture, directly affecting our perception of spaces. It is capable of defining volumes, enhancing colors, textures, and therefore, contributing to the overall relationship between dimension, proportion, and contrasts. One of the many challenges of architecture is to shape spaces based on light and shade, and sometimes natural light is not enough, requiring additional light sources to be installed and controlled.

 Loft Solar / Talita Nogueira Arquitetura. Image © Eduardo MacariosFast Shop Lifestyle Ibirapuera Store / Kengo Kuma & Associates. Image © Nelson KonClínica MJanson Ortodontia / Caracho Arquitetos. Image © Daniel SantoDengo Chocolates Concept Store / Matheus Farah + Manoel Maia Arquitetura. Image © Fran Parente+ 26

Beyond Artificial Lighting: Museums Exploring the Benefits of Daylight

Lighting design for exhibition spaces in museums can be quite challenging because light must simultaneously enhance the space, preserve the integrity of the artworks and highlight them in a way that ensures the best conditions for the visitor's enjoyment.

In addition to having the highest CRI (Color Rendering Index), daylight contributes to a feeling of comfort and well-being in the built environment. In exhibition spaces, natural lighting is important to accurately reveal the colors of the objects on display, which is very significant for works of art and provides more visual comfort for visitors to clearly perceive the exhibits.

Museo Jumex / David Chipperfield Architects. Image: © Simon MengesCantonal Museum of Fine Arts / BAROZZI VEIGA. Image: © Simon MengesYingliang Stone Natural History Museum / Atelier Alter Architects. Courtesy of Atelier Alter ArchitectsFine Arts Museum of Asturias / Francisco Mangado. Image: © Pedro Pegenaute+ 13

Cleaning Spaces With Light: Ultraviolet Radiation To Kill Viruses and Bacteria

In dystopian films, it is a common trope to depict the sky as filled with a thick fog, blocking the sun's rays and bringing a dark atmosphere to the scenes. Whether in Blade Runner or in a Black Mirror episode, the lack of sun commonly represents a future we would rather not live in. The sun provides heat to planet Earth and is a great source of light energy, essential for the survival of many living creatures. We can generate electricity from the sun and still use only a fraction of the energy it provides. Sunlight also regulates our circadian cycle, which affects our mood. But recent forest fires and industrial pollution in some large cities have already made the dystopian blockage of sun a relatively common phenomenon, depriving hours of sunshine from many inhabitants. Concurrently, with the COVID-19 pandemic, we are living a plot that few science fiction writers could have predicted, and new technologies and solutions have emerged to try to contain the spread of this invisible enemy. Can the sun, or specifically ultraviolet radiation, kill viruses and bacteria? Could it kill the coronavirus?

How Artificial Lighting can Improve (or Worsen) Architecture

Of the varying aspects of architectural and interior design, lighting is one element that can visually enhance or destroy a space. This influence stems from the wide range of artificial lighting designed for the most widely differing tasks, environments, and purposes, including internal and even external spaces such as facades and landscape projects. Think of two environments with the same dimensions and layout. Suppose that in the first, only one point of light was applied - a general, unspecified point of light in this case - while in the second a light project was performed considering the use of space and valuing certain aspects of the architectural design. Undoubtedly, the second option is a more pleasant space. In the same way, poor lighting design can ruin an environment. But how is it possible to achieve these different results?

In a previous article, we already showed how to calculate the correct light intensity required for each environment. Here, we compile a list of some of the key types of lighting systems.