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 Jeroen Musch

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First Look into Expo 2020 Dubai: 6 Must See National Pavilions

After a year delay due to the worldwide pandemic, October 1st saw the inauguration of one of the most anticipated events of the year; the Expo 2020 in Dubai. The event, which is being held for the first time in the Middle East, focuses on architecture, culture, and innovation, with over 191 national participants. The pavilions on display are divided into three districts: Mobility, Sustainability, and Opportunity, each showcasing how their country has contributed and will contribute to its respective theme. In addition to the national pavilions, each district has its own thematic pavilion: the Sustainability Pavilion “Terra” by Grimshaw, the Mobility Pavilion “Alif” by Foster + Partners, and the Opportunity Pavilion “Mission Possible” by AGi Architects.

Read on to discover 6 must-see national pavilions of each district that explored their designated theme in a unique and captivating way. 

Korean Pavilion. Image Courtesy of Expo 2020 DubaiBahrain Pavilion. Image © Dima StouhiNetherlands Pavilion. Image © Jeroen MuschBrazilian Pavilion . Image © Dima Stouhi+ 7

The Netherlands Pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai Creates a New Temporary Biotope in the Desert

The Netherlands Pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai proposes a circular climate system that harvests water, energy, manufactures rain and produces food, creating a temporary biotope that embodies the fusion between art, architecture and technology. Designed by V8 Architects, with a visitor experience curated by Kossmanndejong, the pavilion creates a multi-sensory narrative around natural phenomena. Industrial materials like metal sheets, steel tubes, ducts and pipes blend unexpectedly with vegetation and textile fabrics to create a spatial journey culminating in a centrepiece that provides a tranquil stop amidst the bustle of the Expo.

© Jeroen MuschCourtesy of Netherlands Pavilion and Kossmanndejong© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch+ 23

Pontsteiger Residential Building / Arons en Gelauff architecten

© Jeroen MuschCourtesy of Ossip van Duivenbode© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch+ 40

Hammerbakken House / SpaceGroup

© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch+ 17

Oslo, Norway
  • Architects: SpaceGroup
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  350
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2017

Applied, Flush and Reveal: What Are the Types of Baseboards?

Architects are known for returning from travel with more photos of buildings than people and for having an esoteric vocabulary of their own. Of course, these are clichés that are not always true. But something that unites most designers is the tendency to pay attention to each detail that makes up a project, be it the material that covers the facade, the junction between different floors, how the doors open, the type of window frame, how the forms were put together for concreting, and more. But a detail that often goes unnoticed – and that makes a huge difference in interior design – is baseboards.

ZigZag House / Jasper Smits Architecture

© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch+ 26

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  236
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Ruukki, Nemetschek, Xinnix, Fabiton, Iboma, +3

Mirrors in Architecture: Possibilities of Reflected Space

Mirror Garden / ARCHSTUDIO. Image © Ning Wang
Mirror Garden / ARCHSTUDIO. Image © Ning Wang

KAP-House / ONG&ONG Pte Ltd. Image © Derek SwalwellSi estas paredes hablasen / Serrano + Baquero Arquitectos. Image © Fernando AldaPH José Mármol / Estudio Yama. Image © Javier Agustin RojasThe Mirror Window / Kosaku Matsumoto. Image © Nobutada Omote+ 39

Humans have used mirrors since as early as 600 BCE, employing highly polished obsidian as a basic reflective surface. Over time, people began to use small pieces of gold, silver, and aluminum in a similar manner, both for their reflective properties and for decoration. By the 1st century CE, people had started using glass to make mirrors, but it was only during the European Renaissance that Venetian manufacturers began making mirrors by applying metallic backings to glass sheets, remaining the most common general method of mirror manufacturing today. Since then, mirrors have continued to play both a decorative and functional role in architecture, serving a clean, modern aesthetic despite its ancient origins. Below, we investigate how mirrors are made, provide a brief history of mirrors in architecture, and offer several tips for architects looking to use mirrors in their designs.

Dafne Schippersburg Bridge / NEXT architects and rudy uytenhaak + partners architecten

© Marcel IJzerman© Marcel IJzerman© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch+ 27

Amstel Tower / Powerhouse Company

© Ossip van Duivenbode© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch© Egbert de Boer+ 14

Fast Food Slowed Down: What's Behind the All the Redesigns - and Is It Enough?

Some restaurants don’t need a review to get attention. You might know them for their longevity, their presence, or even just their advertisements. But most importantly, whether it’s their grand luminous logo, or the building’s prominent architecture and color palette, these franchises are more or less the same (the menu, the music, the interior design…), wherever you are, be it London, Lima, or Lahore.

Recently, however, a few of these places have begun to shift away from the “architectural stamp” that they use in all their branches, hiring design firms to rebrand their restaurants - and by extension, their image. This bespoke approach can result in outposts that are atypically site-specific, understated, and individual. For users, it may be a point of curiosity; a reason to revisit what you think you already know. For the brand, it's an attempt to cater to evolving tastes (culinary and otherwise) without having to alter the core product.

McDonald's Rotterdam. Image © Jeroen MuschFuel Station + McDonald's, Georgia. Image Courtesy of Giorgi KhmaladzeStarbucks Chelsea, NYC. Image Courtesy of StarbucksBurger King Garden Grill . Image Courtesy of Outofstock+ 20

De Verkenner Tower / Mei architects and planners

© Ossip van Duivenbode© Ossip van DuivenbodeCourtesy of Mei architects and planners© Ossip van Duivenbode+ 39

Tiny Office Pavilion Vught / studio PROTOTYPE

© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch+ 12

Gouda Cheese Warehouse Loft Apartments / Mei architects and planners

© Ossip van Duivenbode© Ossip van Duivenbode© Ossip van Duivenbode© Ossip van Duivenbode+ 37

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  5000
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2017
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Foreco, Braat, Orona Pecres, Van den Oudenrijn timmerfabriek, Vebo, +1
  • Professionals : Vergeer Bouw

Ortho Wijchen / studio PROTOTYPE

© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch+ 16

Villa Schoorl / Studio Prototype

©  Jeroen Musch©  Jeroen Musch©  Jeroen Musch©  Jeroen Musch+ 19

  • Architects: Studio Prototype
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2016
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Alumet, Elshof

Erasmus University Rotterdam / Paul de Ruiter Architects

© Sebastian van Damme ©  Jeroen Musch© Tim Van de Velde©  Jeroen Musch+ 33

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  8400
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2015
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Boomkwekerij Ebben

Transformation Forest House / Bloot Architecture

© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch© Jeroen Musch+ 14