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Thomas Jantscher

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Socio Educational Workshops / FWG ARCHITECTS SARL

© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Delphine Burtin© Thomas Jantscher+ 33

OSB Panels in Interiors: From a Humble Material to a Design Feature

From its outer skin to its structural framing system, a building is made out of many layers. Just like a human body, many of those layers – which tend to be the most crucial, functional components – remain unseen by the public, covered with aesthetic features. Among all the hidden elements, all buildings include sheathing, the outer casing that construction crews place to serve several key purposes: protect the floor, walls, roofs and ceilings, fortify the structure against internal and external forces, and cover the entire framework, giving the building a solid shape.

Wood is the most common material for sheathing, with Oriented strand board (OSB) panels usually being the top choice. Why? Made by compressing and gluing cross-oriented strands of wood together with heat-cured adhesives, OSB boards are lightweight, flexible, strong, versatile and fully recyclable. They also stand out by resisting deflection, warping and distortion, apart from offering some thermal and acoustic insulation. However, besides their good performance and mechanical properties, OSB is especially known for being cheaper than other alternatives, drastically saving both costs and time. In fact, this structural panel can be $3 to $5 less expensive than plywood, which explains why it is often considered its low-cost substitute.

Pré-Bois Building / BDA&E

© Thomas Jantscher© Jendly Vincent© Jendly Vincent© Jendly Vincent+ 28

School in Saint-Maurice / Graeme Mann & Patricia Capua Mann

© Thomas Jantscher© Yves André© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher+ 28

Bornet House / Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

© Kristyna Strejcovska© Kristyna Strejcovska© Kristyna Strejcovska© Kristyna Strejcovska+ 40

Copper Projects: Architecture’s Original Bling

© Adam Mørk
© Adam Mørk

© Thomas Ott© David Foessel© Joan Bracco & Cécile Septet© Adam Mørk+ 18

Since its discovery in 8700 B.C., copper has been one of the most used metals in the history of humankind. It has a variety of uses from coins and weapons to statues and even architecture. One of its first architectural uses was in Ancient Egypt for the massive doors of the temple to Amen-Re at Karnak in 300 B.C.

The versatility of the material continues in architecture to this day, allowing for a variety of unique designs and uses. The innovative, efficient, and lightweight material is versatile in its use, ranging from facades to roofs, interior applications, and high tech solutions. Sustainable in its natural form, the material is 100% recycled. As the state of architecture becomes more focused on sustainability, copper becomes the ideal material for the buildings of today.

Below, we’ve selected 7 projects that use architecture's original bling.

17 Unconventional Stair Railings To Inspire Your Next Project

Cortesía de Olgooco Mohammad Hassan Ettefagh© Tomas Balej© Fran Parente© Christian Richters+ 18

Guardrails and handrails are two elements that are often confused. While the first is used to close a space and prevent a person from falling, the second is a support bar for balance. Normally standard solutions are used for both elements, but with an attractive design, they can become standout details in a project.

For inspiration on materials, structures, and details of guardrails and handrails, here are 17 notable examples.

Muller Villa / Andrea Pelati Architecte

© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher+ 14

Cortaillod, Switzerland

10 Wonderful Winter Cabins: The Best Photos of the Week

© Thomas JantscherCortesía de VIPP© Getaway© Pasi Aalto+ 11

December 21 saw the winter solstice in the northern hemisphere. The season is an excellent time to take architectural photographs in a unique and different landscape, with a blanket of snow providing a reminder of the delights of nature. Here, we present a selection of 10 cabins captured in winter by prominent photographers such as Tim Bies, Fernando Alda and Pasi Aalto.

Multifunctional Building and Infrastructure / bunq architectes

© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher+ 13

  • Architects: bunq architectes
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  2250
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2012

Reynard/Rossi-Udry House / Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher+ 20

Barn Conversion / Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

© Thomas Jantscher
© Thomas Jantscher

© Thomas Jantscher           © Thomas Jantscher           © Thomas Jantscher           © Thomas Jantscher           + 19

Loterie Suisse Romande / CCHE

© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher+ 9

  • Architects: CCHE
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  11200
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2015
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  2tec2, Interface, Knoll

Villas Jonc / Christian von Düring

© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher+ 25

Grand-Saconnex, Switzerland
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  1720
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2009
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Duravit, Forster, Forster Custom Kitchen, Thermocellite
  • Professionals : ATBA SA, EDMS

Petit Mont-Riond / CCHE

© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher+ 12

  • Architects: CCHE
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  11000
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2015
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Fahrni Fassadensysteme, Constantin Martial & Cie, Réalidée SA
  • Professionals : ZARIC

Centre Sportif GEMS World Academy / CCHE

© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher+ 11

  • Architects: CCHE
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  3690
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2015
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Morand, NEOMAT, Rothlisberger

Pre/Post-School / Savioz Fabrizzi Architectes

© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher© Thomas Jantscher+ 17

Vétroz, Switzerland