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Peter Cook

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The Fratry Building Renovation at Carlisle Cathedral / Feilden Fowles

© Peter Cook© Peter Cook© Peter Cook© Peter Cook+ 13

  • Architects: Feilden Fowles
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  835
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Cumbrian stone, Hempstock, Martec Engineering, Premier Lifts, Set in Stone Flooring, +1

Jackson Hole House / McLean Quinlan

© David Agnello© Peter Cook© David Agnello© David Agnello+ 15

Archigram and the Dystopia of Small-Scale Living Spaces

"High Density". Image © Jorge TaboadaUn Cuarto Más / ANTNA. Image © Jaime NavarroUna pequeña casa australiana / CABN. Image Cortesía de CABN© Deutsches Architekturmuseum+ 8

Until recently, the origins of the tiny-house movement were of little interest to the scientific community; however, if we take a look at the history of architecture and its connection to the evolution of human lifestyles, we can detect pieces and patterns that paint a clearer picture of the foundations of this movement that has exploded in the last decade as people leave behind the excesses of old and opt for a much more minimalist and flexible way of life.  

The Evolution of Visual Representation in Architecture (and How It Will Continue to Change)

According to Howard Gardner, human intelligence can be classified into 8 different categories. One of these is spatial intelligence, which describes the ability to mentally create and imagine three-dimensional spaces. Architecture is one of many disciplines that benefits from this ability and in this article we will explore just how visual representation in architecture has evolved throughout history--from displaying the most brilliant of ideas to capturing the wildest of dreams.

Spotlight: Peter Cook

As one of the founding members of Archigram, the avant-garde neo-futurist architecture group of the 1960s, the British architect, professor, and writer Sir Peter Cook (born 22 October 1936) has been a pivotal figure within the global architectural world for over half a century; one of his most significant works from his time with Archigram, The Plug-In City, still invokes debates on technology and society, challenging standards of architectural discourse today.

Plug-In City. Image © Peter Cook via the <a href='http://archigram.westminster.ac.uk/'>Archigram Archival Project</a>Abedian School of Architecture / CRAB Studio. Image © Peter BennettsDepartments Of Law And Central Administration / CRAB Studio. Image © Ronald KreimelCLT Innovation Center for the Arts University Bournemouth / CRAB Studio. Image Courtesy of CRAB Studio+ 25

Bracken House Office Building / John Robertson Architects

© Peter Cook© Peter Cook© Peter Cook© Peter Cook+ 36

The Weston Visitor Centre and Gallery / Feilden Fowles

© Peter Cook© Peter Cook© Peter Cook© Peter Cook+ 19

The Royal College of Pathologists / Bennetts Associates

© Peter Cook© Peter Cook© Peter Cook© Peter Cook+ 24

Archigram's Entire Archive Purchased by M+ Museum in Hong Kong

The M+ Museum in Hong Kong, designed by Herzog & de Meuron, has purchased the entire archive of the prominent Archigram group. As reported by the Architect’s Journal, the collection was sold for £1.8 million, having been given the go-ahead by the UK’s Culture Secretary Jeremy Wright.

The sale has not been without controversy, with opposition from the Arts Council’s reviewing committee on the export of works of art and objects of cultural interest. The committee had sought a delay in the sale until a buyer was found who would keep the collection in the UK.

© Peter Cook© Deutsches Architekturmuseum© Archigram Archives© Archigram Archives+ 7

Zinc-Coated Buildings: 20 Recyclable and Durable Facades

Zinc is a natural element extracted from ores. Its symbol, which appears in the dreaded Periodic Table, is Zn. Through a metallurgical process of burning its impurities (reducing zinc oxide and refining), it assumes a much more friendly appearance, and later becomes the sheets, coils, and rollers used in construction. The main characteristic of this material is its malleability, which allows it to be worked easily, allowing to cover complex forms in facades and roofs of buildings.

"We Dream of Instant Cities that Could Sprout like Spring Flowers": The Radical Architecture Collectives of the 60s and 70s

The first moon landing, widespread anti-war protests, Woodstock and the hippies, rural communes and environmentalism, the Berlin Wall, the women’s liberation movement and so much more—the tumultuous decades of the Sixties and Seventies occupy an unforgettable place in history. With injustices openly questioned and radical ideas that set out to unseat existing conventions and practices in various spheres of life, things weren’t any different in the architectural world. 

The grand visions dreamt up by the modernists were soon challenged by utopian experiments from the “anti-architecture” or “radical design” groups of the 1960–70s. Reestablishing architecture as an instrument of political, social, and cultural critique, they drafted bold manifestoes and designs, experimented with collage, music, performance art, furniture, graphic design, zines, installations, events, and exhibitions. While certain individuals from this era like Cedric Price, Hans Hollein, and Yona Friedman remain important to the realm of the radical and the unbuilt, the revolutionary spirit of these decades also saw the birth of various young collectives. For eccentricity at its very best, read on for a (by no means exhaustive) list of some groups who dared to question, poke, expand, rebel against, disrupt and redefine architecture in the 60s and 70s.

Heckfield Place / Spratley & Partners

© Peter Cook
© Peter Cook

Courtesy of Spratley & Partners© Peter Cook© Peter Cook© Peter Cook+ 19

RIBA Announces 2018 National Award Winners

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced the 49 winners of the 2018 RIBA National Awards. From skyline-altering buildings to sensitive small-scale sculptures, this year’s top projects showcase a wide-ranging selection of scales, featuring designs from Foster + Partners, Hawkins\Brown, Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, and Niall McLaughlin Architects.

© Sarah Blee© Peter Landers© Jack Hobhouse© Keith Barnes+ 76

Lombard Wharf / Patel Taylor

© Peter Cook© Barratt London© Peter Cook© Barratt London+ 30

Westkaai Towers 5 & 6 / Tony Fretton Architects

Courtesy of Filip Dujardin© Peter CookCourtesy of Filip Dujardin© Peter Cook+ 26

Antwerpen, Belgium
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  16500
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2016
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Anodised, Desta

Storyhouse / Bennetts Associates

© Peter Cook© Peter Cook© Peter Cook© Peter Cook+ 31

Cheshire West and Chester, United Kingdom

80 at 80 Exhibition to Celebrate the Architectural Career of Sir Peter Cook

Courtesy of Bartlett School of Architecture
Courtesy of Bartlett School of Architecture

The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, is celebrating the opening of its new building at 22 Gordon Street with an exhibition of work by visionary architect Sir Peter Cook. Running from 23 February to 10 March 2017, the exhibition marks Sir Peter’s 80th year with a celebration of 80 of his inspired and pioneering projects.