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Leonid Furmansky

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Temporary Tiger - Covid Classroom / Murray Legge Architecture

© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky+ 16

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  500 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: GRAPHISOFT, Tang Sunshades
  • Professionals: Fort Structures

Manifold House / Matt Fajkus Architecture

© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky+ 33

Hunt Studio / Hunt Architecture

© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky+ 19

Textured Fiber Cement: A More Sensory Architectural Experience

 | Sponsored Content

Claude Monet and Vincent van Gogh used the impasto technique extensively in their paintings. Both applied thick layers of oil paint over the canvas, usually one shade at a time, and it was up to the viewer's brain to mix the colors and create the desired effects. When dry, the paint forms reliefs and textures on the canvas, evoking a sense of movement. Even without being able to touch the screen, the texture of the brushstrokes gives a three-dimensionality to the painting, something that can only be fully observed by seeing the artwork live, looking at it from more than one angle and actually experiencing it.

In his famous book “The Eyes of the Skin: Architecture and the Senses,” Juhani Pallasmaa points to "a predilection in favor of vision and in detriment of the other senses in the way architecture was conceived, taught and criticized, as well as the consequent disappearance of sensory and sensual characteristics in arts and architecture." According to the author, "an architectural work is not experienced as a series of isolated retinal images, but in its fully integrated material, corporeal, and spiritual essence."

Canterbury House / Murray Legge Architecture

© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky+ 30

Watkins Insurance Building / Wang Architects

© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky+ 30

Little Tiger Chinese Immersion School / Murray Legge Architecture

© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky+ 18

Guadalupe River House / Low Design Office

© Leonid Furmansky© Casey Dunn© Casey Dunn© Leonid Furmansky+ 26

New Braunfels, United States
  • Architects: Low Design Office
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  2884 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Metalcraft, Don Young Company, Factory Building Store, Jimmy's Cypress, New Braunfel's Glass, +1
  • Professionals: JM Structural Engineering

Color Trail Pavilion / Faye + Walker

© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky+ 14

  • Architects: Faye + Walker
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  253 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Strap Works

Moody Pavilions / Trahan Architects

© Leonid Furmansky© Alexa Johnson© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky+ 12

How to Choose Light Bulbs for an Architectural Project

Walking into an electrical store can be intimidating. At first glance all the lights are on, and the thousands of chandeliers and lamps are blinding. When you walk toward the lamps, you see shelves with dozens of options, shapes, colors, prices, and uses. In each package, informational tables with numbers that seem to make no sense at all. Lumens, color temperature, wattage. There are so many confusing terms. But before you give up on everything and rush back with the cheapest option, turning the lamp on only for it to make your house or the house you designed feel like a sinister back-country funeral home, some basic information can help you a lot. We know that good lighting design can greatly improve a building or even its occupant's productivity. And poorly designed lighting can ruin it or negatively affect its occupants. To help out, we've gathered some information that can help you the next time a light bulb burns out in your home.

The Commune Collaborative Workspace / Hunt Architecture

© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky+ 41

David Street House / Murray Legge Architecture

© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky© Leonid Furmansky+ 45