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Jasper Sanidad

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Indoor Bleachers: From Offices to Homes

Sede da Unicred / Arquitetura Nacional. Image © Cristiano Bauce
Sede da Unicred / Arquitetura Nacional. Image © Cristiano Bauce

Circulation spaces are often challenging for designers as they are intended—as the name implies—for moving from one room to another. While many take advantage of these areas by using them as storage spaces, Mies van der Rohe at the Farnsworth house reduced circulation to a minimum, creating an open floor plan completely free of hallways. When faced with vertical circulation, the issue is similar. Stairs fulfill the purpose of overcoming the height between one floor and another, but rarely constitute indoor living spaces. Bleachers, in turn, play this role in several projects. Until recently, they were only found in sports spaces or amphitheaters; now the use of bleachers has become widespread and is seen in office spaces, public buildings, schools and even homes.

Sonoma Retreat / Studio Sarah Willmer

Sonoma Retreat / Studio Sarah WillmerSonoma Retreat / Studio Sarah WillmerSonoma Retreat / Studio Sarah WillmerSonoma Retreat / Studio Sarah Willmer+ 17

Healdsburg, United States

Berkeley Way Academic Office Building / WRNS Studio

Two-Way House / Studio Sarah Willmer

Two-Way House / Studio Sarah WillmerTwo-Way House / Studio Sarah WillmerTwo-Way House / Studio Sarah WillmerTwo-Way House / Studio Sarah Willmer+ 23

San Francisco, United States

Offices and Workplaces: Examples in Plan

The functional distribution plays a fundamental role in the contemporary design of offices and places for work. The study of the architecture plan shows an interesting form of approach; not only allows for proper logistics and circulation but find efficient variations and innovations that will enable better workspaces that adapt to the current needs.

We have selected more than 50 plans of projects that will inspire you, recognizing the different ways in which architects have faced the challenge to design offices, in all different scale ranges.

Adobe Town Hall / Valerio Dewalt Train Associates

Adobe Town Hall / Valerio Dewalt Train AssociatesAdobe Town Hall / Valerio Dewalt Train AssociatesAdobe Town Hall / Valerio Dewalt Train AssociatesAdobe Town Hall / Valerio Dewalt Train Associates+ 26

Uber EMEA Headquarters / Assembly Design Studio + Cannon Design

Uber EMEA Headquarters / Assembly Design Studio + Cannon DesignUber EMEA Headquarters / Assembly Design Studio + Cannon DesignUber EMEA Headquarters / Assembly Design Studio + Cannon DesignUber EMEA Headquarters / Assembly Design Studio + Cannon Design+ 17

Uber Advanced Technologies Group Center / Assembly Design Studio

© Jasper Sanidad
© Jasper Sanidad

Uber Advanced Technologies Group Center / Assembly Design StudioUber Advanced Technologies Group Center / Assembly Design StudioUber Advanced Technologies Group Center / Assembly Design StudioUber Advanced Technologies Group Center / Assembly Design Studio+ 14

WIRED Looks at 8 Cities of the Future

WIRED Magazine has created a list of Eight Cities That Will Show You What The Future Will Look Like in the latest edition of their design issue. In the relatively short span of time that humans have been planning cities, more and more decisions have been made that have shaped the path of new technologies and methods that will make cities better. Such projects—like new streetlights, bicycle infrastructure, and traffic-sensitive museums—highlight some of these advances in the urban lifestyle.

"The cities of tomorrow might still self-assemble haltingly, but done right, the process won’t be accidental. A city shouldn’t just happen anymore. Every block, every building, every brick represents innumerable decisions. Decide well, and cities are magic," writes Wired author Adam Rogers. Read on after the break to see how 8 different cities from around the world are implementing innovative projects. 

2015 AIA Institute Honor Awards for Interior Architecture

Celebrating the most innovative spaces in the realm of interior design, the American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected this year's recipients for the prestigious Institute Honor Awards for Interior Architecture. These eight projects will be recognized for their exceptional design at the AIA 2015 National Convention and Design Exposition in Atlanta.

Learn more about the winning designs after the break.

2015 AIA Institute Honor Awards for Interior Architecture2015 AIA Institute Honor Awards for Interior Architecture2015 AIA Institute Honor Awards for Interior Architecture2015 AIA Institute Honor Awards for Interior Architecture+ 8

The Slow Death of the Corporate Architecture of Exclusion

Of all the changes in architectural typologies in recent years, one of the most dramatic - and the most documented - is the transition from corporate to more casual, 'fun' office buildings. This change has infiltrated companies from tiny 5-person start-ups to Silicon Valley giants, and while it has been pioneered by tech and media companies it has certainly not been limited to them.

Most analysis of this change focuses on work patterns created by new technology or the demands of the 'millennial' worker, but this post originally published on Means the World - the blog of NBBJ - examines the shift away from the corporate office as a product of not just what these building are but what they represent about us as a society, arguing that "when today's workers look at the midcentury office, they see a symbol of exclusion."

VARA / Studio O+A

VARA / Studio O+AVARA / Studio O+AVARA / Studio O+AVARA / Studio O+A+ 16

San Francisco, United States

Capital One Lab / Studio O+A

© Jasper Sanidad
© Jasper Sanidad

Capital One Lab / Studio O+ACapital One Lab / Studio O+ACapital One Lab / Studio O+ACapital One Lab / Studio O+A+ 12

Yelp Headquarters / Studio O+A

Yelp Headquarters / Studio O+AYelp Headquarters / Studio O+AYelp Headquarters / Studio O+AYelp Headquarters / Studio O+A+ 23

O+A: In Search of Optimal Office Design

Although office design has dramatically and drastically changed over the course of the 20th century, we aren't finished yet. San Francisco firm O+A is actively searching for today's optimal office design, designing work spaces to encourage both concentration and collaboration by merging elements from the cubicle-style office with those popularized by Steve Jobs. In this article, originally published by Metropolis Magazine as “Noises Off,” Eva Hagberg takes a look at some of their built works.

In the beginning was the cubicle. And the cubicle was almost everywhere, and the cubicle held almost everyone, and it was good. Then there was the backlash, and the cubicle was destroyed, put aside, swept away in favor of the open plan, the endless span of space, floor, and ceiling—punctuated by the occasional column so that the roof wouldn’t collapse onto the floor plate—and everyone talked about collaboration, togetherness, synergy, randomness and happenstance. Renzo Piano designed a New York Times building with open stairways so writers and editors could (would have to) run into one another, and everyone remembered the always-ahead-of-the-curve Steve Jobs who, when he was running Pixar, asked for only two bathrooms in the whole Emeryville building, and insisted they be put on the ground floor lobby so that designers and renderers could (would have to) run into each other, and such was the office culture of the new millennium.

And then there was the backlash to the backlash. Those writers wanted their own offices, and editors wanted privacy, and not everyone wanted to be running into people all the time, because not everyone was actually collaborating, even though their bosses and their bosses’ bosses said that they should, because collaboration, teamwork, and togetherness—these were the new workplace buzzwords. Until they weren’t. Until people realized that they were missing—as architect Ben Jacobson said in a Gensler sponsored panel on the need to create a balance between focus and collaboration—the concept of “parallel play,” i.e. people working next to each other, but not necessarily with each other. Until individuality came back, particularly in San Francisco in the tech scene, and particularly in the iconoclastic start-up tech scene, where people began to want something a little different.

O+A: In Search of Optimal Office DesignO+A: In Search of Optimal Office DesignO+A: In Search of Optimal Office DesignO+A: In Search of Optimal Office Design+ 8